First post with lots of questions about my Ross...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    First post with lots of questions about my Ross...

    Hello, I have been reading the mtbr forums since spring and this is my first post. I started getting back into biking this spring in Wisconsin. I have acquired two bikes, one a Klein road bike and the other a Ross mountain bike.

    The Ross is the one that I have been using for all my fun activities. I have taken it on many single-track trails in the area and it holds up great for its age. When giving it a good cleaning one day this summer I removed the front derailleur and when I tried to put it back on I snapped the nut off (I over tightened it). So now I have a useless original sun tour front derailleur. I would like to replace it but my lbs said that they are no longer made and that the bike is junk anyway. They went on to say that no manufacture makes a front derailleur that will work with my bike. I just find this to hard to believe.

    I have included pictures of the bike and the derailleur. I am also looking to replace the rear derailleur as it does not have the spring power to move into the lowest cog.

    I am trying to learn as much as I can but it's a whole new world to me. I was also interested in a 29" fork (so I can ride a larger wheel as well as have a disk brake) but from the looks of it I am not sure that I can even replace my fork without getting new bars and some other parts due to the bikes age.

    I have raced it in two WORS series races. The last one of the season I finished 58th out of 150 or so in the citizen class (with no front derailleur). Fun stuff!

    Thanks for the help!
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  2. #2
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    gosh, that thing is kinda neat. A bike that old is using road drivetrain. First i would see if i could pop the body of the bolt out with an easy-out and just replace the bolt. If i couldn't, i'd see about getting a roadie derailleur to replace it. 28.6 is the outside diameter of your seat tube, you're gonna need a replacement road (road because of your large front chainring) derailleur of that size. I would try to stick something period on it, like an old shimano 600 FD.

    I believe ross made a quality mtn bike, and would try to leave yours as such. It's easy to turn a neat old bike into a confused jumble of parts with a mucked up front end that doesn't handle as well as it did. It would probably be a good idea to replace your cables and housings, as it will make the bike shift and brake better and probably let the derailleur drop to the lowest gear. Since you seem to be pretty serious about the hobby, spend the 30$ and get some cable/housing cutters and do it yourself. It cost will be the same either way, but you'll pick up a skill and some tools.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
    Mikhail Kalashnikov

  3. #3
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    Let us know how it works out.......and if you ever plan on getting rid of the old Ross!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg
    gosh, that thing is kinda neat. A bike that old is using road drivetrain. First i would see if i could pop the body of the bolt out with an easy-out and just replace the bolt. If i couldn't, i'd see about getting a roadie derailleur to replace it. 28.6 is the outside diameter of your seat tube, you're gonna need a replacement road (road because of your large front chainring) derailleur of that size. I would try to stick something period on it, like an old shimano 600 FD.

    I believe ross made a quality mtn bike, and would try to leave yours as such. It's easy to turn a neat old bike into a confused jumble of parts with a mucked up front end that doesn't handle as well as it did. It would probably be a good idea to replace your cables and housings, as it will make the bike shift and brake better and probably let the derailleur drop to the lowest gear. Since you seem to be pretty serious about the hobby, spend the 30$ and get some cable/housing cutters and do it yourself. It cost will be the same either way, but you'll pick up a skill and some tools.
    +1 Cool old bike! I just did a quick google for 28.6 fd's and they're readily available; if you end up needing a rear derailleur that'll be easy to source, too. Don't know what's up with your shop, though. Shouldn't be too hard to keep using that fd with a new bolt, and that shouldn't be too hard to find either even in that shop's part bin...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  5. #5
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    I like resurecting old bikes and making them run again, good for you. I have snapped many bolt in my life and the one in the pictures looks to have enough sticking out for vise grips to grab, I would give that a try, take the extracted bolt to a hardware store and pick up a new one for a nickle.

    your rear derailure sound like it needs to be adjusted. The limit screws may be keeping it from shifting to the last gear, but I would deffinately change housings, new housings can make all the difference sometimes.

    Speaking of stuff to upgrade, you may want to switch shops. If you came into a shop I worked at I would try to sell you a new bike too, but I would never say that a bike is junk, I would try to sell other aspects of the new ride. The technique he used is plane ignorance. You should be able to find a new derailure for your front if you need, check thrift stores, for older bikes, you may find a complete donor bike for the price of a new modern derailure ,and benifit the thrift store in the proccess. look at the componants of the donor, and dont get stuck on the bike itself.
    You Can't Triple Stamp A Double Stamp!

  6. #6
    Seeeriously easy Livin
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    You should try posting those pics over in the vintage retro clasic forum, they may be able to tell you some cool stuff about your bike.

  7. #7
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    Google for bike shops. I bet someone has a replacement FD in a bin of parts somewhere or can easily fix yours.
    New 2008 Fuji Outland Pro FS w/ 2008 Forge Sawback 5xx grouppo.

  8. #8
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    Hey guys, thanks for all the help. I was able to take the Ross to a good LBS about 30 miles away from home. They said "no problem give me 15-20 minutes and I can have the bolts drilled out". Sure enough, I have the original back on the bike and it's looking great! I figured out why I was having so much difficulty shifting as I had thought it was the two derailleurs were getting old but when I replaced the cable I found that the cable housing that had been used was of the spiral-wound wire type. I replaced it with compressionless housing and it shift's perfect. It's unbelievable how smooth the shifting is now.

    Now that I have the "major" issues solved I am going to save for Magura HS 33's. I think that they will look and fit real nice on her. Thanks to some suggestions here I have decided that turning the bike into a "monster" or "freak" (new fork/ 69er/ 650b) is not worth it.

    I also replaced the saddle with one that is much lighter and looks better. The old one had broken anyway after some serious riding.

    I will update again when I get a picture of it fixed up.

  9. #9
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    Shifter cables are commonly spiral wound. Brake cable housings are (for obvious reasons) non-compressible and more heavy duty.

    Most likely your cables were just old. Some people advocate changing them every year - even on new bikes.
    New 2008 Fuji Outland Pro FS w/ 2008 Forge Sawback 5xx grouppo.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fibula
    Shifter cables are commonly spiral wound. Brake cable housings are (for obvious reasons) non-compressible and more heavy duty.

    Most likely your cables were just old. Some people advocate changing them every year - even on new bikes.
    I think you may be a little confused.

    Directly from Sheldon Brown "Warning: Since compressionless housing relies on plastic to hold it together, it is not as strong as conventional spiral housing, and should never be used for brakes! The loads applied to brake cables can easily cause compressionless housing to rupture and burst, causing a complete and sudden loss of brake function."

    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cables.html

  11. #11
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    Yes. I stand corrected. I thought the term compression-less housing meant the housing they use for brake housing.
    New 2008 Fuji Outland Pro FS w/ 2008 Forge Sawback 5xx grouppo.

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