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  1. #1
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    Excersize Induced Asthma?

    Has anyone ever heard of Exersize Induced Asthma? Ever since I returned from Desrt Storm way bak in 1990 I have had breathing issues. I finally went and saw a doctor and they said I have "Exersize Induced Asthma". This diagnosis was made after having me do a treadmill test and a "histamine Challenge". Has anyone here ever dealt with that condition and how has it affected thier rides?

    I find that I get out of breath very quickly but can usually motor on....I do carry an inhaler with me just in case but usually try to avoid it

  2. #2
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    Yes, I had it when I was a child. I grew out of it.

  3. #3
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    My Dr told me the same thing and gave me an inhaler. Like you I just push through it. I still have problems on occasion but as time has passed and I have become more conditioned to riding I have had fewer problems.

  4. #4
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    I got it, its a pain and affects me more in the winter (obviously) than in the summer. But it really can have a large effect on your riding, i find it a large problem with hills and also with doing cardio workouts.

  5. #5
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    I got it, but I know how to make it happen, so I avoid that.

  6. #6
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    i've been a lifelong asthmatic. flatlined from it twice. it is mildly excercise induced, but any severe attacks are trigger induced. for the excercise induced i sometimes just try to ride through it, but usually i take one puff of the inhaler before a ride so thhat i can hammer right away.

    check out the buteyko books by patrick mckeown. it's all about correcting breathing habbits to alleviate asthma. just breathing excercises and recommended diet. it's possible that you picked up some bad breathing habbits when you were in the desert. i've been using the methods described in them for a month or so now, and it has helped quite a bit.

  7. #7
    Nervous Descender
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    I have it. I found that increasing my condition largely helped to control it. Don't need the inhaler much anymore.

    Ride SS for a few years!
    Check out some of our local hills: CDRC (Capital District Road Climbs)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan420
    I got it, its a pain and affects me more in the winter (obviously) than in the summer. But it really can have a large effect on your riding, i find it a large problem with hills and also with doing cardio workouts.
    Same here. I have also found that the better physical condition I am in, the less I am affected.

    Also, I found out that gum disease can be linked to this as well.

  9. #9
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    My son had it...

    My son caught R.S.V., a respiratory virus when he was only 7 weeks old. Doctor's told us he would more than likely get asthma as he aged. At 4 years old he had his first full-blown asthma attack. He slowly developed Exercise Induced Asthma. He lived on a diet of nebulizers and Singulair for about 4 years. He seems to have outgrown it in the past year. He's now 9 years old and only has mild episodes when running long and hard.

  10. #10
    Captain Amazing
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    It really only bothers me when I road bike.

  11. #11
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    I've been dealing with it since I was little. I've never had a true attack, but I do have enough airway constriction that it makes getting into shape REALLY difficult. Inhalers never did much for me, to be honest. I played soccer as a kid and it just took me longer to get my heart/lungs into shape for heavy cardio work than everyone else.

    Right now, I try to keep my riding just under the redline for as long as possible. A HRM helps me find and maintain that zone.

  12. #12
    Double-metric mtb man
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    Another lifelong asthmatic here, but only diagnosed in the last 8 years or so. About 3 years ago I got back into riding. My asthma is made worse by the cold, by exercise and so on and so forth. It was a challenge at first to get things figured out.

    In terms of my riding, once I figured out what works for me for control, I've had no issues. I generally pre-empt any EI asthma attack by taking a couple puffs of the ventolin / salbutamol before I start to ride. Over the last few years, the riding has actually helped my asthma by getting me into better shape overall and especially my lungs.

    Although YMMV, I've had no issues riding. Although I prefer to sit and spin up big hills (vs. attacking them and getting myself really out of breath...but that's more of a shape thing and I'm still round) I have things under control enough that last year I did my first Century (100 mile ride).

    In other words, sure, it can be unsettling to get the diagnosis, but it doesn't mean it will hold you back.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

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  13. #13
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    I've suspected I might have this or a similar condition. When I excersize in cold weather it is hard for me to take deep breaths without coughing. I should have it looked into. I noticed recently when grinding up a serious climb that my breathing was not so good and when I got to the top of a 700 foot climb it hurt to breath and I wanted to cough.
    I try to spin in the saddle rather than grind it out, but sometimes you need to stand, which doesn't help the lungs too much.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  14. #14
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    Exactly....I wheeze and cough in all weather when exerting myself but it does get worse when cold

  15. #15
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    I was diagnosed with exercise-induced asthma. It's gone, now. What did I do? I eat organic cheese, avoid high-fructose corn syrup (for the most part . . . it's a process changing your diet), eat organic yogurt, and I've cut down on using cleaning products with a lot of fumes . . . looking into switching to more earth-friendly products. I absolutely avoid artificial sweeteners! All the small changes I have made this year have gotten rid of the asthma and the chronic cough I've had since 2004. I'm also not using nasal spray any more. Oh yeah, I use a neti pot.

    I started looking at my environment because people I knew who lived eight hours away were having the exact same problems. I figured it had to be food related. Mind you, I'm not allergic to anything. I never have been, and I've had testing done recently. There are just so many toxins in our food and cleansers that we're poisoning ourselves. "Asthma" can be one of the results. Fortunately, it can be reversible.

    Try slowly converting to more natural foods, and you'll probably find an improvement in how you feel. :-)

  16. #16
    Double-metric mtb man
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    Because asthma is considered an auto-immune disease, a lot of folks with asthma have allergies and / or eczema. For some people, their asthma symptoms are made worse by what they are eating and the time of year (besides the cold).

    You'll find that you'll need to figure out what works best for you as no two people will have the same symptoms or triggers. Just keep in mind that there can be other things making it better or worse.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

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  17. #17
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    Psycho Mike gives really good advice. I'm BRAND spankin' new to MTB-ing and I'm really excited to be starting it, but I've had asthma since I was 3 and 25 years later haven't outgrown it. I have a few triggers (allergies, cold dry air, excersize) and like Mike said, it's a really personal affliction, as what works for me could be completely different than what helps you tackle your triggers.

    Yesterday I went for my first trail ride (apparently moderately easy), and I'll admit, it kicked my butt...!!! BUT- I'm not going to give up. I found that the more regularly I do any type of excersize, the more it delays that ashmatic reaction. I got in shape last summer but I let it fade over the winter so I'm starting from scratch again... and last year I just did walking and such, so this year I'm going to make leaps and bounds beyond my progress last year...

    Do you only have fast acting inhalers ("rescue"), or did the doc prescribe any other type? If it's histamines, did you get any allergy medicine (Allegra, Claritin)?

    I'm no doc but if it's asthma medicince, I probably tried it at some point....

  18. #18
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    Airborne particulates seem to be a really major trigger for me.

    The absolute worst times for me were when playing indoor soccer and the concession stand would burn the popcorn. Holy cow was it hard to breathe! Tobacco smoke is a double-whammy for me because there's the particulate aspect and the addition of some other allergen that throws my sinuses into fits. Cat dander is another one that can make me wheezy.

    Road riding is extremely unpleasant for me on busy roads because of the auto exhaust (especially diesel exhaust from vehicles with poor emissions controls like dump trucks, cement mixers, etc...but also from any big truck).

    I can control my exposure to cat dander for the most part, but it can be hard to control my exposure to the other things, especially living in a city. Thankfully, getting out onto forest trails at least gets me into a location where I'm least likely to encounter any of my triggers.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk
    Airborne particulates seem to be a really major trigger for me.

    The absolute worst times for me were when playing indoor soccer and the concession stand would burn the popcorn. Holy cow was it hard to breathe! Tobacco smoke is a double-whammy for me because there's the particulate aspect and the addition of some other allergen that throws my sinuses into fits. Cat dander is another one that can make me wheezy.

    Road riding is extremely unpleasant for me on busy roads because of the auto exhaust (especially diesel exhaust from vehicles with poor emissions controls like dump trucks, cement mixers, etc...but also from any big truck).
    OH yeah those are a horrible triggers for me... smoke and cat dander... argh..!


  20. #20
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    I agree Dub, Psycho Mike always give good advice.
    I've slowly been changing my diet and also switching to more natural/organic foods and have noticed a difference....It's a work in progress, but I have noticed a change over the last year.
    I've never been diagnosed with Asthema, but haven't really been to the doctor for a physical for about 18 years. I'm in really good health besides being a bit overweight.
    I have always suspected I have a very mild asthema, but it has not effected me enough to go to the doc for it. But as I am getting older, and now have medical coverage through work, I will be going in for complete bloodwork, and regular checkups. Who knows what they'll find....= )
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  21. #21
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    I have asthma and always use my inhaler 20 minutes before a workout of any kind- per doctor's instructions. You never know what may trigger an attack, even if it is mostly exercise induced. If you have an allergy to mold or ragweed, or anything else, you will probably encounter it in the woods. I've known several people, myself included, who were initially diagnosed with exercise induced asthma but ended up having allergy induced as well. If it is cold I wear turtle fur fleece around my mouth to warm up the air.

  22. #22
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    I've had asthma since I was in high school. As I got older, I've had to use it less and less. The only time I need to use it is when I ride or do any kind of cardio type excercise. Going about my daily business, I don't need it.

    I puff twice before riding and I'm good to go for the entire ride.

  23. #23
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann
    I've never been diagnosed with Asthma, but haven't really been to the doctor for a physical for about 18 years. I'm in really good health besides being a bit overweight.
    I have always suspected I have a very mild asthema, but it has not effected me enough to go to the doc for it.
    I'm roughly in the same boat as Savage. I may have been diagnosed with it when I was very young, but when I tried using the inhalers it caused me to breathe worse. I threw them down and moved on until recently. I find it hard to breathe when it's cold, dry, and i'm exercising. I play a lot of basketball and if I play outside in the cold I get affected, but if I stop for a minute I'm fine. I recently moved into an apartment and it's furnace is filled with dust. I'm allergic to dust, I use to take an allergy shot for this, so now I find it hard to breathe when I'm inside. Therefore, I'm not at home except to sleep.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  24. #24
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    I also have exercised induced asthma, diagnosed around high school. Mines was minor enough, and I was too lazy to carry a inhaler to soccer practice, that I just exercised with it.

    As I got older and slightly out of shape, I noticed it was worse when I would exercise. Now that I'm back into mtn biking and running, its still with me, but barely, not enough to warrant an inhaler. Everyone is different, many people need a quick puff of smoke (inhaler) before exercise to open up their airways.

    good luck

  25. #25
    Mud Honey
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    There's a lot of good advice here. I was diagnosed in 92. The docs think the condition was caused by the chalk dust in the gym where I was a competetive gymnast at that time. Something about the fine particulate matter lodging itself in my lung tissue. (Maybe sand, etc. for you Gotkenpo )
    I took up running about 5 years ago and slowly built up my endurance. I had to start with just a 1/2 mile at a time and worked up to 3+ miles a day over a 6 month period on a track in a very clean athletic center. Now the only things that trigger it are laughing too hard, major physical exertion in the cold dry air and a bush that flowers here in the summer. My suggestion is to take it easy and work up to longer rides. Stop and take a break when you start to feel an attack coming on, and make sure you have plenty of water available. Good luck!
    And at the end of the day, she smelled of dirt.

  26. #26
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    If you can exercise at a medium level without needing an inhaler just build your system up for long rides. I have asthma too but I have never used an inhaler. I only even notice it in the cold with extremely heavy exertion, so I don't bother taking an inhaler with me anywhere.

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