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  1. #1
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    Listen! downhill technique books

    i am starting to ride downhill.

    any good books with techniques on drop offs, jumping, cornenring etc?

    PS. sites and videos are welcome too.

  2. #2
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    Fluidride - Ride Ride Like a Pro would be a good place to start. Pretty much any skill book or video will help you no matter what type of riding you are trying to do. What's your skill level currently? I would suggest that spending some money going to a week/weekend riding camp at a mountain would be a really good use of your time and money.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  3. #3
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    i am a fairly good rider, but i don't go that big.

  4. #4
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    I find Lee McCormack's book and website to be pretty informative.

    Lee Likes Bikes

    There is an ad for the book on the website, or it is available from Amazon. I even saw a copy at my local book store.

  5. #5
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    You can read a sample of that book here:

    http://books.google.com/books/reader...source=gbs_atb

    Pretty sure there's a sample floating around Google that lets you view more pages.

    Mastering mountain bike skills - Brian Lopes, Lee McCormack - Google Books

  6. #6
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    Mastering Mountain Bike Skills by Lopes and McCormack is an excellent book, and the skills taught in it translate from XC, to DH, to street, etc. Even if you've been riding for a while, it will help codify what you're already doing, and might help correct some bad habits. I highly recommend it.

    I seem to remember you and I arguing about this very book...

  7. #7
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    thank you guys!!!!!!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Mastering Mountain Bike Skills by Lopes and McCormack is an excellent book, and the skills taught in it translate from XC, to DH, to street, etc. Even if you've been riding for a while, it will help codify what you're already doing, and might help correct some bad habits. I highly recommend it.


    I seem to remember you and I arguing about this very book...
    That's a case of readers having differing interpretations from the info presented in the book.

    I'm not sure if it was with you, but the only thing I remember arguing about, where the book was referenced, was advice being given to someone that promoted getting your ass behind the saddle in technical sections, with the idea that it helps you slow down and stay in control. I was trying to promote a low and center position and arguing that you only need to get your ass behind the saddle when that's the proper position to be in to stay centered (having your center of mass aligned above the BB, perpendicular to sea level) and that was only really the case when your bike was pointing downhill steeply, especially when your front wheel goes off a ledge and your rear hasn't yet. I pointed out that the pic in the book was an exaggeration--really only meant for emergency stops, such as when you're about to collide head on with another rider on singletrack too narrow to allow passing.

    Here's a site that doesn't really have DH tips, but has good advice in general (better than most other bike tip sites): Essential Mountain Biking Skills and Tips | mtbtips.com

    Mountain Bike School, Mountain Bike Camps, coaching by Betterride has a blog that many interesting articles, though can be opinionated.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    I'm not sure if it was with you, but the only thing I remember arguing about was advice being given to someone that promoted getting your ass behind the saddle in technical sections, to help you slow down. I was trying to promote a low and center position and arguing that you only need to get your ass behind the saddle when that's the proper position to be in to stay centered (having your center of mass aligned above the BB, perpendicular to sea level) and that was only really the case when your bike was pointing downhill steeply, especially when your front wheel goes off a ledge and your rear hasn't yet. I pointed out that the pic in the book was an exaggeration--really only meant for emergency stops, such as when you're about to collide head on with another rider on singletrack too narrow to allow passing.
    Nope, definitely wasn't that since I agree with what you wrote. I think it was turning the bars versus leaning the bike, but my memory isn't very good.

  10. #10
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    Oh, haha. Yea. I remember that one, but don't remember the book being referenced though. I think people misunderstood me there. Road bikers use something called counter steer, pushing the bar forward with their right arm to corner right--the bike goes left, but since your body weight is moving forward in its original direction, the bike leans and tries to recenter/balance itself, which sets up their corner. They have a really wide and smooth road to use, with predictable traction, and it's really easy to have vision to help guide you through the corner.

    On a mtb, using vision greatly helps, but it's often blocked by brush and trees. I find that starting wide, turning late (just before the front wheel reaches the apex), initiating with the handlebars, and leaning to help your inertia change direction results in sharper corners (difference is starting with the handlebars rather than just leaning). I'm not a fan of starting in the center of the trail, then turning wide, to create a counter steer, before turning into the turn, since your rear wheel is too close to the apex and you'd need to slide it to get it to follow the front tire around the apex properly. If you simply rely on a lean a try to cut the turn road racing style, they often come out wide, especially if there are ruts caused from other bikers carving the corner. It's more or less aiming the front tire where you want it to go, rather than thinking about the turning the handlebar or altering your lean angle. The lean is simply to help redirect the inertia you had going straight and turn it into traction that helps you make the corner. Pointing the wheel is the important part. If you turn too soon and your front wheel is pointing at the brush, that's where the bike goes. Turn early and the inside apex limits how much you can turn your wheel and its very difficult to turn your wheel more once past the apex. I'm way past that stuff. I simply use vision and all that happens for me by instinct. The timing, entry speed, and line are key though, which changes for every turn. Just takes one pass to find the best place for last minute speed adjust/braking and the best line that lets me start as wide as possible and cut the apex as close as possible, to allow for more entry and exit speed. It's all vision for me at this point. I see a good line and I simply follow it. If i can't see the line and I'm riding blind (first time on the trail, but wanting to go as fast as possible), I just enter a bit slower and pedal harder once through. Berms are a different story. Those are more about strength and commitment. If you're a strong rider, you can pretty much aim to destroy berms, not using any brakes at all, since you need to have muscles to resist folding under all those Gs.

    Believe it or not, but I come across noobs that don't know how to corner and claim they've been working on leaning. I tell them to use the handlebars more, and they seemingly become enlightened and take corners with crazy speed and end up pushing me to go faster. Point is, it's not leaning > handlebars nor leaning = high speed and handlebars = low speed. You have to use both. Misinterpreting advice causes problems. Being able to effectively word your advice well is a skill. There's a huge difference between a famous pro DHer trying to teach people how to ride DH and a good instructor, that isn't a pro DHer nor can even come close to the pro's skills, teaching people. The instructor will have much more successful students. The pro's students have very mixed success. If you pit the students against each other, I'm confident the instructor's students will outclass the pro's students.
    Last edited by Varaxis; 11-09-2011 at 01:45 PM.

  11. #11
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    There are a few video links in these posts which might be helpful.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/8404512-post12.html

    http://forums.mtbr.com/8414287-post15.html

    .

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