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  1. #1
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    DIY Chainstay Protectors

    I was looking through some pics of the rides on MTBR and I noticed that a number of you have "home made" chainstay protectors. They appear to be tubes cut down and wraped around the frame. My question if my assumption is correct do you have to do anything to the tube first (ie cut it down the middle into 2 pieces to reduce its bulk)?

    Thanks a bunch

  2. #2
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    Chain stay protectors such as Lizardskin are inexpensive, easy to come by, and function quite well. Some do use wraps of different sorts. I have seen many people use bar tape as a protector. The same tape as they use on their road bikes. Some use this because they just happen to have some around after re-wraping their bars. If you have to go out and buy something anyway you are just as well off with the skins unless you are trying to match colors or have multiple bikes to wrap. I have not seen a tube used, but I guess it would work if you cut it down.

  3. #3
    Forging Elite Awesomeness
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    Quote Originally Posted by gnslr
    If you have to go out and buy something anyway you are just as well off with the skins
    Exactly the reason why my first bike had a chainstay protector made out of black velvet and sewn on the bottom. Don't ask why I had black velvet around the house (or the time to sew it).

  4. #4
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    Most riders have a few old tubes lying around, pretty much everyone uses them where I am. Just cut it once to open it up and wrap it around the chainstay like you'd tape a hockey stick and put a zip tie or two on the end (and maybe one at the starting point for good measure). I have a lizardskin, but I prefer the tube method - doesn't move at all (unlike the lizardskin) and doesn't really cost anything as the tube would otherwise be destined for the garbage...

  5. #5
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    I use tennis racket or hockey stick handle tape
    cheers
    Pagey

  6. #6
    local trails rider
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    The inner tube method is practically free after you have had a few flats: recycling at its best.

    The tube also works very well as protection and for reducing the noice of the chain slaping against the stay. It may be difficult to make it look really neat.

  7. #7
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    I just went out and bought a Lizard Skin one. Had it since 98...

  8. #8
    wyrd bi ful rd
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    just cut along the axis of the tube such the you have a long strip that you can wrap along the chainstay and back ... i cut them on either side so that each strip is not too broad ...

    20080312 chain stay wrap MTBR FORUM.jpg

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinaman
    just cut along the axis of the tube such the you have a long strip that you can wrap along the chainstay and back ... i cut them on either side so that each strip is not too broad ...

    20080312 chain stay wrap MTBR FORUM.jpg
    That is what I was talking about. I know the lizard skins are cheap but I dont like the look of them.

    Thanks for all the help guys

  10. #10
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    My bike came with a thin sticker type thing on the chainstay. Same color as the bike, and it seems to do the job.

  11. #11
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by comptiger5000
    My bike came with a thin sticker type thing on the chainstay. Same color as the bike, and it seems to do the job.
    Those stickers get trashed in short order and then they start to be a grime magnet. No thanks. I peel them off at first opportunity. I may try the tube method. I've got a couple laying around and my Lizard Skin has seen better days (it's looking pretty grimy itself lately).

    In the past, I've used zip ties, but those are a horrible grunge magnet and it's impossible to clean them out without just removing and replacing them. They don't do much for the noise, either.

  12. #12
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    Yeah, my sticker has a few scratches in it, but nothing too bad yet. When it starts to get really bad or messy, then I'll pull it and replace it with something else.

  13. #13
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    So since I'm a noob - what's the point of these things other than preventing the frame from being scratched?

  14. #14
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grandturk
    So since I'm a noob - what's the point of these things other than preventing the frame from being scratched?
    At first, all that happens is paint scratching, but if left unattended, excessive chain slap can start to gouge the frame. This is especially true for aluminum frames, since chains are usually made of steel, which is much harder. Not only that, but chain slap makes an awful lot of noise. It's just better to put something on there that will protect the frame and cut down on all the racket.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grandturk
    So since I'm a noob - what's the point of these things other than preventing the frame from being scratched?
    It is not just the chain slapping. On many bikes the read derailleur hits the chainstay from underneath(at least, Shimano mechs do). In long run, it may damage the chainstay considerably, if not snap it at all. Neither Lizardskins nor inner tube are effective, the mech just eats its way through. I use pieces of tyre, wrapped all around the chainstay for protection, secure them with zip ties.

  16. #16
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    I used to use a Lizard wrap until I recently upgraded components. When I pulled my cranks off the largest amount of slapping was behind the middle/small rings where the Lizard wasn't covering. The Lizard did a good job for the length it covered but it wasn't enough. I went with this:

    http://www.framewrap.com/

    because it is relatively cheap, looks good, and is easy on. Plus I had a couple bikes to do it on so it breaks down to the price of tubes (I tend not to pop tubes so I would have had to use new ones) and I saved on zip ties.

    Here's some reviews from here too:

    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Extras/product_132039.shtml

  17. #17
    Hip
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    I used vinyl electrical tape...working good so far...

  18. #18
    ballbuster
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    Easy fix...

    Quote Originally Posted by Noob7_0
    I was looking through some pics of the rides on MTBR and I noticed that a number of you have "home made" chainstay protectors. They appear to be tubes cut down and wraped around the frame. My question if my assumption is correct do you have to do anything to the tube first (ie cut it down the middle into 2 pieces to reduce its bulk)?

    Thanks a bunch
    Use the big ring.

    Problem solved.

  19. #19
    Bionic Mtn Biker
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    Here's mine. Some bar tape I got at the discount bin at my LBS for $1.99, wrapped TIGHT, and held in place at each end via zip ties. It does a great job of buffering the noise and absorbing chain slap, and has lasted more than a season of agressive riding. After each season, I'll just remove it (it's still in good condition) during frame inspection and put on a new one from the excess tape. Been doing this since '05.

    Better than he was before. Better. . . Stronger. . . Faster. (but not smarter)

  20. #20
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    Yea, the bar tape method is TiT$. I'm gonna get some grey camo bar tape and do it on my new ride, which will soon be sporting grey camo Sun MTX hoops laced to pewter chirs king hubs.

    The bar tape is cheap, and if you get slap on the chain stays and seat stays, just wrap them both. It's hella light too, since it is made for road bike handlebars.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  21. #21
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    Found this stuff at HD this weekend, it's the sh!t.

    VELCRO Brand 30 ft. x 1-1/2 in. One-Wrap Strap-91372 - The Home Depot

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hip View Post
    I used vinyl electrical tape...working good so far...
    Not to mention, electrical tape can be found in almost any color which offers even more customization for the look of your bike.

    Electrical tape and bright green cable ties all over my ride.

  23. #23
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    Fast Forward from 2008: "Are modern/progressive chainstay protectors worth it?"


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