Determining a frame's designed wheel size- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Determining a frame's designed wheel size

    Are there useful rules of thumb as to distinguishing bikes from ones, or is it all just eyeballing it?

    Case in point, I was poking around Santa Cruz clearance sale via the Hot Deals thread and all the frames (Nickel 1.1, Butcher, et al) are listed by SC without ANY technical info. Making things more confusing, when I looked these frames up on google, both review sites and retailer sites often only talked about accepted tire widths, not tire/wheel sizes themselves.

    It feels like my level of obfuscation is becoming absurd, so I get the feeling I'm missing something "hidden" in plain sight. Could someone please clue me in?

  2. #2
    Flow like water
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    Call Santa Cruz. We can't help you if they have not published the information you need. Call them, not us. Make them do their job.

  3. #3
    Upcyclist
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    You can use the search and reviews up above on this page.

  4. #4
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    I think I should rephrase: the information for nearly *any* frame exists, but websites do not list it, and I was wondering if it's because the reader is just assumed to know how to spec a bike as or sight.

    MTBR itself was naturally the first place I looked -- no dice. (e.g. Santa Cruz Heckler All Mountain Full Suspension Reviews) As I said originally, the Santa Cruz link was an illustration of what I was talking about; it's not just Santa Cruz or just in this instance where I need information. While the telephone technically remains an option *every* time , but for the same reason noone uses 411 to get phone numbers anymore, I'm not looking to use the phone here.

    What it breaks down to is this: Much like in non-novice bike talk, where no one translates terms like BB30, FS, HT because they're all assumed to be common knowledge, I'm asking whether there is a 'common knowledge' way of determining the wheels a bike frame uses just from looking at it. I think I may be asking in the wrong sub-forum.

  5. #5
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    Yea,now that I think back to when I was searching for a bike,that was something i noticed too.I just Googled "Santa Cruz Nickel wheel size" and found it.

    I would have to see a picture of the bike as a complete to guess on wheel size.Looking at the distance between the brake rotor and rim would be my guess.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
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    26"

    Usually you can find this information on company web sites. If they don't say it in the description, often the size is mentioned where the spec gives the OEM tire.

    While 29" isn't exactly new at this point, it's still a more recent development than 26" wheels and it's been working its way up in travel, from XC hardtails toward AM bikes. So if you're looking at something long-travel and it's a little older, it's probably 26". If you're looking at a really monster current bike, it's probably 26".

    The suspension fork is sometimes another place you can find a wheel size given. Or at least, you can look up the fork and find out what wheels it was offered for.

    TBH, I think that just using the phone or emailing SC themselves would have been better here. Their clearance sale is a slightly weird situation - normally you'll be able to find specs very easily.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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