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  1. #1
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    Clippless pedals

    I was using shimano M540 spds. I was not so confident to go anywhere as a few times I fell of as I could not unclip on time (although they were adjusted to the softest mode). Then I sold shimanos and I switched to flat pedals and I was really better on technical staff. When I want to go fast though I think I miss spds. I am thinking to try either time or crank bros but I am not 100% sure if the problem was the pedals. What do you think? Any spds you would recommend? Should I just stay with flats?

  2. #2
    A wheelist
    Reputation: Mike T.'s Avatar
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    We did this topic at length twice in the past couple of weeks. Read what I wrote in response.


    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=386877

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=390340
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with information and motivation.

  3. #3
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    thanks

  4. #4
    wyrd bi ful rd
    Reputation: chinaman's Avatar
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    for the benefit of those who will inadvertantly venture into this post ...

    QUOTE from MIKE T from thread 386877

    ... I've used road clip-in pedals and mtb clip-in pedals since they hit the shops (approx '85 and '90 respectively) so I've got a bit of experience.

    If the Time (or any other pedal) are non-adjustable for release tension and you are having trouble getting out then they are the wrong pedal for you. You need some adjustable mid-range Shimanos or something like that. Set the retention pressure very low and perform the shoe check & mods that I'll describe below and you'll have (at first) trouble staying IN the pedals.

    Mount the cleats and insert the shoe/cleat into the pedal by hand and turn the shoe over so you can see what's happening. Slowly release the shoe and watch to see if ANY sole rubber touches the pedal. If it does, trim it off with a boxcutter knife. Nothing must touch.

    Now go ride and practise clipping in and out. Only a complete fool would venture into terrain where necessary unclippings come as a surprise. I love this bit in your post - "If I am going slow and the bike stops against a log or something there is just no chance of me getting ready fast enough to unclip."

    What the heck is a clip-in pedal newb doing in a situation like that?

    Get yourself onto some benign trails where you can totally pre-plan all stops, Then you can make sure the brain/foot connection is working as you roll up to a zillion planned stops and unclip easily and safely.

    I also love what poster CS had to say - "You will fall. I guarantee it."
    That is so much a load of rubbish it's not funny.

    Why would anyone in any sport set themselves up for failure because they don't know how their equipment works or how to set it up correctly? Let's hope he doesn't decide to scuba dive or parachute.

    In the early days of clip-ins *I* didn't fall, my son didn't fall, my club members didn't fall. Why? because we understood how the stuff worked and dialed the brain/foot auto connection in safe and non critical areas. What could be the outcome of failing to unclip on a roadbike at a busy red light?

    You find your Time hard to get out of. I just wish you could experience the ease of how I get out of my (non adjustable) Eggbeaters. It takes like a nano-gram of pressure to pop out of my pedals. No fighting. No struggling.

    But newbs will pop out of loose pedals until their muscle memory realizes that a spring and its pressure isn't necessary to keep the foot in the pedal.

    So to get rid of your frustrations, work on the main issues here - non adjustable pedals are not the ideal setup for Newbs. When you have the skill dialed then those pedals will make more sense. There's nothing wrong with them by the way; I've had a few makes of non-adjustables and they all work fine.

    Then get the shoe/pedal interface dialed - trim off anything that restricts release.

    Then practise in a safe, controlled environment. Graduate to tougher terrain as your skill and confidence improves.

    UNQUOTE

    mike ... maybe you need to get a moderator to make your composition a sticky ...

  5. #5
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinaman
    for the benefit of those who will inadvertantly venture into this post ...QUOTE from MIKE T from thread 386877.......mike ... maybe you need to get a moderator to make your composition a sticky ...
    I expanded on this rant on the page I followed up with on my website. Jeeze it gets frustrating at times seeing the Newbs struggling with bad technique, unsuitable equipment and questionable advice. If they could just get some acceptable advice (NOT the "Ohh you're gonna fall lots!" crap) and practise until proficient, then in minutes, hours or days they will wonder what all the fuss was about.
    Mike T's home wheelbuilding site - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilders with information and motivation.

  6. #6
    Probably drunk right now
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    I hear ya....

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T.
    I expanded on this rant on the page I followed up with on my website. Jeeze it gets frustrating at times seeing the Newbs struggling with bad technique, unsuitable equipment and questionable advice. If they could just get some acceptable advice (NOT the "Ohh you're gonna fall lots!" crap) and practise until proficient, then in minutes, hours or days they will wonder what all the fuss was about.
    People don't learn to drive by entering the Baja 500 and "figuring it out" so I'm not sure why they would expect to hit singletrack and not fall.

    Everyone falls due to clipless pedals at some point. But I didn't go through a learning period where I fell a lot or felt it was dangerous to ride due to being clipped in. But I learned a little differently than people who fall a lot.

    I placed my bike in a door frame where I could easily reach both sides and clipped and unclipped until I could get in and out without thinking about it too much. Then I graduated to riding around the neighborhood park. Then on to streets, over curbs, etc. And finally after I could clip in and out reliably, I ventured off on singletrack.

  7. #7
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    I started off with Shimano pedals and found them a bit difficuolt at times to clip out of, even with the tension screw set low. They were my first experience with clipless pedals. Anyway, I replaced them with Crankbrothers Mallet pedals and found the CB's to be much easier to clip out of. My .02

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