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  1. #1
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    clipless

    i am thinking about getting some new pedals, i need something that are clipless but still have a decent platform. has anyone used the crank bros candy?

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    I had the candy sl, didn't really care for them, but I'm kinda picky

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    So, you've decided to go clipless. Great! You will be thrilled with the new found power output that exceeds your fitness, and the confidence gained from never falling off the pedals. Ever.

    But what clipless pedals will you choose to accompany you in your foray into the world of extreme power and speed? One common answer is Crank Brothers' Mediocre Crap CSLTiXX. These pedals release as smoothly as flat pedals; even smoother if you tap a rock with your foot. Their bushings are just as smooth as everyone else's bearings, provided you keep them greased, until they inevitably develop play. One of the best features of Crank Brothers' pedals is their self adjusting release tension. If the tension is too high initially, don't worry, soon the soft brass cleat will be so worn you're popping out even when you don't intend to. When you need to get them serviced, no problem, Crank Brothers' used to have truly exceptional customer service.

    Another popular consideration is platform-clipless pedals. These provide the searing speed of a clipless pedal with the timeless appearance of a classic flat. The platform is cosmetic- you can't stand on it unclipped because of the big bulge the clipless mechanism creates, but to even suggest standing on this piece of art is almost an outrage. If everything lines up properly, your soft-soled shoes will get some support from standing on the cage, but with quality shoes you're really just carrying around a fashion piece. With this in mind, platform clipless pedals function the best with a quality shoe. The reason to buy quality gear is for when other riders 'sniff your butt' at the trailhead, and you need them to know you ride platform-clipless for the aesthetic value, and not simply due to inexperience.

    Unfortunately, despite the bewildering array of fantastic options in the clipless universe, there are a couple to avoid- shimano and time. Time pedals function much like the CB pedals, but deny you the opportunity to interract with CB's delightful CS staff. The shimano pedals are the worst of all. This faceless corporation is known for it's consistent 'quality standards.' They make visually complicated pedals that 10 years ago were terrible at shedding mud. They rely on adjustable force to keep you in, rather than what angle your foot is at, giving you a harsh reminder where your foot can go before it is liberated from this loathsome pedal. Their steel cleats last almost forever, forcing you to chuck those scarcely worn multi-release cleats you realize are more of a hazard than a benefit. Did i mention that shimano is totally uncool? To be sure, unless you are willing to throw perfectly good pedals away to try something new because you're curious... these are pedals that are best avoided.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by D34ThL0rd69
    So, you've decided to go clipless. Great! You will be thrilled with the new found power output that exceeds your fitness, and the confidence gained from never falling off the pedals. Ever.

    But what clipless pedals will you choose to accompany you in your foray into the world of extreme power and speed? One common answer is Crank Brothers' Mediocre Crap CSLTiXX. These pedals release as smoothly as flat pedals; even smoother if you tap a rock with your foot. Their bushings are just as smooth as everyone else's bearings, provided you keep them greased, until they inevitably develop play. One of the best features of Crank Brothers' pedals is their self adjusting release tension. If the tension is too high initially, don't worry, soon the soft brass cleat will be so worn you're popping out even when you don't intend to. When you need to get them serviced, no problem, Crank Brothers' used to have truly exceptional customer service.

    Another popular consideration is platform-clipless pedals. These provide the searing speed of a clipless pedal with the timeless appearance of a classic flat. The platform is cosmetic- you can't stand on it unclipped because of the big bulge the clipless mechanism creates, but to even suggest standing on this piece of art is almost an outrage. If everything lines up properly, your soft-soled shoes will get some support from standing on the cage, but with quality shoes you're really just carrying around a fashion piece. With this in mind, platform clipless pedals function the best with a quality shoe. The reason to buy quality gear is for when other riders 'sniff your butt' at the trailhead, and you need them to know you ride platform-clipless for the aesthetic value, and not simply due to inexperience.

    Unfortunately, despite the bewildering array of fantastic options in the clipless universe, there are a couple to avoid- shimano and time. Time pedals function much like the CB pedals, but deny you the opportunity to interract with CB's delightful CS staff. The shimano pedals are the worst of all. This faceless corporation is known for it's consistent 'quality standards.' They make visually complicated pedals that 10 years ago were terrible at shedding mud. They rely on adjustable force to keep you in, rather than what angle your foot is at, giving you a harsh reminder where your foot can go before it is liberated from this loathsome pedal. Their steel cleats last almost forever, forcing you to chuck those scarcely worn multi-release cleats you realize are more of a hazard than a benefit. Did i mention that shimano is totally uncool? To be sure, unless you are willing to throw perfectly good pedals away to try something new because you're curious... these are pedals that are best avoided.
    What would you recommend to the OP then? You just tore apart 95% (or higher) of the pedals that you will see at a race on any given day. I have been very happy with my shimano 520's even in the mud, but recently put on a set of CB's eggbeaters to shed a little weight but I don't have an opinion yet on them.

  5. #5
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    I would vote against Crank Brothers pedals and vote for Shimano and Time. You will get opinions for and against every pedal. So that makes deciding difficult.

    Also I like platform clip ins for the type of riding I do. (all mountain and dh) I do use the platform only when I clip out and need to get back on the pedal fast.

    I use Shimano's m647 for a platform, the xtr when I don't want a platform and Canfields when I only want a platform.
    To answer your question, I have not used the candy's but I've used the eggbeaters and the acids. I have had trouble with the coming out of the pedal in technical riding situations especially when I am powering on an upstroke. After several falls due to the pedal not letting go, I no longer ride crank brothers. My girlfriend can ride them just fine cause she doesn't really put herself in touchy situations.
    Good luck with your selection

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    what shimanos?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrandonB90
    what shimanos?
    Who are you asking?
    I use two sets:
    The m647's are the clipins with a large platform
    The xtr's are clipins with no platform
    I use both pedals.
    I'll use the xtr's when I'm doing a lot of pedaling and not a lot of technical riding.
    I'll use the m647's when the riding is technical or I'm not pedaling a lot (shuttling, lift service)

  8. #8
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    If you live in the UK, pay for the postage and you can have my pair for the price of a beer. Still new in manufacturer packaging,

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    I'm in the us

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee
    What would you recommend to the OP then? You just tore apart 95% (or higher) of the pedals that you will see at a race on any given day. I have been very happy with my shimano 520's even in the mud, but recently put on a set of CB's eggbeaters to shed a little weight but I don't have an opinion yet on them.
    Ummm...I think he just recommended Shimano and Time...with a little wit thrown in for free.

    Shimano 520's and 540's are good pedals at decent price points.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by D34ThL0rd69
    So, you've decided to go clipless. Great! You will be thrilled with the new found power output that exceeds your fitness, and the confidence gained from never falling off the pedals. Ever.

    But what clipless pedals will you choose to accompany you in your foray into the world of extreme power and speed? One common answer is Crank Brothers' Mediocre Crap CSLTiXX. These pedals release as smoothly as flat pedals; even smoother if you tap a rock with your foot. Their bushings are just as smooth as everyone else's bearings, provided you keep them greased, until they inevitably develop play. One of the best features of Crank Brothers' pedals is their self adjusting release tension. If the tension is too high initially, don't worry, soon the soft brass cleat will be so worn you're popping out even when you don't intend to. When you need to get them serviced, no problem, Crank Brothers' used to have truly exceptional customer service.

    Another popular consideration is platform-clipless pedals. These provide the searing speed of a clipless pedal with the timeless appearance of a classic flat. The platform is cosmetic- you can't stand on it unclipped because of the big bulge the clipless mechanism creates, but to even suggest standing on this piece of art is almost an outrage. If everything lines up properly, your soft-soled shoes will get some support from standing on the cage, but with quality shoes you're really just carrying around a fashion piece. With this in mind, platform clipless pedals function the best with a quality shoe. The reason to buy quality gear is for when other riders 'sniff your butt' at the trailhead, and you need them to know you ride platform-clipless for the aesthetic value, and not simply due to inexperience.

    Unfortunately, despite the bewildering array of fantastic options in the clipless universe, there are a couple to avoid- shimano and time. Time pedals function much like the CB pedals, but deny you the opportunity to interract with CB's delightful CS staff. The shimano pedals are the worst of all. This faceless corporation is known for it's consistent 'quality standards.' They make visually complicated pedals that 10 years ago were terrible at shedding mud. They rely on adjustable force to keep you in, rather than what angle your foot is at, giving you a harsh reminder where your foot can go before it is liberated from this loathsome pedal. Their steel cleats last almost forever, forcing you to chuck those scarcely worn multi-release cleats you realize are more of a hazard than a benefit. Did i mention that shimano is totally uncool? To be sure, unless you are willing to throw perfectly good pedals away to try something new because you're curious... these are pedals that are best avoided.
    Dude, your posts almost always crack me up. Thanks

  12. #12
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    Hi all ! The best way to get started is with shimano pedals and the #56 cleats which release from multiple angles , then as you get more comfy you can crank up the tension and use the # 51 cleat....brad ps times are good also

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    I would recommend the Forte Carve from Perfomance Bike to any beginner. Great reviews on here. I have 250 miles on mine with no complaints. Really no reason to get the Shimanos IMO. These are every bit as good and cheaper.

  14. #14
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    FWIW I've used Mallets, Eggbeater SLs and Smartys and had no issues with any of them after 2-3 years regular use. I've done zero maintenance on them. The big platform on the Mallets give a bit of reassurance as you learn but the Eggs are my favourite.

    If I started with Shimanos or Times I'd probably recommend those, and if I had more time now I'd write a wittier post.

  15. #15
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    Speedplay Frogs.

    The best, seemingly the least recognized clipless pedal on the market. They are super easy to get into, super easy to get out of and you get more float too. The design is so simple that there has never been a need for me to even test how thier customer service is.
    Brandon
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmcttr
    Ummm...I think he just recommended Shimano and Time...with a little wit thrown in for free.

    Shimano 520's and 540's are good pedals at decent price points.
    [QUOTE] there are a couple to avoid- shimano and time. Time pedals function much like the CB pedals, but deny you the opportunity to interract with CB's delightful CS staff. The shimano pedals are the worst of all[QUOTE]

    Nope I think he made it clear not to go with the Shimano or Time

    But I do agree that Shimano 520's or 540's are a great way to go.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by BLOWNDFIZ
    Speedplay Frogs.

    The best, seemingly the least recognized clipless pedal on the market. They are super easy to get into, super easy to get out of and you get more float too. The design is so simple that there has never been a need for me to even test how thier customer service is.
    Agreed They are the only ones I will use.

    The only gripe I have against them is the plastic bodies don't take hits to rocks as well as if they were metal. In the roughly 10 years I have used them on all my bikes I have destroyed 2, but I seem to be a lot better about hitting my pedals on rocks these past few years.

  18. #18
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    [QUOTE=bdundee][QUOTE] there are a couple to avoid- shimano and time. Time pedals function much like the CB pedals, but deny you the opportunity to interract with CB's delightful CS staff. The shimano pedals are the worst of all

    Nope I think he made it clear not to go with the Shimano or Time

    But I do agree that Shimano 520's or 540's are a great way to go.
    I think you are missing the sarcasm in this post. Or....I'm just wrong again. Maybe someone else (like D34ThL0rd69) can set us straight).

  19. #19
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    [QUOTE=gmcttr][QUOTE=bdundee]
    there are a couple to avoid- shimano and time. Time pedals function much like the CB pedals, but deny you the opportunity to interract with CB's delightful CS staff. The shimano pedals are the worst of all

    I think you are missing the sarcasm in this post. Or....I'm just wrong again. Maybe someone else (like D34ThL0rd69) can set us straight).
    Ok I probably am, it is a great post though.

  20. #20
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    [QUOTE=bdundee][QUOTE=gmcttr]
    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee
    ....it is a great post though.
    Agreed

    We now return you to your regularly scheduled thread.

  21. #21
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    [QUOTE=bdundee][QUOTE=gmcttr]
    Quote Originally Posted by bdundee

    Ok I probably am, it is a great post though.
    More sarcasm?
    The post was usefull perhaps in one of those threads where people like to have religious battles over what is the right way to mountain bike. It really did not have any use in the beginner forum. That is why I did not think it was worth commenting on.

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    My first clipless set was a pair of M520's. I liked them a lot but they went with my bike when I sold it. My next bike came with CB's eggbeaters. I will be going back to the Shimanos soon. I find the CB's to be harder to get into, and I'm already SICK and TIRED of replacing the stupid brass cleats. I went through two sets this season and I've only ridden them since August.

  23. #23
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    Shimano M-647

    These pedals have a very sturdy resin platform around them, and are incredibly easy to clip into with a very predictable and consistent release.

    If you want them to be easy to clip out of with virtually no learning curve needed, and no low speed tip overs, then get the SH-56 Multi-Release cleat for your shoes. Then it will be almost as easy as dabbing with platform pedals. I use this setup on both me and the girlfriends Motolites, and we ride some very rocky trails here in Arizona.

    I tried other clipless pedals and never felt confident on gnarly rocky trails, but with these I am. With platforms my feet came off when powering up stair steppy stufff. With the M-647 I can power the pedal over the top of the stroke, and pull the bike up with me, and they keep my feet on the pegs on rough downhills just fine. Yet I can put my foot down instantaneously any time I need to. They are also adjustable for tension.

    I say avoid the Candy pedals. My girlfriend went from old beat up Shimano's to the Candy C pedals and started falling without getting out. She also loves the M-647 and she is quite capable on some downhills that I have seen lots of guys walk.

  24. #24
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    OP, if you can't tell yet, the make and model of clipless pedals you choose are a matter of personal preference, as is clipless vs. other types of pedals. I switched to clipless about 1000 miles ago, and won't go back. However I suffered irreparable bodily injury (not to mention counltess close calls) to get where I am. It was a high price to pay. Best of luck to you!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    However I suffered irreparable bodily injury .......... to get where I am.
    Whoa! What happened?

  26. #26
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    I originally had the same idea of getting something with a platform. I got the Time Atac Z Control set. They were an alright set but hard to get out of most of the time and slip a lot when trying to lock back in. I got a pair of Eggbeater SL's about a week ago and prefer a full on clipless then trying to substitue something that is not going to happen.

    A pair of pedals that may actually do a platform for you would probably be something like the CB Mallets where are quite large and in charge.

    pink

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    Whoa! What happened?
    After a few months and hundreds of miles of experimenting, I still couldn't find the middle ground between releasing too easy and releasing too hard. I favored an easier release since some of my non-release crashes were pretty scary and should have been a lot worse than they were. BTW I like trails that push the limits of my technical abilities, so I'm in and out of the pedals a lot. (that's a gross understatement)

    Finally, things were going well and perhaps I got over-confident. I hopped off a small drop (really small) at speed, onto a muddy/grassy flat, as I've done dozens of times before. But this time, one foot came unclipped as I jumped. I landed off-balance and tried hard to recover while heading for a deep, rocky ditch. I fish-tailed a bit, and probably grabbed too much brake, but the ditch was fast approaching and I did what I could. I ended up taking a dive to avoid getting caught up in the bike and/or the ditch. Fortunately, I did separate from the the bike. But I over-rotated on the bail-out and landed squarely on my right shoulder with a loud crunching/ripping sound.

    Oddly enough, this happened at the very end of my ride, within a few dozen feet from my car. I quickly loaded my bike into my car, just barely before the swelling immobilized that arm. Then I headed home, and then to the doctor.

    The diagnosis was a shoulder separation. Technically, it's repairable with surgery, but that's not recommended, (nor covered by insurance) unless I was right handed AND a pro baseball pitcher, haha! So I'm stuck with a pronounced lump on my right shoulder and a lot of grinding noises when I move that arm.

    I'm 95% recovered in terms of mountain biking, but I still have some pain when bunny hopping or other situations where I need to pull up on the bars.

    I'm liking the clipless pedals for the secure footing they provide, and I now seem to be able to unclip when needed. But I still unclip prematurely at times. This has forced me to keep my wheels on the ground more than I used to, which is a bit of a bummer. I just tightened the release tension a little bit last weekend, and did fine on a long, non-technical ride. I just hope I'm ready when I get back to my local trails.

    Sorry for the long response. But you asked!!

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    After a few months and hundreds of miles of experimenting, I still couldn't find the middle ground between releasing too easy and releasing too hard. I favored an easier release since some of my non-release crashes were pretty scary and should have been a lot worse than they were. BTW I like trails that push the limits of my technical abilities, so I'm in and out of the pedals a lot. (that's a gross understatement)

    Finally, things were going well and perhaps I got over-confident. I hopped off a small drop (really small) at speed, onto a muddy/grassy flat, as I've done dozens of times before. But this time, one foot came unclipped as I jumped. I landed off-balance and tried hard to recover while heading for a deep, rocky ditch. I fish-tailed a bit, and probably grabbed too much brake, but the ditch was fast approaching and I did what I could. I ended up taking a dive to avoid getting caught up in the bike and/or the ditch. Fortunately, I did separate from the the bike. But I over-rotated on the bail-out and landed squarely on my right shoulder with a loud crunching/ripping sound.

    Oddly enough, this happened at the very end of my ride, within a few dozen feet from my car. I quickly loaded my bike into my car, just barely before the swelling immobilized that arm. Then I headed home, and then to the doctor.

    The diagnosis was a shoulder separation. Technically, it's repairable with surgery, but that's not recommended, (nor covered by insurance) unless I was right handed AND a pro baseball pitcher, haha! So I'm stuck with a pronounced lump on my right shoulder and a lot of grinding noises when I move that arm.

    I'm 95% recovered in terms of mountain biking, but I still have some pain when bunny hopping or other situations where I need to pull up on the bars.

    I'm liking the clipless pedals for the secure footing they provide, and I now seem to be able to unclip when needed. But I still unclip prematurely at times. This has forced me to keep my wheels on the ground more than I used to, which is a bit of a bummer. I just tightened the release tension a little bit last weekend, and did fine on a long, non-technical ride. I just hope I'm ready when I get back to my local trails.

    Sorry for the long response. But you asked!!
    Damn, sorry to here about that. I hope you get more of the remaining 5% back.

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