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Thread: Chain wear

  1. #1
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    Chain wear

    Hi guys,

    Recently Ive been noticing increasing chain noise & it its getting worse. Basically I can hear the chain going around all the time & it sounds like grit is in there.
    If I clean the drive chain & oil it, it sounds pretty smooth for about 10 mins, but the gritty sounds will come back soon enough.
    Ive noticed some clunks & slip sounds too, especially after coasting for a while & then peddling again I get a clunk or creak.

    (The indexing should be fine, Ive checked carefully & it seems optimal. I get noticeable chain catch if I adjust it too far in either direction from the current. I dont have any chain clicks from bad indexing right now in any gear.
    I understand 1x11 is more likely to rub in some gears, but im posting because the sounds & feeling im getting is much more than ive been used to for the past 10 months or so)

    I ride on the road most of the time, so its not as if the drive chain is actually dirty. Although it is super hot here right now. (30º~35º)

    I measured the chain links & it seems perfect with no stretch (25.4 cm / 10 inches exactly)

    I was thinking to buy a new chain & I understand I should replace the chain ring too in this case. Do you think it looks worn? I don't think so.

    The trouble is it seems 32T RF direct is totally sold out & may never be back, so I could move to 34T... hmm (27.5 11-speed)

    The noise is kind of annoying the hell out of me, so I want to resolve it.

    Many thanks for your advice.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Chain wear-img_3283.jpg  

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    Chain wear-img_3286.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Buy a chain wear checker or go to your lbs and get them to measure it. Using a ruler isn't very accurate. I'm guessing your chain is worn out but I'd also check the jockey wheels and make sure they're tight and clean.

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    Quote Originally Posted by warpdatframe View Post
    but I'd also check the jockey wheels and make sure they're tight and clean.
    Thats interesting because my feeling was that is where the noise is coming from, but.. its hard to be sure of course.
    Are jockey wheels something that wears out more often?

    SO. I removed, cleaned & re-greased the jockys.
    One of them had a lot of dark brown rusty grindy stuff in there. it wasnt rust because it cleaned up nice & shiny, but anyway.
    After riding in the street ~ it may have improved it a bit, but there is still gritty noise. So cant be sure until I ride it again properly.

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    You have wear on some of your cluster gear teeth and on the chainring. I'd replace them and the chain. I have had to replace the outer jockey wheel from wear. Also check that your hub bearings and pawls are working smoothly. Take off the wheel and move the hub off the bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by warpdatframe View Post
    Buy a chain wear checker or go to your lbs and get them to measure it.

    actually a ruler is a very accurate way to measure a chain.

    Cassette looks good to me, how many miles on it? The chainring looks a little worn but not too bad. What's your clean/lube method?

    If it were me I'd probably just replace the chain and see how it rolls on the cassette and ring.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You have wear on some of your cluster gear teeth and on the chainring. I'd replace them and the chain. I have had to replace the outer jockey wheel from wear. Also check that your hub bearings and pawls are working smoothly. Take off the wheel and move the hub off the bike.
    Whatchyatalkinbouteb1888, that drivetrain looks near pristine; if anything it's too new. An easy way to tell if the cassette is starting to wear is that the load-bearing side of the teeth start developing flanges as the metal plastically deforms rather than grinds away. I can see no evidence of this, but what I can see a little of is a few rough burrs that are remnants of the cog stamping-out process during manufacturing. These will cause a bit of noise and rough shifting until they get worn down. Cure: go out and ride.

    I'm not convinced of the effectiveness of chain checking tools for reasons too tedious to go into (some are better than others, that's for sure) and a rule isn't really suitable for accurate checking. I like to use a digital caliper - even a cheap $20 one should be good enough. For a 11-speed chain the max chain stretch spec is +0.5%, so set your caliper for 10.05" (or 255.27 mm) and measure 10 links of the chain when it's under a little bit of tension. Over 10 links there's only 1/20" (1.27 mm) between a new chain and a +0.5%-worn chain so best to measure pin-to-pin as there's not much margin for error.

    As to odd clunks etc., I reckon hanger alignment and cable stickiness would be good areas to investigate first. If they're OK then B-limit screw adjustment and RD bearing slop would be next to look into. It doesn't take much deviation from the ideal to throw out an 11-speed setup.
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    The only odd thing about the OP's description is the fact that it goes away, and comes back so quickly.

    If the noise is rhythmic, I'd have a look at the master link if you have one. Sometimes an ill-fitting quick link is just enough to introduce noise, and enough lube can hide it for a bit. Just one idea of many good ones here.

    @OP - Please post back if/when you find a fix. I hate when these threads die without any kind of resolution.

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    Wow...that's one pristine chain/drive setup! Mine only looks like that during installation day.

    Hard to tell visually if chain is toast but the cassette and chainring look fine to me. How many miles on the drivetrain?

    I would just try a chain and see if that helps. Also good advice by Grassington to check hangar alignment.
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    The only odd thing about the OP's description is the fact that it goes away, and comes back so quickly.
    Yeah that's what I thought too. Like Grassington said the chain almost looks too clean, maybe not enough lube?
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    I would say about 3000km+, (about 2000 miles)
    Ive cleaned it quite religiously. chain run through a de-greaser bath a few times a week. Soapy water & brush to clean off. Dry off water, & apply 1 chain rotation of lube. run through a rag. Try to make sure its not wet with lube, just lightly coated.
    Almost always ridden on road, a few farm tracks. Lots of steep hills.

    Im thinking it shouldnt be too bad because ive never ridden trails. Unfortunately its not possible where I live.

    I converted to tubeless about a month or so ago & after that i noticed more noise. I wondered if somehow it was caused by removing/replacing the wheel. but i dont see how. could be co-incidence.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    I would say about 3000km+, (about 2000 miles)

    No matter how good you took care of it or what the measurement is that's a lot of miles for a chain. I would replace it yesterday, hopefully it will run smooth on the cogs but you'll know one way or the other right away.
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    Quote Originally Posted by phlegm View Post
    If the noise is rhythmic, I'd have a look at the master link if you have one. Sometimes an ill-fitting quick link is just enough to introduce noise, and enough lube can hide it for a bit. Just one idea of many good ones here.
    Its not rhythmic, its continuous. To me it sounds just like a rough chain going around, like sand in the chain or something like that. I would say it sounds like its coming from the rear mech area more than the chainring.
    When I pedal slowly it seems almost fine, no noise, but as soon as i start to pedal faster (in any gear) the gritty noise increases.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    Ive cleaned it quite religiously. chain run through a de-greaser bath a few times a week. Soapy water & brush to clean off.
    That sounds very excessive and possibly the problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    No matter how good you took care of it or what the measurement is that's a lot of miles for a chain. I would replace it yesterday, hopefully it will run smooth on the cogs but you'll know one way or the other right away.
    oh ok! I wasnt sure. Thanks.
    I can order one from amazon & have it in a few days.
    I was thinking the KMC x11 super light. The one I have now is the regular X11.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    That sounds very excessive and possibly the problem.
    Could be. Some of the (top) videos on youtube say do it after every ride, others say once a month & run it though a rag only. Theres a lot of conflicting advice i notice on many topics. Im often not sure which is correct.
    Although, saying that the chain has been noise free for 8 months & only recently started getting noisy.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    Could be. Some of the (top) videos on youtube say do it after every ride, others say once a month & run it though a rag only. Theres a lot of conflicting advice i notice on many topics. Im often not sure which is correct.

    There is a lot of conflicting advice and honestly I don't think there's any one "right" way to do it. I like a clean chain and hate any type of drivetrain noise or friction so I wipe down my chain pretty much every ride. I never remove it though and never soak it in degreaser, just a rag with a little isopropyl alcohol on it and follow up with lube, then wipe down with clean rag. Soaking in degreaser can leave a chain gritty feeling IME.

    Anyway I think the main problem is just too many miles, chains are relatively cheap and keeping them fresh makes a huge difference.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    oh ok! I wasnt sure. Thanks.
    I can order one from amazon & have it in a few days.
    I was thinking the KMC x11 super light. The one I have now is the regular X11.
    https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/produ...-HG701-11.html
    The Sil-Tec coating reduces chain maintenance for me. It lasts.

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    Thank you everyone for your great advice.

    I ordered a new chain KMC X11EL (mid range one)

    I think I will chill-out on my cleaning efforts now :-)
    oh, when I said "bath" I meant the little hand held device, not removing the chain. but still, probably doing it too much.

  19. #19
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    I see you have a new chain on the way. Ditch the chain degreaser in favor of a dry rag and see how that works over the life of the chain.

  20. #20
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    Yeah. You want lube inside the chain. Excessive washing and degreasing it is likely removing the lube where you need it. And water and detergent in a chain instead of lube is especially bad. Apply lube liberally so it can wick into the links while turning the cranks backward a bunch of times. Then wipe off the external excess lube. I basically never clean my chains except of wiping off the excess lube and external gunk with it.
    Do the math.

  21. #21
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    If you aren't, allow the lube a few minutes to seep in before you wipe it down.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oh My Sack! View Post
    Remember, there's always quilting and knitting if pedalling becomes too tough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    I would say about 3000km+, (about 2000 miles)
    Ive cleaned it quite religiously. chain run through a de-greaser bath a few times a week. Soapy water & brush to clean off. Dry off water, & apply 1 chain rotation of lube. run through a rag. Try to make sure its not wet with lube, just lightly coated.
    Almost always ridden on road, a few farm tracks. Lots of steep hills.

    Im thinking it shouldnt be too bad because ive never ridden trails. Unfortunately its not possible where I live.
    As others have written, at 3k kms, it's time for a new chain any way. I like the full nickel plated KMC chains too -- they clean up nicely, don't rust and last a long time.

    I'm kind of a fanatical chain cleaning guy too, but a few times a week is too much cleaning - especially for road riding. Maybe there's rust on the inside of the rollers making the noise.

    My personal routine is to re-lube and wipe every 100kms or so of trail riding, and clean about every 2 weeks... conditions dependent of course.
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    I stepped up to the Shimano SIL-TEC coated chain, It's baked on and lasts.
    I ride this chain almost three times longer than any other. It makes my cassette last just as long.
    Bone dry, no lube this chain Is virtually silent. Takes about 1/3 the maintenance and far less lube, less is better here, always.

    Post and pre ride maintenance Is a simple rag wipe down.
    I use the Park chain scrubber now and then as needed but often I go 15 to 20 rides of 10-20 miles each between cleanings with only a post ride minimal relube as needed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Bone dry, no lube this chain Is virtually silent.

    Must be a lot different conditions there, that or maybe the 11 speed Shimano chains are a lot different than the 10 speed ones. I like Shimano (sil-tech) chains a lot but if I let mine get bone dry it's squeaky and creaky for sure. Any sort of drivetrain noise bugs me so I lube pretty much every ride.
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  25. #25
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    Anyone use Chain-L before? It seems to be very popular with road cyclists and mountain bikers.

    https://www.amazon.com/Chain-L-High-.../dp/B008TXAT4C
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    Quote Originally Posted by Battery View Post
    Anyone use Chain-L before? It seems to be very popular with road cyclists and mountain bikers.

    https://www.amazon.com/Chain-L-High-.../dp/B008TXAT4C
    Chain-L No. 5?

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    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    My personal routine is to re-lube and wipe every 100kms or so of trail riding, and clean about every 2 weeks... conditions dependent of course.
    ok, thanks. So im curious what you do about washing the bike. Surely you rinse off mud etc after a ride, & your chain/drive rinsed off. So then you just run the chain through a rag to dry off excess water & leave it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    ok, thanks. So im curious what you do about washing the bike. Surely you rinse off mud etc after a ride, & your chain/drive rinsed off. So then you just run the chain through a rag to dry off excess water & leave it?
    Me personally, I try to minimize washing for just this reason.... along with keeping water away from the bearings.

    When I do wash, I use a chain cleaning gizmo (Not sure which brand at the moment - Park maybe) with a citrus degreaser, dry with a towel, air dry a bit longer, lube and let it soak in a bit, and wipe off the excess.

    Everyone has their favorite lube, but I like Finish Line Dry Lube Spray with Teflon because I ride dusty gravel forest roads to commute or to get to the single tracks.

    I relube after about 3 rides depending on the conditions... letting the oil dry over night to try to hopefully attract less dust.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    That sounds very excessive and possibly the problem.
    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    I would say about 3000km+, (about 2000 miles)
    Ive cleaned it quite religiously. chain run through a de-greaser bath a few times a week. Soapy water & brush to clean off. Dry off water, & apply 1 chain rotation of lube. run through a rag. Try to make sure its not wet with lube, just lightly coated.
    Almost always ridden on road, a few farm tracks. Lots of steep hills.
    Why are you degreasing your chain? ...and why a few times a week?
    That is far too excessive, and too deep a clean-out. You should be using dry teflon lube, so that dirt and dust does not stick to your chain and sprockets in the first place. Oil is generally a dirt/dust magnet.

    For my mountain bikes, the only time that I deep clean my drivetrains is after I am riding through muddy conditions where the mud is caking on. I will sometimes also do that at the beginning of the season to make sure everything is OK prior to starting the year. And ever then, with the dry teflon lube, there is never a need to degrease a chain. I only use soapy water with a brush, dry it out, re-lube, and let the lube dry out overnight before going out for the next ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    Why are you degreasing your chain? ...and why a few times a week?
    Basically because videos like GCN & GMBN say you should keep it clean & de-grease it. So I did.
    But it seems that I misunderstood how often that should be. People say clean your bike after every ride, I assumed that also meant the chain.

    If you listen to the first 10 seconds of videos like this, then you can see why I thought to clean it often.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM6mzE5lQ0w

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvKcsMg8TJc

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    Basically because videos like GCN & GMBN say you should keep it clean & de-grease it. So I did.
    But it seems that I misunderstood how often that should be. People say clean your bike after every ride, I assumed that also meant the chain.

    If you listen to the first 10 seconds of videos like this, then you can see why I thought to clean it often.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM6mzE5lQ0w

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OvKcsMg8TJc
    Don't feel bad, I know I did the same thing when I started (just a couple of years ago)
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    The first video is not on a mountain bike so completely ignore the advice given there because the lube used there is completely different.

    The second video was still excessive in my opinion. If I ride in very muddy conditions, I just use a brush to clean the excess off. If the drivetrain feels "crunchy" (as it sometimes sounds and feels like a bit of grinding sand or dirt) then I wash it lightly with a brush, soap and water, let it dry, and lube it back up.

    Do not get soap or lube anywhere near your disk brakes! There is absolutely nothing wrong with having some dirt on a mountain bike. There is also no need to scrub your MTB to immaculate clean after every ride.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    You have wear on some of your cluster gear teeth and on the chainring. I'd replace them and the chain. I have had to replace the outer jockey wheel from wear. Also check that your hub bearings and pawls are working smoothly. Take off the wheel and move the hub off the bike.
    And send all that "worn out" stuff to me. Sorry that stuff looks just fine. The cassette looks near new. The black finish on a chain ring will look like that after 100 miles...or less.

    As to others comments to get a chain checker, a ruler is MORE accurate. The space between the roller and the pin can make a chain checker read worn when it is still okay. To use a ruler, consider that each chain link is 1/2". Using a 12" ruler on a chain pulled straight, if the last link is more than 1/16" past the end of the 12" mark then it's time to replace the chain.

    You do not need to replace chainring(s) and/or cassettes with every chain change. The chain and gears do not "wear into each other" to the point where a fresh chain will hurt existing rings or cassettes.

    Cleaning a chain is not a bad thing but it need not be pristine. When I want to clean my chain I remove it from the bike. I use a chain breaker and then a reusable quick link to reinstall. The chain goes in a glass jar with some mineral spirits. A quick soak (a couple minutes) and shake will clean the chain. This cleans the chain down between the plates and pins...where a chain wears. When done I cap the jar and reuse the mineral spirits several times. If the mineral spirits gets really gritty I will filter it using a coffee filter. When it gets too dirty it gets recycled with old engine oil.

    Once clean let it dry then you MUST re-lube the chain.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    The first video is not on a mountain bike so completely ignore the advice given there because the lube used there is completely different.


    I've always used the same cleaning techniques and the same lube for both road and mountain, just less often for the road bike.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  35. #35
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    I'll say the one time I washed my bike and forgot to lube my chain it was the worst experience of my life. About halfway through my ride I heard what could only be described as a Gremlin living in my rear hub, cassette or bottom bracket. It was VERY loud and very gravelly sounding. I really had no idea a chain could make that much noise and surely could tell if a chain had been properly lubed in the future just from that experience.

    WTBS, your chain is shot and it doesn't look like you use enough or the proper lube. My drivetrain never looks that clean and it's smooth as butter when it's properly lubed.



    I'll also recommend changing a chain even more frequently with the new(ish) aluminum cassette cogs on the larger cogs. I've had to replace one cassette already with only about 500 miles on it because of that. Every gear was fine with the new chain except the aluminum one. It would pop and skip when pedaled hard. Hopefully you'll get luck and that one will be OK.
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  36. #36
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    To the OP, one thing that might be worth checking is for any play in your bottom bracket. I had some annoying drivetrain noises that seemed to only be noticeable under load, and got worse under heavier load. Tried everything to sort it out, but no luck. I eventually bit the bullet and dropped it off at a good LBS (same one I bought it from) and they found the issue and fixed it (without even a charge... treated it as part of the free 'maintenance' that they include in bike purchases.)

    Long story short, the preload adjuster on the crank wasn't keeping enough pressure on the spindle and against the BB, so the cranks developed a slight play, but it was enough to still tweak the chain line and create noises that really annoyed the shit out of me.

    Probably a little less of an issue on 11sp vs 12sp, but still worth a quick check if you haven't already.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    No matter how good you took care of it or what the measurement is that's a lot of miles for a chain. I would replace it yesterday, hopefully it will run smooth on the cogs but you'll know one way or the other right away.
    2,000 miles for a chain ridden mainly on the road is not too bad. 3,000 is typical for a road bike. Neither the cogs nor chainring show any shark fin type wear. They should work fine with a new chain.

    The fool proof way to measure a chain is to take the chain off and compare it to a new chain. I have a finish nail on the edge of a shelf. I can hang both chains side by side. If the old chain is 1/2 link (1/4") longer than the same number of links on the new chain then it is time to replace. That equates to about 1/16" over 12".

  38. #38
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    Well my new chain & chainring arrived. I went to the LBS but they dont have the right tools for Race face cinch. They wanted to keep the bike in & make me walk 10km back home, but I insisted they reassemble the cranks.
    I did tell them BBT-22 tool was needed before starting, but it didn't sink in i guess.

    Now I have to buy the tool & wait a few weeks before trying again.
    (ahh luckily they had 1 left on amazon for $25, I can get it in a few days hopefully)

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    How dafuq does a bike shop not have that tool? That's like going to a car repair shop and they don't have a socket set.

    Time to pick a new shop...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thoreau View Post
    How dafuq does a bike shop not have that tool? That's like going to a car repair shop and they don't have a socket set.

    Time to pick a new shop...
    Its a daily ordeal living on a remote pacific island. 🤪

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Must be a lot different conditions there, that or maybe the 11 speed Shimano chains are a lot different than the 10 speed ones. I like Shimano (sil-tech) chains a lot but if I let mine get bone dry it's squeaky and creaky for sure. Any sort of drivetrain noise bugs me so I lube pretty much every ride.
    The only lube that counts Is whats Inside the rollers, My 'Bone Dry' comment means I feel no lube when I run a bare hand over the chain.

    So I guess Technically I don't actually run bone dry :P

    Any lube on the outside is just a sand magnet, a grinding paste ~~~
    Most every chain I see on peoples bikes is over lubed.
    Just sayin
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Most every chain I see on peoples bikes is over lubed.
    Just sayin

    Not over lubed, just under wiped. I agree that most peoples chains I see are a mess because of that. Also agree that lube on the outside of the chain is a dirt magnet but IME it's inevitable that some will be there. I apply Dumonde Tech fairly liberally but always wipe it clean and dry as practical, not a fan of grungy chains.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    The only lube that counts Is whats Inside the rollers, My 'Bone Dry' comment means I feel no lube when I run a bare hand over the chain.

    So I guess Technically I don't actually run bone dry :P

    Any lube on the outside is just a sand magnet, a grinding paste ~~~
    Most every chain I see on peoples bikes is over lubed.
    Just sayin
    Two problems with these statements:

    First off. Your chain is "clean" and "dry" of grit on the outside. What about all that shit that gets inside the chain between the pins and rollers? Where's that going? Nowhere. It's grinding away at the chain in the worst possible spot. There's no such thing as a clean chain except the one that comes out of the box brand new.

    Second thing. Where's all that lube go that's in your rollers on your "dry" chain? Is there some magic black hole in between the roller and the pin that sucks it up thereby necessitating you relube it? No. It gets squeezed and flung out of there when you ride. If your chain is dry after you ride, then it didn't actually have any lube in it. I wipe mine twice, once after I lube before I ride and once after. And all that lube that forced out of the chain collects dirt and forms turds of gunk all over the place which you then need to remove.

    If your chain looks like the pictures above it's a) brand new b) just been washed and never ridden but still has shit on the inside that you can't see c) has never been properly lubed.
    Life is too short to ride a bike you don't love.

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    Quote Originally Posted by l'oiseau View Post
    If your chain looks like the pictures above it's a) brand new b) just been washed and never ridden but still has shit on the inside that you can't see c) has never been properly lubed.


    I don't know about that, it doesn't look brand new to me and you can see black lines around the side plate so it must be getting some lube. I'm not a fan of removing and degreasing chains but even without removing them they can be kept pretty clean with a little care if that's what you want.

    Mine don't look quite that nice but they're not far off, if I bothered to take a little more time and use compressed air they'd look about like the one in the op's pic.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  45. #45
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    Chains arent metric btw. Its 12 inches for 12 links. Replace at 12 1/16th, ruined by 12 1/8th.

    The ruler method is by *far* the most accurate and consistent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Chains arent metric btw. Its 12 inches for 12 links. Replace at 12 1/16th, ruined by 12 1/8th.

    The ruler method is by *far* the most accurate and consistent.
    Thanks. Yes, I realise they are inches & I had to do a conversion. I don't have a ruler in inches & they are simply not sold here. I guess I could order one online.
    Japan is totally metric, nothing is imperial measurements & no one has any concept of what they are. (Although saying that they do measure rooms in tatami mat sizes, which is crazy but easy to visualise.)

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    You're lucky! I wish we used metric. The only thing imperial is good for, is measuring chains.

    There's been some over the top chain maintenance threads over the years. Im still big on prolink! If it's easy, I think more people will do it often. Doesn't get much easier than prolink.

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    deleted (my mistake)
    Last edited by Riquez; 08-24-2018 at 06:34 PM.

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    New chain, but same problem & same noise. So I guess over-cleaning chain was not the issue.

    B-screw seems ok. In the large cog there is reasonable gap, but its close. I moved it closer but shifting seemed to jam a bit, so I think that distance is ok.

    Who would think 1 person could have so much problem swapping a chain.

    To make matters worse, now I have the BBT-22 I still cant remove the chain ring. That thing is on so tight I ripped the vice off the bench & it still didn't budge.

    I will see if the bike shop can replace the chain ring now I have the tool & hopefully they can find the source of the noise too.



    Bike shop was finally able to change the chain ring, it took 3 of them about 20 mins to remove it.
    Absolutely no difference in the sound.

    The bike shop people said its the normal sound, they couldnt understand what I was on about. To me this is not normal because up till now it has been silent, the only sound when riding is the sound of rubber rolling. Now all I can hear is this whirring of pulley wheels.
    Last edited by Riquez; 08-25-2018 at 12:32 AM.

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    Well, i'm a noob myself and ended up driving many miles across two trips to my local shop just to find out my own recent issue was a simple matter of the b tension screw, which i completely forgot to look at (despite tweaking everything from the barrel adjuster to realigning the hanger.)

    That said, it's hard to tell from the video, but that sounds to me like the guide pulley meeting the cassette, or at least being very close to it. I've noticed that if it's too close, even the tiniest of misalignment in the indexing can make quite a racket as the chain transitions from the guide pulley to the cassette.

    Only other time I had that much noise coming from the rear end was when i routed the chain incorrectly in the cage and it was dragging over a metal bit between the inner and outer cage plates.

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    FIXED !!!

    It was the pulley wheels 😮
    I replaced them & the whole drive train instantly became silent. wow.
    Well it cost me about ¥16,000 to finally discover that ($150)

    To be honest it did always sound like that is where the noise was coming from, but i didnt beleive it. they dont look worn at all. These are the old ones...Chain wear-ba8aff80-7b0c-4a8c-a4ee-76a3c4f86174.jpg

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    Ahh looks like I spoke too soon. After riding around for 20 mins its still there when I ride faster.
    Its much better I think, but still there. Now I begin to wonder how impartial I can be assessing what is acceptable as ive ben obsessed by solving it for weeks. I can hear that sound in my dreams now - LOL

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    Right right right! it IS FIXED. (really honstly! haha)

    I just did a 30km ride & the sound was minimal, but still a bit.
    I noticed gear changes were slightly clunky, but not awful. I could feel it in my feet & hear it.

    I got home & ignored all the advice & cleaned the chain again (its a new one, never cleaned)
    Now its perfect. 100% silent. Gear changes are silk smooth, you can barely know any thing happened other than the slightest tick.

    I feel this is now like when the bike was new.

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    Outstanding! Derailleur pulleys are usually the most neglected an under-serviced parts of the drivetrain. Luckily replacements for these pulleys are fairly inexpensive and easy to work on.

    Road riders are notorious for being meticulous with their chain maintenance and cleaning, because they do not want to lose the 1 - 2 watts from a dirty drivetrain. That can lose them the race because of the speeds and distance that they often ride. They very often take everything apart, degrease, and lube the hell out of it all.

    For mountain bikes not so much. We are more concerned with not using wet lubes that will attract dirt and dust. However, we do wear chain and drivetrains faster from muddier and dustier conditions. Wipe them clean with a brush and re-lube with dry teflon lube. Let it dry overnight before going on the next ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    We are more concerned with not using wet lubes that will attract dirt and dust.
    My local bike shop applied some lube when I had the chain ring replaced. I also asked them for a recommended lube & they sold me wet. I thought that was wrong at the time, but who am i to say, they are the experts.
    So I used that wet lube.
    After cleaning today, I thought, this isn't right. Where I live is dry & hot. I applied my old brand dry lube.

    I think that local shop is useless, every time i go there they dont seem to know what they are doing, i have to provide tools. But I think they just dont know anything about MTB & are also a little scared of foreigners. Everything is road bikes here.
    It sucks for me because without that shop I have nowhere to go within reasonable distance.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    My local bike shop applied some lube when I had the chain ring replaced. I also asked them for a recommended lube & they sold me wet. I thought that was wrong at the time, but who am i to say, they are the experts.
    So I used that wet lube.
    After cleaning today, I thought, this isn't right. Where I live is dry & hot. I applied my old brand dry lube.

    There's not really a universal definition of what a "wet" lube is but even though I live in a dry and dusty climate I mostly prefer the wet ones due to the fact that I can barely make it through a single ride without drivetrain noise when using most dry lubes.

    I don't know what the shop sold you but I don't think they were necessarily wrong in selling you a "wet" lube, some of them are really good and with a little care you can still keep a clean drivetrain when using them.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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    The cycle (ha ha) continues.

    After another week or so of not cleaning & just wiping down with a rag, I found the noise has been increasing more & more. Now its just loud as heck, worse than ever. I can hear it when riding with my earphones in & music playing!

    I had to degrease & lube again to see the result. The noise is immediately gone.
    So it looks like I am stuck in the position of having noise or cleaning often.

    (or turning up the volume )

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riquez View Post
    After another week or so of not cleaning & just wiping down with a rag...
    Are you applying oil before you wipe? Just checking...
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    Whatever you are using for lube must be completely unsuitable for where you ride. What are you using? What have you tried? I only use Finish Line Dry Teflon Lube. They also have a "Ceramic Wax" lube that is supposed to be even better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J_Westy View Post
    Are you applying oil before you wipe? Just checking...
    Sometimes I have just wiped only to remove any excess. At first I noticed a lot of black lube on the chain after riding, so just a wipe.
    In the last few days, I would apply a bit extra lube, spin the chain, let it sit for a few mins, then wipe lightly. Before the next ride I would check it wasnt overly lubed & maybe give a quick wipe.

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    Quote Originally Posted by blundar View Post
    Whatever you are using for lube must be completely unsuitable for where you ride. What are you using? What have you tried? I only use Finish Line Dry Teflon Lube. They also have a "Ceramic Wax" lube that is supposed to be even better.
    Up until now I have been using AZ multipurpose chain lube. Ive had no issues with it.
    https://www.amazon.co.jp/gp/product/B00AA68F9M

    Since this problem started & this thread I tried using Finish Line Wet that the bike shop sold me. I felt there was excessive amounts of black lube over everything & coming out of the chain after a ride. The gold chain was basically black. So I stopped using that & went back to AZ.

    Next time I order from Amazon I will get the Finish Line Dry. Although I dont really feel this is the issue as I was using AZ just fine for at least 6 months before.

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    I am wondering if the freehub is the issue & chain cleaning / fresh lube is masking it for a short time.
    I am getting some clunks that seems like chain slip, but perhaps that is the free hub slipping or something.
    Today rolling on a new road, I thought I could feel some gritty vibration getting into my feet & hands when just coasting. It was quite subtle.

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    I did a quick search for "AZ multipurpose chain lube" and it does not look like it is all too common a brand. I honestly think that the lube you are using is the problem.

    I would still recommend a dry lube. Dry chain lube has been used by motorcycle and motocross bikes for decades very successfully.

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