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  1. #1
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    chain popping in an out of gear

    It's pretty much a brand new '07 Trek Fuel EX6 as I've only ridden it maybe 3-4 times so far.

    Today the chain starts slipping off the rear cassette or something I guess. I'm not exactly sure what's happening.

    It doesn't slip to a different gear. It's staying on the same gear.

    Also, there has been a rubbing noise coming from the rear of the bike since I bought it.

    Should I take it to the store to get checked or does the chain just need to be tightened or something?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Looks like the cable tension needs to be adjusted. Anyway,the shop normally gives at least one free tune up after purchase(often more), so you'd better just let them do the job and try to learn from the mechanic how to do it yourself.

  3. #3
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    Chains don't need tightened. The rear derailleur takes care of that.

    IF your bike shifted properly when it was brand new, I am almost 100% certain you just need to increase the tension in the rear shifter just a TINY bit. The metal inner cable has stretched a millimeter or two. You need to make the inner cable shorter in relation to the cable housing. Turn the barrel adjuster at the rear derailleur or rear shifter COUNTERCLOCKWISE 1/4 turn. Check it out, if a no-go, go another 1/4 turn.

    Your LBS will fix this for free, but it is an easy fix once you figure out how the derailleurs work. Take it in for an adjustment, or for a lifetime of freedom and enlightenment, learn to tune your drivetrain yourself.

    Link to enlightenment http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=64

  4. #4
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    Sounds to me like a classic case of cable stretch. Don't worry about it, it's just part of the break-in process with new bikes. You'll need to take up the slack in your rear derailleur cable by turning your barrel adjuster by the shifter. Your bike shop should of told you about this and explained how to do it because it's not too difficult. Refer to parktool.com or expertvillage on youtube might explain it too.

    As far as the rubbing, that could be a number of things. Can you narrow the location down a bit?

  5. #5
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    Also, make sure the chain is well lubed. My wife's new bike had this exact problem, the chain would skip but not change gears. Naturally I thought cable stretch, so I adjusted the tension, to no avail. Turned out it wasn't the cable tension, instead somehow the chain had gone dry. Applied lube and presto, no more skipping.

  6. #6
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    I know my LBS has people bring their bikes back in after about a month or so or 100 miles of riding if you ride a lot and they re-adjust and tighten everything after the initial break in period.

    Many shops do basic tune ups for the 1st or 2nd years you own your bike.

  7. #7
    Carpe Noctem
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    Make sure the wheel is fully seated in the dropouts, open the quick release, push down on the saddle and then close the quick release while holding the saddle down. If the wheel isn't seated it could cause poor shifting and brake rub.
    Off season? What off season?

  8. #8
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    Wow, thanks for the all of the replies. When I get the chance, I will go through each of the troubleshooting scenarios that you all posted and let you all know how it went. Thanks again.

  9. #9
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    Look through some of the tutorials online about basic bicycle maintenance as well so that when something happens you have an idea of what might be wrong. This can save you a lot of time and possibly some rides (What if something's going wrong the day before you're planning on riding again? No time to post online and wait for a response then fix it.).

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trimen1000
    Look This can save you a lot of time and possibly some rides (What if something's going wrong the day before you're planning on riding again? No time to post online and wait for a response then fix it.).
    Ouch! And there it is...I knew this thread was too good to be true! lol...good technical advice just wouldn't be complete without the lesson in common sense. lol.

    However, I am grateful all the same.

  11. #11
    Rod
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    Can you tell us more about this rubbing noise? Where is it coming from?
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rod
    Can you tell us more about this rubbing noise? Where is it coming from?
    Well, if I had to guess, I would say it's coming from the bearing. It sounds like some dirt got into the bearing. That's just a crazy guess. But, when I try to put the sound into words, that's what I come up with.

    Actually, it sounds very much like the noise it made when I brought my first '07 fuel ex6 back to the LBS, who told me that it was something that needed tightening, which they then proceeded to do. The guy tightened something around the back wheel area. That's all I remember.

    That first '07 fuel ex6 blew the front shocks in a couple of weeks of very light riding. That plus the tightening issue landed me the second '07 fuel ex6 , which the LBS built right out of the box so that I wouldn't have to wait for the front shocks on the first bike to be fixed.

    I appreciate the interest. Hope that was descriptive enough.

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