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  1. #1
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    Can't click in to clipless pedals

    I just bought a new pair of Crank Bros Candy C pedals and a pair of Shimano MT70 shoes. I am pretty sure I installed everything correctly and I am having a heck of a time trying to clip into the pedals. I can clip in holding the shoe in my hand, but in a half hour of trying I was only able to click in handful of times (this is just one shoe at a time). I did use the shims, and there doesn't seem to be any more significant trend interference. I have tried following the instructions for all the possible ways to click in.

    I thought these were supposed to be easy to get into. Any ideas?

  2. #2
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    I use the Candy's on my commuter as well as several others in the eggbeater series on my fs. They should be pretty easy to clip in. How is the angle of the cleats on the bottom of the shoe? Sometimes, you need to adjust those to be able to clip in. Also, sometimes you have to roll the inner part of the pedal using your shoe to get to the part of the spring where the cleat can clip in.

    I hope that helps, but I am betting some others will have better ideas.
    fill what's empty, empty what's full, and scratch where it itches.

  3. #3
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    I have the candy bros. Smarty (similar to yours but less expensive and, evidently more cheaply made) and am still new to clipless. My best advice, practice, practice, practice(Preferably on grass or in a trainer). I had a ride a few weeks ago where I couldn't clip in for almost the whole 5 mile loop(had one side sometimes, but both only once). I am new to clipless too and hadn't ridden in a few weeks so going on the trail was probably a bad idea but... When I got home, I put my bike on my trainer and practiced for about an hour of clipping in and out. When on the trainer(or with your brakes on while standing), I really focused on trying to feel the front of the clip push forward and then pushed my foot down. I hear it gets to be second-nature but, again, I'm still new! The last two rides I have had very few problems. I did switch back to flats to try for a day and went right back to clipless. The added power from upward motion was too good! Good luck and keep practicing!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwmtb
    I have the candy bros. Smarty (similar to yours but less expensive and, evidently more cheaply made) and am still new to clipless. My best advice, practice, practice, practice(Preferably on grass or in a trainer). I had a ride a few weeks ago where I couldn't clip in for almost the whole 5 mile loop(had one side sometimes, but both only once). I am new to clipless too and hadn't ridden in a few weeks so going on the trail was probably a bad idea but... When I got home, I put my bike on my trainer and practiced for about an hour of clipping in and out. When on the trainer(or with your brakes on while standing), I really focused on trying to feel the front of the clip push forward and then pushed my foot down. I hear it gets to be second-nature but, again, I'm still new! The last two rides I have had very few problems. I did switch back to flats to try for a day and went right back to clipless. The added power from upward motion was too good! Good luck and keep practicing!
    Not just that, but maintaining a constant power while out of the saddle is my number one reason for having my clipless. Practicing is important to get a feel for it. I remember it took me 15 minutes to just get one of my shoes in on a spin bike. After that I was flying!

  5. #5
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    You might need to trim some of the tread from the bottom of your shoes the part that sits over the platfom of the pedal. I had to do it to my Sidi's. I used and Xacto knife and it worked well. These are the easiest pedals to clip in and out of that I have used. I rode Time pedals for years then switched to the Candy SL's as of two years ago and love them.

  6. #6
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    take your shoes (off your feet) and try to snap it in ... look where its hanging up and fix it ... xacto knife like the last guy mentioned is likley the solution...

    enjoy the new found power and stability with your new pedals
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  7. #7
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    Like was said, try trimming the sole of the shoe so that the cleat does not have any resistance.

    Might have Left and Right specific cleats? I'm not familiar with Crank Bros.

  8. #8
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    trimming the tread a little helped me,still isnt 2nd nature yet but getting better every ride.

    before i got mine i kept hearing the horror stories of getting out,im glad i don't have that problem...it's getting in that was rough for a bit. i'm shure i'll have my (i could'nt clip out and bit it) story . i'll keep y'all posted on that one .

    the power is amazing ,and with me just getting back into it i need all the help i can get

  9. #9
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    It took me a few hours to learn how to clip in and out effortlessly - at first it seemed impossible (literally), but once I learned the body mechanics, it became pretty much second nature.

    I learned on pavement (dumb move). I suggest leaning against a wall while you learn.

    Definitely check to make sure your tread is not in the way.

  10. #10
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    quick question. Why do they call them clipless pedals? Arent there clips that screw into the shoes that snap into the pedals? I am new to this sport also and have been looking at getting a set up too. thanks

  11. #11
    Fat boy Mod Moderator
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    back in the day we rode with toe clips... so the lingo was clipless as you rode without the clips around your foot... ironic as you "clip in" with clipless haha

    there are some good threads on the subject if you search...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  12. #12
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    This is a clipped pedal:



    The clips that you are referring to on the bottom of the shoes are called cleats. Make sure that when you do get a clipless setup, that you make sure to get quality shoes because those will have to last you a longer time then the pedals, and it makes a great difference in feel/comfort.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for all the advise. I practiced again and I am starting to get the hang of it. I think a bit more practice and I will try to take the bike out for a ride. I guess I wasn't expecting the clicking in would take practice. I t was the clicking out that I was worried about.

  14. #14
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    Make sure you have the proper cleat in the proper foot. The cleats are right and left foot specific.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SenorSlacker
    Make sure you have the proper cleat in the proper foot. The cleats are right and left foot specific.
    No, they're not.

  16. #16
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    When I first switched over to the clipless pedals - Crank Bros EggBeaters, I tried learning while stationary, leaning against a wall, in the garage. Bad move - Had a bruised knee for weeks.

    After looking online here at mtbr.com, I found a simple piece of advice: DON'T THINK ABOUT CLIPPING IN, JUST DO IT

    It was amazing... as soon as I no longer concetrated on clipping in, and instead just started pedalling, it became so much easier to get locked in. Sure, I still had to line up the cleat with the clip, but the simple motion of pedalling will clip you in 95% of the time.

    Hope this helps...

    Peter

  17. #17
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    Part of what makes the Candies the Candies is that the eggbeater-like bit in the middle spins around inside the rails. If it is spun so that you are in a less-than-ideal position over the eggbeater, you won't be able to get in. The thinking around that free spin is that the eggbeater ought to respond to you standing on it by spinning around to the correct position. The problem is, sometimes brand-new Candies are a little stiff, and don't like to spin. Plus, the spring is at its strongest when brand new.

    The solution is, as everyone else has said, to practice. Not only to coordinate your feet, but to break in the pedals. If you reach down and find that it's NOTICEABLY difficult to spin the innards, you can apply some light lube like tri-flo, and the spin it around by hand to work it in. I had the exact same problem as you did the first time out, and I've been using clipless for years. The above solved my problem. When my girlfriend went to Crank Bros, it solved her problems, too.

    Enjoy your pedals!

  18. #18
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    what would be a better pedal for a new rider? Crank Brothers Egg Beaters, Or Candies?

  19. #19
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    psychologically i'd guess the candies... gives you that platform...

    that being said... i've only ever used SPD's...
    - Surly Disc trucker
    - '82 trek 560 roadie

  20. #20
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    SPD's are nice. Its pretty much preference. If you go to spin classes, they use SPD's, just to point it out.

  21. #21
    i call it a kaiser blade
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    SPD shoes don't play well with any crank bros product.

    i used to run egg beaters before switching over to SPDs.

    there's a night and day difference between ease of clipping in and out. i also like how the instruction manual in my ACID crank bros pedals said that unclipping will become easier once the pedal breaks in, whereas on the shimanos you can adjust a screw.

    :|

    i also ruined a perfectly good pair of shoes trimming the soles like crank bros recommends because they can't make a pedal that isn't retarded.

  22. #22
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    eat_dirt. I like your honesty on the advise about trimming the shoes. Who would want to do that for crank brothers when there are so many other choices out there? Crank brothers just looked so simple vs some of the other brands.

  23. #23
    i call it a kaiser blade
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marin??
    eat_dirt. I like your honesty on the advise about trimming the shoes. Who would want to do that for crank brothers when there are so many other choices out there? Crank brothers just looked so simple vs some of the other brands.
    my frustration stems from the fact that crank bros are not forthcoming about the fact that their pedals are not compatible with SPD MTB shoes, or similar products that have the deep groove in the sole that's meant to channel the "frog" cleat into the pedal. they do work with more classic 'roadie' shoes that have no tread on the sole and are essentially an exposed cleat--but instead of saying clearly "crank bros products are not compatible with SPD" shoes, they dance around the issue by saying that you can trim your shoes with an xacto knife.

    why would anyone in their right mind want to do that when you can get an adjustable SPD pedal for the same amount of money that has no such headaches. i'm not a shimano fanboy and i typically don't run their components, but i'll just state my two cents that the SPD pedals are the most user friendly in the industry after running all other options from egg beaters to platforms.

  24. #24
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    I've used Shimano, Time, and Crank Bros pedals. I've ridden Shimano, Scott, Specialized, Northwave, and Nike mtn shoes. I've found that the pedal is usually innocent, it's usually how much tread the shoe company puts on the shoe, and how much open room around the cleat mount area is there. I've had to trim shoes before with every pedal i've ridden. I'd suggest looking at new shoes, that are more open, or feature less tread around the cleat mount. I'm no fan of Crank Bros, but just wanted to ad my 2 cents.

  25. #25
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    Crank Bros pedals don't work with SPD shoes? Huh? They work no better or worse that any other pedal. There is ALWAYS a possibility that you will need to do some slight trimming in order to make your pedals mate up to your shoes correctly. That possibility gets higher as you complicate the situation by adding platform. The more platform, the more area for possible pedal/shoe mis-fit. This is true for Candy, Smarty, Acid, and Mallet pedals as it is for any of the myriad of SPD pedals with platforms.

    As for the Shimano style pedals being adjustable: that's one of the reasons I switched off of them. In order to keep my foot attached to the pedal, I had to crank the screw in far enough that getting my foot out was not such a sure thing. With Crank Bros, I can pull until my shoe creaks without popping out, and after 2 or 3 hours of riding, it's as easy to get in and out as it was with the easiest setting on my Shimanos. I see it as the best of both worlds.

    Also, we're skipping the REASON Eggbeaters were invented: Ease of operation, and operation in the mud.

    I have yet to miss clipping into my eggbeaters because they were not oriented correctly on the spindle. I just step on the pedal, and I'm in. Up until my last day with Shimano's, I would regularly have to spin them into the right spot. Not a big deal on a flat, but if you're trying to climb from a stop, that extra time spent fooling around can cost you.

    Now for where the eggbeaters REALLY shine: I was riding in clay mud yesterday, and had more than an inch and a half of it stuck on my shoe at one point. No problem. Just squished my foot onto the pedal, the mud vented out of it, and I clipped right in. With SPD style pedals, even a moderate amount of mud can plug up the works.

    So, what's the best pedal for a beginner? I think that the Eggbeater is the way to go. It's totally hassle-free, has less interference with shoes because there is no platform, and it doesn't take as much work to break in as a Candy, Smarty, or Acid. The lack of adjustment screw(s) means that there is one (four) fewer thing(s) for the beginner to worry about. The only thing to be careful of is mounting the correct cleat on the correct foot for earlier release, but that's hardly an issue if you just read the directions. In fact, if you're buying your pedals at your LBS, many of them will be happy to throw your cleats on your shoes for you. Even if the cleats are "Backwards", they'll still work - you'll just be twisting a little farther to get out.

  26. #26
    i call it a kaiser blade
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    and all the reasons you like eggbeaters are the ones i hate them. they're too simple and can't be tweaked for personal preference.

    i like being able to buy a shoe and not fret if it'll fit with my pedals or that i'm going to have to waste an evening trimming, clipping, trimming, clipping until the pedal actually snaps in place when i know that any SPD shoes (even ones i get off the internet) will fit with my pedals without having to trim or mess around with the fit.

    and i've had one get real loose with war and the other remain tight for no good reason. and there's nothing you can really do about that since i can't adjust the loose pedal.

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