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Thread: Bike squeaking?

  1. #1
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    Bike squeaking?

    I bought a new Kona Cinder Cone approximately three weeks ago with Hayes Sole hydraulic disks. I've only put about 200 to 300 km on it. When I got back from a ride yesterday I noticed that there was a high-pitched squeaking noise coming from the front tire area of my bike when I rolled it forwards. The squeak seems to occur at a specific point in the rotation of the tire; for example, if I rock the front tire back and forth, an inch or two, at a specific point, it will continuously make the sharp high-pitch squeak.

    It's rather difficult to judge over the internet, but does anybody have any idea what this might be? I doesn't appear that I bent anything. Does something need lubrication?

    Maybe I'll take it back to the LBS to see what they have to say. It, the squeaking, is really aggravating if nothing else.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Eric Hoefer's Avatar
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    Most likely your rotor is a tiny bit out of true (nothing to really worry about) and it could be slightly rubbing. Look at where your brake rotors touch your pads it could be just barely touching causing them to make a squeal. I have Hayes MX-2 mechanicals on my bike which use the same pads/rotors as your brakes and they tend to squeal a bit if theres a little rub.
    Hiking is just walking where its okay to pee... Sometimes old people go hiking by accident. -Demetri Martin-

  3. #3
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    You're probably right because the front wheel seems fine. I'll still have to take it in though because I haven't a clue how to straighten the rotor if that's the problem. I'm nothing if I'm not "mechanically challenged".

  4. #4
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    My bike makes a super high pitched squeal in the rear tire, however its only if there is weight on the bike. It took forever to figure out what it is, but then I noticed that the squeal goes away when I even so much as lightly feather the rear brake. I took a Torx wrench to the torx bolts on my rotor and tightened em all up and it disappeared.

    You might wanna give that a try, though its most likely not your issue.
    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ThisIsMyName
    You're probably right because the front wheel seems fine. I'll still have to take it in though because I haven't a clue how to straighten the rotor if that's the problem. I'm nothing if I'm not "mechanically challenged".
    I agree with Eric: it sounds as though the rotor is out of true. Spin the front wheel and watch the rotor as it moves through the caliper. If it's out of true, you'll see that the rotor moves way over to the edge of the slot. Since it's making noise, it's touching either the pads, or worse yet, the caliper itself.

    If you own an adjustable wrench (Crescent wrench), you can probably effect a repair yourself. Take your adjustable wrench and make sure the inside surface of the wrench is clean. (Just wipe it off with a clean rag or paper towel.) Then adjust the wrench so that it'll just fit over the rotor. You should end up with a slit in the wrench that's the thickness of the rotor.

    Now identify the section of rotor that moves over to the edge of the caliper the most. (I.e. the part that's most out-of-true.) Rotate the wheel 90 degrees and slip the adjustable wrench over the not-true section and gently bend the rotor away from where it's touching the caliper. Don't do too much at once! Just make small little adjustements to the rotor and check it after each adjustement. Take your time at it and get it reasonably straight. When you're done, you should be able to spin the wheel without it touching the sides at all. (If the rotor isn't centered, in the caliper it could constantly rub. But that's a different problem...)

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