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  1. #1
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    Bike Selection Help

    I just bought a Specialized Rockhopper and already want to upgrade to full suspension. Iíll be riding on streets, dirt trails with undulation, gravel, and maybe every other week a beginner trail in the desert.
    I have an XL in the Rockhopper right now ( Iím 6í5, 255 lbs) and Iím not sure if the reach is off or the seat height but I do get a lot of fatigue in my hands pretty quick. Usually about 15-20 minutes into the ride.
    Right now Iím looking at the following:

    https://www.canyon.com/en-us/mtb/spe...pectral-al-6-0

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...=236397-157617

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/me...=239758-159205


    https://us.yt-industries.com/detail/.../sCategory/511

    I donít know too much about components so Iím hoping you guys could give me a little information about what would be better on each of these or if thereís a clear favorite.

    Right now Iím leaning toward the two Stumpjumperís because Iíd like to stay local, my local shop offers free tune ups for life, but Iíd need a good discount on them. Is there a big difference between the two that makes one worth the extra $300?

    I like the Canyon after that but itís not a 29er which Iíd prefer.

    Appreciate the help!

  2. #2
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    honestly, if you have FIT issues, you need to dump preconceptions about the bike you want, and you need to just ride bikes and figure out what fits, regardless of brand.

    But I doubt that you have major fit issues. Maybe a minor setup issue, but based on what you've provided, it's impossible to say what that might be. Maybe a higher rise handlebar. Maybe adjusting saddle height or fore/aft position or angle. Maybe a handlebar with different sweep. Again, impossible to say what at this point. What is almost certain, though, is that you just need to keep riding the bike you've got because you're going to have to build up muscles and calluses. Because it takes time. Particularly, you need to build core strength to be able to support your body. Riding a mtb should involve putting most weight into the pedals and using your core to keep too much pressure off of your hands.

    For the riding you're actually doing, the bike you have actually sounds like a respectable choice. I certainly wouldn't bother spending thousands on a mid-travel full suspension if you're only riding the occasional beginner trail. For that matter, when you're spending over $3k on a bike, $300 is like waffling over $50 difference on a couple of $500 bikes. It's piddly when you look at the big picture. The biggest difference between those two bikes is the difference in travel. 130mm for the ST Comp and 150mm for the Comp. That'll change how they ride and how they handle. But either is frankly too much if you're mostly riding pavement with the very occasional beginner trail.

    I'd say hold onto your money until you're ready to commit specifically to mtb riding and you're ready to start using a full suspension for what it's best at - rough trails. You can keep the hardtail for pavement and gravel duties and save the FS for the stuff it's best at.

    Further, take your time. Make sure that your issues aren't just your body needing to adapt to riding a bike. Because you'll feel the same thing, if not worse, on any of those FS bikes you linked if so. And if your issues are a legitimate setup issue or fit issue, then approach it systematically, which may mean spending time at the shop talking to staff about your issues, and letting them watch you ride to identify things that might help. It may mean specifically seeking someone who knows something about fitting mountain bikes. But throwing thousands of dollars at the problem by trying to pick a bike online based on price is a recipe for disaster.

    Before you drop that kind of money, you need to know it's going to work for you. And at this point, you don't have a clue...just that you're not comfortable.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    honestly, if you have FIT issues, you need to dump preconceptions about the bike you want, and you need to just ride bikes and figure out what fits, regardless of brand.

    But I doubt that you have major fit issues. Maybe a minor setup issue, but based on what you've provided, it's impossible to say what that might be. Maybe a higher rise handlebar. Maybe adjusting saddle height or fore/aft position or angle. Maybe a handlebar with different sweep. Again, impossible to say what at this point. What is almost certain, though, is that you just need to keep riding the bike you've got because you're going to have to build up muscles and calluses. Because it takes time. Particularly, you need to build core strength to be able to support your body. Riding a mtb should involve putting most weight into the pedals and using your core to keep too much pressure off of your hands.

    For the riding you're actually doing, the bike you have actually sounds like a respectable choice. I certainly wouldn't bother spending thousands on a mid-travel full suspension if you're only riding the occasional beginner trail. For that matter, when you're spending over $3k on a bike, $300 is like waffling over $50 difference on a couple of $500 bikes. It's piddly when you look at the big picture. The biggest difference between those two bikes is the difference in travel. 130mm for the ST Comp and 150mm for the Comp. That'll change how they ride and how they handle. But either is frankly too much if you're mostly riding pavement with the very occasional beginner trail.

    I'd say hold onto your money until you're ready to commit specifically to mtb riding and you're ready to start using a full suspension for what it's best at - rough trails. You can keep the hardtail for pavement and gravel duties and save the FS for the stuff it's best at.

    Further, take your time. Make sure that your issues aren't just your body needing to adapt to riding a bike. Because you'll feel the same thing, if not worse, on any of those FS bikes you linked if so. And if your issues are a legitimate setup issue or fit issue, then approach it systematically, which may mean spending time at the shop talking to staff about your issues, and letting them watch you ride to identify things that might help. It may mean specifically seeking someone who knows something about fitting mountain bikes. But throwing thousands of dollars at the problem by trying to pick a bike online based on price is a recipe for disaster.

    Before you drop that kind of money, you need to know it's going to work for you. And at this point, you don't have a clue...just that you're not comfortable.
    I appreciate your advice and will follow it. I bought the bike about 3 weeks ago and have been riding it almost every day. I figured out the saddle issue and bought an ergon which made a big difference. The biggest thing is that thereís a lot of pressure in my hands and it feels like the bar is digging into my palms.

    How do you recommend riding other bikes though? Rent them? Itís usually hard to find things in my size.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    I appreciate your advice and will follow it. I bought the bike about 3 weeks ago and have been riding it almost every day. I figured out the saddle issue and bought an ergon which made a big difference. The biggest thing is that thereís a lot of pressure in my hands and it feels like the bar is digging into my palms.

    How do you recommend riding other bikes though? Rent them? Itís usually hard to find things in my size.
    It's demo season. Bike demo trucks are traveling the country right now. Usually you find them here and there one at a time, but occasionally you'll find events where multiple demo trucks show up to the same event. For example, recently there was one in my area where YT, Specialized, Trek, Transition, and a few others were on site. The demo rides got rained out, unfortunately, so it just ended up being a big party (which wasn't so bad) with onsite pavement test rides. You can find out about the events from the brands' social media feeds or their websites (events sections).

    Your hand issue is probably just a setup thing. Do you wear gloves? Do the grips offer much "cush" or are they thin/firm? Lots of options for cushier grips, and also a variety of ergonomic shapes.

    But part of this may be related to larger fit/setup issues. If you've got long legs and a short torso, you're going to have a big saddle-bars drop. That'll put a lot of weight on your hands. A bike with a very tall "stack" dimension can help bring your hands up without as much need for mega-rise handlebars. You can make your current bike work better by using bars with more rise if this is a reason for the hand pressure, as it should help you balance your weight better.

    But all that is hypothetical because I can't see your bike/setup, and you haven't posted pics.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    It's demo season. Bike demo trucks are traveling the country right now. Usually you find them here and there one at a time, but occasionally you'll find events where multiple demo trucks show up to the same event. For example, recently there was one in my area where YT, Specialized, Trek, Transition, and a few others were on site. The demo rides got rained out, unfortunately, so it just ended up being a big party (which wasn't so bad) with onsite pavement test rides. You can find out about the events from the brands' social media feeds or their websites (events sections).

    Your hand issue is probably just a setup thing. Do you wear gloves? Do the grips offer much "cush" or are they thin/firm? Lots of options for cushier grips, and also a variety of ergonomic shapes.

    But part of this may be related to larger fit/setup issues. If you've got long legs and a short torso, you're going to have a big saddle-bars drop. That'll put a lot of weight on your hands. A bike with a very tall "stack" dimension can help bring your hands up without as much need for mega-rise handlebars. You can make your current bike work better by using bars with more rise if this is a reason for the hand pressure, as it should help you balance your weight better.

    But all that is hypothetical because I can't see your bike/setup, and you haven't posted pics.
    I did buy bike gloves that have some gel in them to deal with it. I rode a bmx bike A LOT as a kid (haro shredder &#128526 and never a mtb. This is my first time riding them so thereís definitely a lot to learn. Iíve never really had issues with pain in my hands. Granted we are talking 20 years ago when I was 1,000x more active so that could be it too.

    My grips were upgraded to the Ergon GE1 Evo. The stock grips were too aggressive and were tearing up my hands.

    What pictures would be best to post and what determines if you have a short torso? I measured my inseam and itís 36Ē.

    Finally, I suspect itís more than just a grip issues and a bit more of an overall bike fit issue.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    honestly, if you have FIT issues, you need to dump preconceptions about the bike you want, and you need to just ride bikes and figure out what fits, regardless of brand.

    But I doubt that you have major fit issues. Maybe a minor setup issue, but based on what you've provided, it's impossible to say what that might be. Maybe a higher rise handlebar. Maybe adjusting saddle height or fore/aft position or angle. Maybe a handlebar with different sweep. Again, impossible to say what at this point. What is almost certain, though, is that you just need to keep riding the bike you've got because you're going to have to build up muscles and calluses. Because it takes time. Particularly, you need to build core strength to be able to support your body. Riding a mtb should involve putting most weight into the pedals and using your core to keep too much pressure off of your hands.

    For the riding you're actually doing, the bike you have actually sounds like a respectable choice. I certainly wouldn't bother spending thousands on a mid-travel full suspension if you're only riding the occasional beginner trail. For that matter, when you're spending over $3k on a bike, $300 is like waffling over $50 difference on a couple of $500 bikes. It's piddly when you look at the big picture. The biggest difference between those two bikes is the difference in travel. 130mm for the ST Comp and 150mm for the Comp. That'll change how they ride and how they handle. But either is frankly too much if you're mostly riding pavement with the very occasional beginner trail.

    I'd say hold onto your money until you're ready to commit specifically to mtb riding and you're ready to start using a full suspension for what it's best at - rough trails. You can keep the hardtail for pavement and gravel duties and save the FS for the stuff it's best at.

    Further, take your time. Make sure that your issues aren't just your body needing to adapt to riding a bike. Because you'll feel the same thing, if not worse, on any of those FS bikes you linked if so. And if your issues are a legitimate setup issue or fit issue, then approach it systematically, which may mean spending time at the shop talking to staff about your issues, and letting them watch you ride to identify things that might help. It may mean specifically seeking someone who knows something about fitting mountain bikes. But throwing thousands of dollars at the problem by trying to pick a bike online based on price is a recipe for disaster.

    Before you drop that kind of money, you need to know it's going to work for you. And at this point, you don't have a clue...just that you're not comfortable.
    This doesnt help much. IMO.

  7. #7
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    Hey im 6í6Ē with a 37Ē inseam 260lbs. So i feel qualified to answer you.

    I started with a xxl specialized fuse. This bike has lots of stack. I switched further to full length steerer tube in my fork and then mounted 38mm riser bars. So now its really got alot of stack. I end up with my seat about parallel to the bars or a touch higher. This was my first mountain bike. I learned alot on it.


    Now i went and got an xxl stumpjumper. They were sold in 2018 in aluminum only. I did the same thing w the stack again. But when i first tried it, it had stock bars with a yari fork. This turned my hands numb after about 15minutes. So i put the same bars on as my fuse and it made a huge difference. Deity cz38. Way way better. Then upgraded the internal dampers inside my fork to charger rc2. Now my hands are perfect. Point is bars can be too stiff or wrong curve.

    Imo a 2019 stumpjumper xl frame is way too small. I sat on one and it wasnt even close for me. Check the measurements of the xxl stumpy to compare. Also spec and im sure other frame manufacturers change specs from time to time. My stumpy has 40mm less top tube than quoted. As i found out when i got it. So do go sit on and look at the bike. Even take a couple pictures on the bike to see how your posture looks. the 29er frames have higher stack heights to fit the larger wheels (diff frames). So stay with 29ers.

    If your not sure about bike fit just know that you are learning and should start with a bike that puts your handelbars about parallel w the seat.

    So 650mm stack and higher. Reach should be a min of 480. Stems and seat adjust can help w the rest. Head tube angles should be 67 to 68.5 degrees. Its very hard to find a bike out there like this.

    See spec. Fuse, Trek fuel. Kona wozo

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/st...=240024-133918

    https://www.konaworld.com/wozo.cfm

    https://www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/b...-8-29/p/23593/

    any bike shop that doesnt follow this guidelines above should be avoided.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    Hey im 6í6Ē with a 37Ē inseam 260lbs. So i feel qualified to answer you.

    I started with a xxl specialized fuse. This bike has lots of stack. I switched further to full length steerer tube in my fork and then mounted 38mm riser bars. So now its really got alot of stack. I end up with my seat about parallel to the bars or a touch higher. This was my first mountain bike. I learned alot on it.


    Now i went and got an xxl stumpjumper. They were sold in 2018 in aluminum only. I did the same thing w the stack again. But when i first tried it, it had stock bars with a yari fork. This turned my hands numb after about 15minutes. So i put the same bars on as my fuse and it made a huge difference. Deity cz38. Way way better. Then upgraded the internal dampers inside my fork to charger rc2. Now my hands are perfect. Point is bars can be too stiff or wrong curve.

    Imo a 2019 stumpjumper xl frame is way too small. I sat on one and it wasnt even close for me. Check the measurements of the xxl stumpy to compare. Also spec and im sure other frame manufacturers change specs from time to time. My stumpy has 40mm less top tube than quoted. As i found out when i got it. So do go sit on and look at the bike. Even take a couple pictures on the bike to see how your posture looks. the 29er frames have higher stack heights to fit the larger wheels (diff frames). So stay with 29ers.

    If your not sure about bike fit just know that you are learning and should start with a bike that puts your handelbars about parallel w the seat.

    So 650mm stack and higher. Reach should be a min of 480. Stems and seat adjust can help w the rest. Head tube angles should be 67 to 68.5 degrees. Its very hard to find a bike out there like this.

    See spec. Fuse, Trek fuel. Kona wozo

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/st...=240024-133918

    https://www.konaworld.com/wozo.cfm

    https://www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/b...-8-29/p/23593/

    any bike shop that doesnt follow this guidelines above should be avoided.
    Did you ever use any kind of tool to figure out what specs you should look for on a bike based on your own specific measurements? Iíve used some on direct to consumer websites and they put me on XL bikes because of my inseam.

  9. #9
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    Pressure on palms:
    1. Core strength. Do planks every day. 99% of the aches and pains we get while riding a bike can be mitigated by making our bodies stronger. From personal experience, no amount of throwing money at parts and fitting services can substitute for physical strength in this regard. You have to be able to stabilize your body without straining one part.
    2. Bigger grips. Maybe even something like Ergon's shapely grips. You're nearly 6-1/2 feet tall, so I'll assume you have big hands. A few companies make really fat grips in standard round shape.
    3. Raise your grips or shorten your reach, or both. Taller riser bars, a stem with a more upward angle, and/or a shorter stem will do this.
    Last edited by mack_turtle; 05-29-2019 at 10:20 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    This doesnt help much. IMO.
    Lol. I see you've done well in providing information

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    I did buy bike gloves that have some gel in them to deal with it. I rode a bmx bike A LOT as a kid (haro shredder ) and never a mtb. This is my first time riding them so thereís definitely a lot to learn. Iíve never really had issues with pain in my hands. Granted we are talking 20 years ago when I was 1,000x more active so that could be it too.

    My grips were upgraded to the Ergon GE1 Evo. The stock grips were too aggressive and were tearing up my hands.

    What pictures would be best to post and what determines if you have a short torso? I measured my inseam and itís 36Ē.

    Finally, I suspect itís more than just a grip issues and a bit more of an overall bike fit issue.
    Yeah, a mtb is by definition going to fit differently than a bmx bike. So certainly building your core strength and bike fitness will be a factor. As will just adapting to the bike.

    As for pictures, side pics of the bike (just the bike) can be informative. Especially with a side pic of you ON the bike for comparison. Unfortunately no pics will substitute for actually watching you ride it. A vid showing what needs to be seen is going to be harder to record than you think.

    As for the long/short torso thing, I got to where I could look at someone (in non bulky clothing) and get an idea of that. A pic of yourself standing against a wall might do it. With a 36 inseam at your height, you prob do have a short torso. A side pic of your bike setup will prob be enough to confirm, assuming seat height is vaguely at a good height for pedaling.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Pressure on palms:
    1. Core strength. Do planks every day. 99% of the aches and pains we get while riding a bike can be mitigated by making our bodies stronger. From personal experience, no amount of throwing money at parts and fitting services can substitute for physical strength in this regard is. You have to be able to stabilize your body without strairing one part.
    2. Bigger grips. Maybe even something like Ergon's shapely grips. You're nearly 6-1/2 feet tall, so I'll assume you have big hands. A few companies make really fat grips in standard round shape.
    3. Raise your grips or shorten your reach, or both. Taller riser bars, a stem with a more upward angle, and/or a shorter stem will do this.
    Core strength is most likely the biggest culprit so Iíll be doing those planks. I canít even ride with no hands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    Did you ever use any kind of tool to figure out what specs you should look for on a bike based on your own specific measurements? Iíve used some on direct to consumer websites and they put me on XL bikes because of my inseam.
    I find that those calculators werent much help for me. Im just on the fringe end. Eg over 250lbs.

    What model rockhopper? I see they make an xxl. Also that the xl has a 90mm stem and 69.8 degree head angle. You might find the xxl bike w a 45 to 60mm stem feels better. Did they have an xxl for you to try at the time?

    If they have, try a fuse. Its also available in xxl.

    I took my time as i knew very little about the sport and technology involved. It paid off as i ended up on a bike that suited my needs very well. A bit lucky as well.

    Like yourself i also started just riding around on bike paths w the kids. But as my confidence grew that quickly escalated to longer rides and on more challenging terrain.

    You need to be comfortable on the bike so maybe check out a couple other bikes, verify your bike fit, and possibly try a diff handlebar.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Yeah, a mtb is by definition going to fit differently than a bmx bike. So certainly building your core strength and bike fitness will be a factor. As will just adapting to the bike.

    As for pictures, side pics of the bike (just the bike) can be informative. Especially with a side pic of you ON the bike for comparison. Unfortunately no pics will substitute for actually watching you ride it. A vid showing what needs to be seen is going to be harder to record than you think.

    As for the long/short torso thing, I got to where I could look at someone (in non bulky clothing) and get an idea of that. A pic of yourself standing against a wall might do it. With a 36 inseam at your height, you prob do have a short torso. A side pic of your bike setup will prob be enough to confirm, assuming seat height is vaguely at a good height for pedaling.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    Here you go:


    the seat post was moved down about an inch after taking these photos.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bike Selection Help-d468583b-a3e3-47fe-8acc-71d4dc59badf.jpg  

    Bike Selection Help-64efd09f-a338-49df-b675-151a98e08660.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    I find that those calculators werent much help for me. Im just on the fringe end. Eg over 250lbs.

    What model rockhopper? I see they make an xxl. Also that the xl has a 90mm stem and 69.8 degree head angle. You might find the xxl bike w a 45 to 60mm stem feels better. Did they have an xxl for you to try at the time?

    If they have, try a fuse. Its also available in xxl.

    I took my time as i knew very little about the sport and technology involved. It paid off as i ended up on a bike that suited my needs very well. A bit lucky as well.

    Like yourself i also started just riding around on bike paths w the kids. But as my confidence grew that quickly escalated to longer rides and on more challenging terrain.

    You need to be comfortable on the bike so maybe check out a couple other bikes, verify your bike fit, and possibly try a diff handlebar.
    I havenít had the chance to ride any XXL bike yet. Iíll see if I can swing by my local bike shop to see if theyíll let me test ride one just for science.

  16. #16
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    You moved the seat DOWN after these pics? See, I think it could go up. Your left knee is probably bent more than it should be in the riding pic.

    Also, I think the bars could be rotated towards you. That amount of upsweep would hurt my hands for sure.

    You look a little slouchy in the ride pic, too. Not sure how things will look when the seat height is higher and the bars rotated. Try those things, then take more pics.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    You moved the seat DOWN after these pics? See, I think it could go up. Your left knee is probably bent more than it should be in the riding pic.

    Also, I think the bars could be rotated towards you. That amount of upsweep would hurt my hands for sure.

    You look a little slouchy in the ride pic, too. Not sure how things will look when the seat height is higher and the bars rotated. Try those things, then take more pics.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    Alright Iíll try those two things tomorrow. I could also be slouchy because Iím flabby and out of shape these days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    Alright Iíll try those two things tomorrow. I could also be slouchy because Iím flabby and out of shape these days.
    Thanks for posting the pictures.

    Hardtails on the street use a slightly higher seat position vs on the trail. Reason... you brace a little bit to raise your butt off the seat just slightly for certain obstacles during pedaling. So that needs a little bit lower seat.

    To set seat height, sit and have someone hold the bike. Slowly rotate the pedals backwards with your heels on the pedals. You should be able to fully extend the knee. Then on the trail you might drop half an inch.

    in the image. Your opposite knee doesnt look close to fully extended. You may not have enough seat tube to get the height you need. Another indication the bike is too small.

    For playing around with the kids, this bike will do.... but its too short and your hands are too close to your knees. Raising the seat a little will help, but you will notice when you try a larger bike.

    bars... definitely look rolled up and at a weird angle. Put both feet on the ground. Loosen them, Approximate your pedalling position for your arms and upper body and rotate them till they feel most comfortable, then lock them down. Riser bars with a bend that fits you best will help. Look up the diety cz38 model i spoke of. But try holding some in the store to feel how different they feel from one to another.

    Dont forget to have fun.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    Hardtails on the street use a slightly higher seat position vs on the trail. Reason... you brace a little bit to raise your butt off the seat just slightly for certain obstacles during pedaling. So that needs a little bit lower seat.

    To set seat height, sit and have someone hold the bike. Slowly rotate the pedals backwards with your heels on the pedals. You should be able to fully extend the knee. Then on the trail you might drop half an inch.

    in the image. Your opposite knee doesnt look close to fully extended. You may not have enough seat tube to get the height you need. Another indication the bike is too small.
    Eh, seat position for "road" riding vs "trail" riding isn't going to be enormously different. It's really a pretty subtle difference. You don't have much wiggle room because too far and your knees will start to hurt. The way you phrase it makes it sound like a big difference. It isn't.

    As for determining the seat height - that might be a start, but shoe thickness will affect things. Do this with the shoes you're going to ride in. If the pedals on that bike are the stock plastic platforms, OP should get some more durable ones ASAP before messing too much (because pedal thickness will affect saddle height, too). Setting the saddle height is largely about getting decent leg extension and knee comfort while pedaling.

    It's not a reliable gauge of whether a bike fits or not. I've noticed over the years that a LOT of tall guys have odd body proportions (especially the short torso/long leg combination) and ride a frame size shorter than you might expect for their height. I worked in a shop with two tall guys who were exactly like this. Because of their long legs, they had to have their saddles high. But because of their short torsos, they had to ride a smaller frame size to keep reach reasonable.

    I hesitate to say OP's bike is too small because in raising the saddle, it will stretch him out because the saddle will also be moving backwards. And yeah, it's possible that OP might need a longer seatpost. I'd say before buying a any parts, though, it'd be worth trying a XXL frame. If I was selling OP a bike, I'd definitely want to see him on an XXL at his height. If anything, it would be informative to see which size he was closest to.

    If, in fact, OP is on the wrong frame size, we've got a legitimate reason to buy a new bike and I'd emphasize that what is most important is a bike that fits, not what looks good on a spec sheet.

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    I also wouldn't spend more money on this bike before getting into a quality bike shop and trying out a few different xxl frames. That might mean a few different bike stores as there are only a few bikes made in xxl size and each shop carries only a few brands and fewer yet may actually have one in stock.

    The bike you have is an entry level bike that sadly comes in xxl size which you could have tried. Its very common to adjust handlebar stem length to make a short bike a bit bigger and a long bike a bit smaller. Most manufacturers are specifying 50-60mm stem lengths. Then you can size down to 35mm or up to 75mm. Its uncommon to see 90mm stems factory on modern geometry bikes. IMO.

    To get on a bike that comes with a stem that long and already be too big for the frame is legitimate reason to size up to an xxl.

    Unfortunately alot of stores dont want to carry these bikes as they can be harder to sell. So they often end up discounted at the end of the year. IMO, for cash flow reasons, they would rather just not bother to stock them. This leaves sales people with a desire to sell what they have. Size availability is just one of the negatives us tall people face.

    To the OP. Biking is alot of fun and a great and rewarding activity to do with the family or with a friend. Way to go for having the courage to post on here and share your experience and look for help and answers.

    Im an inch taller and have an inch more inseam, so i can pretty much assume we have similar torso's. You may likely have a little more arm reach than I which is good as it will let you accommodate a bike with a lower stack height a bit better.

    Once you find a bike frame that fits, plan on changing a couple things. Most shops will give you a deal on accessories. Mine gave 10% of the bike cost towards accessories credit at purchase. So on went taller bars with a bend that fit my hands in a more relaxed position. The bars also had a little more flex (didnt feel like a steel beam stiff) so that made riding more comfortable. I also upgraded pedals to ones with steel pins to grip my shoes and that offered the size support for my 14 shoe.

    Attached is a pic of my hardtail xxl Fuse. I frequently have people comment "wow is that a big bike".



    Stick with it and you may find a new passion that provides more health and wellness benefits than you originally thought possible.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bike Selection Help-20170820_173400.jpg  

    Bike Selection Help-5a2ba09a-6ef2-48b4-a6a0-f0cdffffa83c.jpeg  


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Eh, seat position for "road" riding vs "trail" riding isn't going to be enormously different. It's really a pretty subtle difference. You don't have much wiggle room because too far and your knees will start to hurt. The way you phrase it makes it sound like a big difference. It isn't.

    As for determining the seat height - that might be a start, but shoe thickness will affect things. Do this with the shoes you're going to ride in. If the pedals on that bike are the stock plastic platforms, OP should get some more durable ones ASAP before messing too much (because pedal thickness will affect saddle height, too). Setting the saddle height is largely about getting decent leg extension and knee comfort while pedaling.

    It's not a reliable gauge of whether a bike fits or not. I've noticed over the years that a LOT of tall guys have odd body proportions (especially the short torso/long leg combination) and ride a frame size shorter than you might expect for their height. I worked in a shop with two tall guys who were exactly like this. Because of their long legs, they had to have their saddles high. But because of their short torsos, they had to ride a smaller frame size to keep reach reasonable.

    I hesitate to say OP's bike is too small because in raising the saddle, it will stretch him out because the saddle will also be moving backwards. And yeah, it's possible that OP might need a longer seatpost. I'd say before buying a any parts, though, it'd be worth trying a XXL frame. If I was selling OP a bike, I'd definitely want to see him on an XXL at his height. If anything, it would be informative to see which size he was closest to.

    If, in fact, OP is on the wrong frame size, we've got a legitimate reason to buy a new bike and I'd emphasize that what is most important is a bike that fits, not what looks good on a spec sheet.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    I also wouldn't spend more money on this bike before getting into a quality bike shop and trying out a few different xxl frames. That might mean a few different bike stores as there are only a few bikes made in xxl size and each shop carries only a few brands and fewer yet may actually have one in stock.

    The bike you have is an entry level bike that sadly comes in xxl size which you could have tried. Its very common to adjust handlebar stem length to make a short bike a bit bigger and a long bike a bit smaller. Most manufacturers are specifying 50-60mm stem lengths. Then you can size down to 35mm or up to 75mm. Its uncommon to see 90mm stems factory on modern geometry bikes. IMO.

    To get on a bike that comes with a stem that long and already be too big for the frame is legitimate reason to size up to an xxl.

    Unfortunately alot of stores dont want to carry these bikes as they can be harder to sell. So they often end up discounted at the end of the year. IMO, for cash flow reasons, they would rather just not bother to stock them. This leaves sales people with a desire to sell what they have. Size availability is just one of the negatives us tall people face.

    To the OP. Biking is alot of fun and a great and rewarding activity to do with the family or with a friend. Way to go for having the courage to post on here and share your experience and look for help and answers.

    Im an inch taller and have an inch more inseam, so i can pretty much assume we have similar torso's. You may likely have a little more arm reach than I which is good as it will let you accommodate a bike with a lower stack height a bit better.

    Once you find a bike frame that fits, plan on changing a couple things. Most shops will give you a deal on accessories. Mine gave 10% of the bike cost towards accessories credit at purchase. So on went taller bars with a bend that fit my hands in a more relaxed position. The bars also had a little more flex (didnt feel like a steel beam stiff) so that made riding more comfortable. I also upgraded pedals to ones with steel pins to grip my shoes and that offered the size support for my 14 shoe.

    Attached is a pic of my hardtail xxl Fuse. I frequently have people comment "wow is that a big bike".



    Stick with it and you may find a new passion that provides more health and wellness benefits than you originally thought possible.
    Hereís a new photo. This is with the seat post up and handle bars adjusted.

    Bike Selection Help-50b1983a-1d82-4766-9f9c-9159871804f9.jpg

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    I also wouldn't spend more money on this bike before getting into a quality bike shop and trying out a few different xxl frames. That might mean a few different bike stores as there are only a few bikes made in xxl size and each shop carries only a few brands and fewer yet may actually have one in stock.

    The bike you have is an entry level bike that sadly comes in xxl size which you could have tried. Its very common to adjust handlebar stem length to make a short bike a bit bigger and a long bike a bit smaller. Most manufacturers are specifying 50-60mm stem lengths. Then you can size down to 35mm or up to 75mm. Its uncommon to see 90mm stems factory on modern geometry bikes. IMO.

    To get on a bike that comes with a stem that long and already be too big for the frame is legitimate reason to size up to an xxl.

    Unfortunately alot of stores dont want to carry these bikes as they can be harder to sell. So they often end up discounted at the end of the year. IMO, for cash flow reasons, they would rather just not bother to stock them. This leaves sales people with a desire to sell what they have. Size availability is just one of the negatives us tall people face.

    To the OP. Biking is alot of fun and a great and rewarding activity to do with the family or with a friend. Way to go for having the courage to post on here and share your experience and look for help and answers.

    Im an inch taller and have an inch more inseam, so i can pretty much assume we have similar torso's. You may likely have a little more arm reach than I which is good as it will let you accommodate a bike with a lower stack height a bit better.

    Once you find a bike frame that fits, plan on changing a couple things. Most shops will give you a deal on accessories. Mine gave 10% of the bike cost towards accessories credit at purchase. So on went taller bars with a bend that fit my hands in a more relaxed position. The bars also had a little more flex (didnt feel like a steel beam stiff) so that made riding more comfortable. I also upgraded pedals to ones with steel pins to grip my shoes and that offered the size support for my 14 shoe.

    Attached is a pic of my hardtail xxl Fuse. I frequently have people comment "wow is that a big bike".



    Stick with it and you may find a new passion that provides more health and wellness benefits than you originally thought possible.
    Might be useful for OP to see another tall rider on a bike that fits. Could you share a pic similar to his?
    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    Hereís a new photo. This is with the seat post up and handle bars adjusted.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Yeah, it looks better. But it's more clear to me that your bike is small. Here is a pic of me on mine. I am 5'8 with longish arms, and the bike is a medium Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead. I think I need to shorten the stem just a touch, but it feels good otherwise. notice the space I have between my knees and my hands compared to your own pic. that space gives me more room to maneuver the bike.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Might be useful for OP to see another tall rider on a bike that fits. Could you share a pic similar to his?Yeah, it looks better. But it's more clear to me that your bike is small. Here is a pic of me on mine. I am 5'8 with longish arms, and the bike is a medium Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead. I think I need to shorten the stem just a touch, but it feels good otherwise. notice the space I have between my knees and my hands compared to your own pic. that space gives me more room to maneuver the bike.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    So how much bigger do you think it should be? What measurements should I look for on my bike to compare to a new bike? And finally, how much larger should those measurements be in comparison to my current ones?

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    So how much bigger do you think it should be? What measurements should I look for on my bike to compare to a new bike? And finally, how much larger should those measurements be in comparison to my current ones?
    It's not like you have a ton of choice, but I think you need to try a bike a size larger than what you have. Look at the manufacturer's geometry charts to see what that means.

    Also note that not every company's sizes will fit the same. For example, a large santa cruz fits me better than a medium, even though all the bikes I own are mediums. So you might find some companies' xl frames fit better than others.

    It's no different than clothes, really. There is minimal consistency between brands. I am noticing mens clothing getting worse in this regard lately.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    Core strength is most likely the biggest culprit so Iíll be doing those planks. I canít even ride with no hands.
    Some simple Chi-Gung deep knee bends will help the core strength. Weight lifter squats are also pretty good with light weight.

    By the look of you riding position on the bike, a set of Carver TI handlebars and Ergon Bio-cork grips would be the cheap bike fit fix.

    You can always keep the TI handlebars and grips for when you move to a different framed bike.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    It's not like you have a ton of choice, but I think you need to try a bike a size larger than what you have. Look at the manufacturer's geometry charts to see what that means.

    Also note that not every company's sizes will fit the same. For example, a large santa cruz fits me better than a medium, even though all the bikes I own are mediums. So you might find some companies' xl frames fit better than others.

    It's no different than clothes, really. There is minimal consistency between brands. I am noticing mens clothing getting worse in this regard lately.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    Thatís true. But I figured thatís why I should have some measurements that could be useful. Top tube measurement for one would help no?

    https://us.yt-industries.com/detail/.../sCategory/511

    it also looks like this is the bike geometry for the rockhopper. So knowing how that fits me, is there anything I should look for in particular on a new in comparison to the next?



    Im not sure how much testing Iíll get to do. I can def test out a specialized bike near me but not many bike shops carry anything other than them or trek near me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bike Selection Help-9995ba49-1078-4e38-b346-c52ac066d91a.jpg  


  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    Thatís true. But I figured thatís why I should have some measurements that could be useful. Top tube measurement for one would help no?
    For one, you have to look at bike geo as a complete package. When looking at top tube, you also need to consider reach. They are two ways of measuring the length of a bike that don't take into account everything. Stem length is also part of it.

    The only way to know for sure what you need is to find a bike that fits like a glove and use that as your model, or to go through a lengthy and expensive measurement and fitting process with someone who knows and specializes in fitting mountain bikes.

    Since riding a mountain bike is a dynamic thing with lots of variability in riding positions and riding styles, it is entirely possible for two people the same size to be fit onto bikes differently.

    Especially if you are going to move up from the entry level class of bikes and start spending thousands, you should do the work to figure out what works.

    Most use the trial-and-error method. For mtb's, since fit is a little bit of a more flexible concept and because there are larger differences between sizes, this can work well. But you have to have access to try a variety of bikes. You don't need to worry much about nonstandard mtb fits since you aren't looking at dirt jump bikes or downhill bikes. First step is to find what gets you a comfortable seated position for lots of pedaling. Second step is to make sure you have enough room or range of motion to maneuver the bike in technical situations and when standing.

    For road bikes, the complex measurement method works better since road bike fit needs to be more precise for the seated position you'll be in most of the time.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    honestly, if you have FIT issues, you need to dump preconceptions about the bike you want, and you need to just ride bikes and figure out what fits, regardless of brand.

    But I doubt that you have major fit issues. Maybe a minor setup issue, but based on what you've provided, it's impossible to say what that might be. Maybe a higher rise handlebar. Maybe adjusting saddle height or fore/aft position or angle. Maybe a handlebar with different sweep. Again, impossible to say what at this point. What is almost certain, though, is that you just need to keep riding the bike you've got because you're going to have to build up muscles and calluses. Because it takes time. Particularly, you need to build core strength to be able to support your body. Riding a mtb should involve putting most weight into the pedals and using your core to keep too much pressure off of your hands.

    For the riding you're actually doing, the bike you have actually sounds like a respectable choice. I certainly wouldn't bother spending thousands on a mid-travel full suspension if you're only riding the occasional beginner trail. For that matter, when you're spending over $3k on a bike, $300 is like waffling over $50 difference on a couple of $500 bikes. It's piddly when you look at the big picture. The biggest difference between those two bikes is the difference in travel. 130mm for the ST Comp and 150mm for the Comp. That'll change how they ride and how they handle. But either is frankly too much if you're mostly riding pavement with the very occasional beginner trail.

    I'd say hold onto your money until you're ready to commit specifically to mtb riding and you're ready to start using a full suspension for what it's best at - rough trails. You can keep the hardtail for pavement and gravel duties and save the FS for the stuff it's best at.

    Further, take your time. Make sure that your issues aren't just your body needing to adapt to riding a bike. Because you'll feel the same thing, if not worse, on any of those FS bikes you linked if so. And if your issues are a legitimate setup issue or fit issue, then approach it systematically, which may mean spending time at the shop talking to staff about your issues, and letting them watch you ride to identify things that might help. It may mean specifically seeking someone who knows something about fitting mountain bikes. But throwing thousands of dollars at the problem by trying to pick a bike online based on price is a recipe for disaster.

    Before you drop that kind of money, you need to know it's going to work for you. And at this point, you don't have a clue...just that you're not comfortable.
    I couldn't have said it better. I'd find out why your current bike makes you uncomfortable before buying a new bike.

    Is it bike related:
    - saddle height?
    - saddle fore-aft?
    - bar height, roll, sweep?
    - is the bike to small?
    - does the geometry just not suit you?
    I'd find a good bike fitter and enlist his or her help

    Is it due to you needing to develop different muscles:
    - core strength?
    - hand strength?
    - upper body strength?
    A good physiotherapist (are they called physical therapists in the US?) can easily advise you on how well your body is working.

    It's awesome that you're riding everyday, which further indicates to me that it's worthwhile finding the root-causes of your hand discomfort before you spend money on a bike that may not solve your issue.

    As a side thought, have you considered a hardtail with 2.6 or 2.8 tyres? It sounds like it may suit you better than a FS bike for riding you describe.


    Here's a thread that might be useful.
    https://forums.mtbr.com/29er-bikes/r...b-1102594.html

    If you want to search MTBR, here's how you can do it with google
    site:forums.mtbr.com TYPE YOUR SEARCH TERMS HERE
    e.g site:forums.mtbr.com hand pain


    edit: re bar sweep: this might be interesting
    https://nsmb.com/articles/defying-co...BA-sweep-bars/

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    For one, you have to look at bike geo as a complete package. When looking at top tube, you also need to consider reach. They are two ways of measuring the length of a bike that don't take into account everything. Stem length is also part of it.

    The only way to know for sure what you need is to find a bike that fits like a glove and use that as your model, or to go through a lengthy and expensive measurement and fitting process with someone who knows and specializes in fitting mountain bikes.

    Since riding a mountain bike is a dynamic thing with lots of variability in riding positions and riding styles, it is entirely possible for two people the same size to be fit onto bikes differently.

    Especially if you are going to move up from the entry level class of bikes and start spending thousands, you should do the work to figure out what works.

    Most use the trial-and-error method. For mtb's, since fit is a little bit of a more flexible concept and because there are larger differences between sizes, this can work well. But you have to have access to try a variety of bikes. You don't need to worry much about nonstandard mtb fits since you aren't looking at dirt jump bikes or downhill bikes. First step is to find what gets you a comfortable seated position for lots of pedaling. Second step is to make sure you have enough room or range of motion to maneuver the bike in technical situations and when standing.

    For road bikes, the complex measurement method works better since road bike fit needs to be more precise for the seated position you'll be in most of the time.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    I see. Question for you. With the seat post up higher I find the saddle digs in the bottom of my butt, pretty much where my inner thighs meets my butt. It puts me at a weird angle and the meat of my butt isnít on the saddle unless I keep adjusting it so that it is. Thatís not natural though. Any idea what could be causing this? Lack of core strength to keep me in a better position? More negatives due to frame size? Should I angle the saddle down a tiny bit?

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    I see. Question for you. With the seat post up higher I find the saddle digs in the bottom of my butt, pretty much where my inner thighs meets my butt. It puts me at a weird angle and the meat of my butt isnít on the saddle unless I keep adjusting it so that it is. Thatís not natural though. Any idea what could be causing this? Core strength to keep my in a better position? More negatives due to fram size? Should I angle the saddle down a tiny bit?
    Could be all of the above. But one thing you should be aware of is that "the meat" of your butt should not be where the saddle pressure goes. That is a great recipe for saddle sores, hot spots, numbness, and reduction of circulation.

    The "sit bones" of your pelvis should be supporting you on the saddle primarily. Generally, those points are fairly narrow on people relative to their overall hip width. Saddle position adjustments might be necessary to achieve that. A different saddle might be necessary to achieve that. And absolutely riding a bike that's the wrong size will affect it. The angle your pelvis contacts the saddle will change depending on the frame size.

    The geometry of the frame will affect it, too. When I bought the bike you see in the pic, I had to set it up a little differently than my other mtb. The seat tube angle may affect the angle of the saddle that is comfortable. I had to drop the nose a touch to be comfortable with a steeper seat tube angle.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Could be all of the above. But one thing you should be aware of is that "the meat" of your butt should not be where the saddle pressure goes. That is a great recipe for saddle sores, hot spots, numbness, and reduction of circulation.

    The "sit bones" of your pelvis should be supporting you on the saddle primarily. Generally, those points are fairly narrow on people relative to their overall hip width. Saddle position adjustments might be necessary to achieve that. A different saddle might be necessary to achieve that. And absolutely riding a bike that's the wrong size will affect it. The angle your pelvis contacts the saddle will change depending on the frame size.

    The geometry of the frame will affect it, too. When I bought the bike you see in the pic, I had to set it up a little differently than my other mtb. The seat tube angle may affect the angle of the saddle that is comfortable. I had to drop the nose a touch to be comfortable with a steeper seat tube angle.

    Sent from my VS995 using Tapatalk
    Interesting. I guess I have some playing around to do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by itsMinimalist View Post
    Interesting. I guess I have some playing around to do.

    Harold. The following is not meant to be harsh.

    Please send through a side pic preferably sitting and standing. Your three quarter view is hard to compare. Further, the gg bike is at the extreme end of modern frame designs. Its not a beginner bike that will see occasional trail use. Its narrowly focused for mountain riding. Steep downs and steep climbs. Its going to have a super long reach super steep seat tube and be slack in head angle.

    Gg website puts you on a size 1 frame. If we assume 4=xl then 3=L 2=m. Im going to say you are riding a frame thats ine size bigger than recommended for you.

    now being 5í8Ē is important here. The gg bike has a reach 11mm shorter than the bike a guy 6í5Ē is riding. So if he is 13% larger, then your bikes 451mm would be about 510mm for the taller rider. Yet he is on a frame only 11mm longer not 59mm longer.

    Instead you would like to run a shorter stem as the bars are too far forward and the other guy is on a 90mm stem and needs to lengthen it way more. Your steering feel sharpers and improves and his feels like the steering wheel on an old tractor with no power steering.

    Your 65.5 degree head angle is built to be stable at mach 1 speed coming down a mountain. It dont get much more slack than that. The rockhopper is so steep by comparison, that trying to ride down a driveway while standing feels like any minute the bars will spit you over the front.

    lets look at the kona woozo. A bike that suprised me with its geometry and features.

    we have 510 reach, 666 stack, 697 top tube length and 68.5Ē head tube angle. It comes w 3.8Ē wide tires but can run down to a 3.25Ē for better trail performance or up for true fat bike fun. A host of other features that make it super flexible for different customization. The head angle could be a little slacker but a slight fork length change would help there.

    this bike would feel like driving a fullsize pickup truck vs a honda civic that he has now.

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    A simple solution is to just have your bike shop exchange the bike to an xxl frame. This gains you a half inch. 12mm reach. This will fit better and you have a bike you can ride a little more comfortably. But in truth you need way more than that. So id push them to get you an xxl fuse.

    Ill try to post a couple pics tomorrow of my bike fit.

    trying a trek fuel ex, specialized fuse or the kona wozo would be beneficial. Santa cruz is crazy expensive but they do make bigger frames.

    Remember that even for me i had to increase my stack using brand new aftermarket forks that come with the tube uncut so i could add spacers under my bars (make them higher) then try to push the bars further forward using longer 70mm stems. I still wish my bikes had another inch of reach.

    The top tube jump from rockhopper xl to fuse xxl is 648 to 679mm or 31mm. slide the seat back for another 10mm. That will give the knees a bit more room. Raising the bars up w a higher riser. 40mm max riser. Makes more space for the knees.

    let us know what you bike shop can do for you. If they are a good shop they should exchange the bike. Especially if your going to a more expensive bike.

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    My two cents... Your saddle looked decent to begin with and I would think raising it would only increase hand pain due to additional pressure from the need to lean down more to reach the bars. I also think adjusting the nose down on the saddle is the wrong move as it can cause the body to slide forward forcing more hand pressure to resist the sliding.*


    You should probably be on an XXL. But, for your riding, I would consider trying a longer stem and setback seatpost first (at least slide the seat back as far as possible now). You can find a used 120mm stem for next to nothing. This won't be good for tight singletrack but sounds like you aren't riding that yet. Also try different grips and adjusting the angle of the bar. Grips and bar angle alone have solved hand/wrist pain for me in the past.



    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by tarheel03 View Post
    My two cents... Your saddle looked decent to begin with and I would think raising it would only increase hand pain due to additional pressure from the need to lean down more to reach the bars. I also think adjusting the nose down on the saddle is the wrong move as it can cause the body to slide forward forcing more hand pressure to resist the sliding.*


    You should probably be on an XXL. But, for your riding, I would consider trying a longer stem and setback seatpost first (at least slide the seat back as far as possible now). You can find a used 120mm stem for next to nothing. This won't be good for tight singletrack but sounds like you aren't riding that yet. Also try different grips and adjusting the angle of the bar. Grips and bar angle alone have solved hand/wrist pain for me in the past.



    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk
    My seat in those photos was actually as far forward as possible. Itís now as far back as possible which has definitely created some space between my knees and the handlebars.

    Tbh I didnít even know a stem could any longer than mine. And Fuse is correct, except you donít even have to be going down a driveway, flat terrain and standing up puts you right over the front tire. Iím assuming a longer stem will do so even more?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    Harold. The following is not meant to be harsh.

    Please send through a side pic preferably sitting and standing. Your three quarter view is hard to compare. Further, the gg bike is at the extreme end of modern frame designs. Its not a beginner bike that will see occasional trail use. Its narrowly focused for mountain riding. Steep downs and steep climbs. Its going to have a super long reach super steep seat tube and be slack in head angle.
    You're right that my frame is not comparable in its geometry to what OP is looking for. However, I threw it out as an example and asked if you could include one of yourself on your bike, too. My pic is not a 3/4 view, however. The angle is only slight. I was limited in appropriate picture-taking space because there's very little level ground at all in my neighborhood.

    I can get the pictures you ask for a little later. Further, I can get some for my other bike, which has different geometry still (but still not the same as what OP is likely to buy).

    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    Gg website puts you on a size 1 frame. If we assume 4=xl then 3=L 2=m. Im going to say you are riding a frame thats ine size bigger than recommended for you.
    You are wrong here. GG's size recommendations depend on ride style. Note the stem length recommendations for each size, too. For "all around" they recommend 60mm and for "full throttle" they recommend 32mm. I am only 8mm off of that 32mm stem length recommendation. I also acquired mine before the current recommendations on sizing were even written. Mine was bought by its original owner in late 2017. I bought it used in late 2018, still before the changes they made to their sizing descriptions. Further, my comment on my longer arms is absolutely relevant. I have always liked longer reaches and for every single bicycle I've ever owned, have purchased at the top end, or even a size above the manufacturer's recommendation.

    So while GG recommends the "size 2" for me at my height for "full throttle" riding, my style is more like the all-around. However, I do ride the bike in bigger terrain. But that bigger terrain also includes a lot of gravel road riding to access singletrack and construct loops. And not gnarly 4wd gravel roads, either. Stuff that's open to passenger cars. Stuff that's pretty mellow for the most part. But I also changed the geo by installing a longer fork. So both the head tube and seat tube angles are a bit slacker than listed in the geo charts.

    This is a major failing of using height alone to determine frame size. There are more factors involved determining how a bike fits a person.

    blah blah blah blah details
    I'm telling the guy he needs a bigger bike, so I'm not sure what you think you're accomplishing here. If anything, I think diving into the numbers is a hair confusing. Reach is a frame dimension. By itself, it does not inform us where the handlebars will be. It especially doesn't inform us about how much space there is between the saddle and the handlebars. The Effective Head Tube length does help inform us about where the saddle is in relationship to the head tube of the bike, which gets us a little closer. A professional bicycle fitter will actually measure the distance from the nose of the saddle to the handlebars, though. That's not a dimension that's actually given on a geometry chart, but it's something that a rider certainly feels when they climb onto a bike. The Reach and the ETT plus the stem length can help give us a rough idea of what that dimension is likely to be.

    Looking at reach dimensions alone really doesn't give the whole story, especially when comparing bikes with different geometries (like you're attempting to do with my bike). What's funny about this, is that measuring the saddle-bars length on both of my bikes (which have significantly different geometries), the Pedalhead is actually 10mm SHORTER than my other bike (also a size medium frame, but with a shorter reach and a slacker seat tube angle), which is also an incredibly comfortable bike.

    Here you go.

    Pedalhead seated:


    DSCF2849 by Nate, on Flickr

    Pedalhead standing:


    DSCF2853 by Nate, on Flickr

    Bucksaw seated (10mm longer saddle-bars):


    DSCF2854 by Nate, on Flickr

    Bucksaw standing:


    DSCF2855 by Nate, on Flickr
    Last edited by Harold; 06-01-2019 at 10:08 AM.

  37. #37
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    Thanks for the pictures Harold. Much better images. Glad you found some flat ground to shoot them from. They are nice bikes!

    to the OP...

    Fat bikes are normally built with substantially lower stack heights. Snow riding (primarily). This keeps the whole bike lower and allows you to put a foot down, which then sinks into the snow, hopefully you dont loose your footing and fall over.

    You can see the knee position on the fat bike is above the bars where as in the other top image you can see that the stack is much higher and the knee is much lower. The bike in the top image is built to go down steep trails and higher bars will aid in control vs having them lower as on the fat bike.

    The two bikes provide Harold very different options to choose from depending on the riding conditions/location.

    You indicated in the beginning that your looking at changing your bike to be more comfortable. Did you have any luck locating any xxl frames to try?

  38. #38
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    Updated.
    Last edited by Fuse6F; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:20 PM.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fuse6F View Post
    Thanks for the pictures Harold. Much better images. Glad you found some flat ground to shoot them from. They are nice bikes!

    to the OP...

    Fat bikes are normally built with substantially lower stack heights. Snow riding (primarily). This keeps the whole bike lower and allows you to put a foot down, which then sinks into the snow, hopefully you dont loose your footing and fall over.

    You can see the knee position on the fat bike is above the bars where as in the other top image you can see that the stack is much higher and the knee is much lower. The bike in the top image is built to go down steep trails and higher bars will aid in control vs having them lower as on the fat bike.

    The two bikes provide Harold very different options to choose from depending on the riding conditions/location.

    You indicated in the beginning that your looking at changing your bike to be more comfortable. Did you have any luck locating any xxl frames to try?
    I wouldn't say I'm upgrading to a new bike for comfort. I'm upgrading because I want something more capable and that doesn't have shitty brakes and gears. I'd also like something that fits me normally. I did figure out the hand issue by turning the handlebars down a bit. The seat was all the way back but that wasn't a good fit either. I'll post a photo with the seat adjustment soon.

    I put together a list of bikes that I hope will help once I learn more about sizing and what fits me. No bike shop near me has XXL bikes. It's kind of frustrating. The only thing I can do is look at where I'm at on my current bike and look at other specs and see where I could benefit from more length.

    Here's that list:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Bike Selection Help-2019-06-03-17_58_34-bike-spreadsheet.pdf-adobe-acrobat-reader-dc.jpg  


  40. #40
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    Nice list. Can see your getting serious and doing some homework.

    There is a forum for clydes. Big and tall riders.

    https://forums.mtbr.com/clydesdales-...s-1043334.html


    Strive looks promising!!!




    Cheers.

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