Bike Maintenance class worth it?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    190

    Bike Maintenance class worth it?

    The intermediate class is $250 9 hrs over 3 days. Includes park big blue boom or bicycle repair or advance course for $500 park big blue book repair, 18 hrs over six evenings?

    Since I don't know much about repairing or maintanence of my bike. Think these classes r worth it?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    210
    If you are at all able to use normal tools then just learning yourself is better. The only reason you would really need a class is to learn more in depth stuff that may or may not be what some people are looking for.

    There is a wealth of info on the net and thanks to that I have learned how to pretty much build up or tear down an entire bike. The net has walk through and how to's that even have pictures and info as to why and when you would need to do something. If all else fails post on here cause there are a ton of people that know everything about bikes and fixing them.

    Now shock rebuilding class I would be interested in but thats just cause I would love to rebuild my own shocks.

    In my humble opinion save that $250 and get some tools and parts that you would replace due to wear. Simple tools to start with or at least its what I got and is just based on what I needed and my own opinion. A chain breaker, Chain whip, sproket tool, Cassette tool, chain links, Cable ends, and some good waterproof grease like Philwood. You should have plenty of that $250 left over so get some cold brew or whatever else you enjoy and well enjoy.

    Hope that helps and I am sure you will get other good opinions as well.

  3. #3
    2010 RockHopper Comp Disc
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    595
    trial and error seems, at least for me the best way to learn.

  4. #4
    Thread Killer
    Reputation: bucksaw87's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    762
    i was told, at a job interview at a bike shop, that my being hired was contingent upon having completed a maintenance class like that...i didn't get the job simply because of that; it would've been too time-consuming for the shop to train me up to their specifications. so, if you plan on getting a job in a bike shop anytime in the near future, it's good resume fodder. otherwise, parktool.com, sheldonbrown.com and the forums here have any information you'll ever need for wrenching your own stuff.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dremer03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    3,656
    I dont think you need the classes. I took no classes and I can do basic installs and adjustments, even built a few bikes. All I did was hung out with other bike guys who showed me how to do stuff and the rest I learned watching you tube videos done by bike mechanics and even most manufacturers put up installation videos.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,150
    I teach classes like this. 6 two hour sessions and they can be a lot of fun depending on the mechanical aptitude of the people in the class. Everybody comes away with a better knowledge of not only how to do the work but which tool is the right one for the job. There is usually quite a bit of discussion about compatibility of parts also. You would be amazed how many people truly have no idea how to lube a chain and just how long some of them can take to fix a flat.

    Obviously I'm going to vote in favor of making the investment in taking a repair class...

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    190
    Thanks for the info. I will YouTube and fourms search. I'd rather save the money for new parts and tools. Seems easy enough..... I hope.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Dremer03's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    3,656
    Quote Originally Posted by smileyboy
    Thanks for the info. I will YouTube and fourms search. I'd rather save the money for new parts and tools. Seems easy enough..... I hope.
    If you can work on a car, house repairs or computer repairs you can easily handle working on a bike. So if you can do any of the above I think you can easily handle doing basic maintenance to installing parts.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: clutch_08's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    356
    i learned every thing from you tube... and it cost me nothing

  10. #10
    too cold to ride
    Reputation: BigSharks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1,130
    ^^Me too- from basic wrenching to bunny hops.

    If you ever want to get frustrated, watch the pros change a tire and tube. I wanted to teach myself to do it lever-free and almost self-amputated my fingers while I was trying so hard (and unsuccessfully).
    Now go home and get your ******* shinebox.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    48
    Ouch, $250 is steep. A cheap way to learn about bike maintenance is to volunteer at a bike co-op in your area which fixes bikes for low income folks.

  12. #12
    i also unicycle
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    2,043
    as said, it seems a bit steep. maybe it's really really intense instruction and super duper hands on. ask why it's so high, when lots of places off park "tool school" for much less. if you learn best in that kind of setting, it could be worth it. might be worth looking into.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
    bikes & beers (on my blog) http://idontrideenough.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    XC Ground Pounder
    Reputation: quietcornerrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    408
    Damn near everything you'd learn in that class, you can learn off the internet. Especially youtube, expert village, and some DIY instructables. Tearing your own bike apart is the greatest teacher of all.
    Well, since they gave us a KHS forum, I guess I have to come up with something else for a sig.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    190
    Thanks guys, I've found a ton of videos. Just changed my pedals today.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,106
    Quote Originally Posted by clutch_08
    i learned every thing from you tube... and it cost me nothing

    Ditto that! No way I'd pay to attend a class unless maybe I was working towards becoming a professional mechanic.
    So far you tube has been a huge help to me and has saved me money for sure!

  16. #16
    29er Fan Boy
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    76
    Bicycletutor.com seems to have some good videos. It'll at least get you familiar with the concepts.

  17. #17
    LCI #1853
    Reputation: PscyclePath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    328
    Quote Originally Posted by quietcornerrider
    Tearing your own bike apart is the greatest teacher of all.
    Yes... but putting it back together again so that everything stills works is the art of the deal ;-)
    Ride a mountain bike... you will not regret it if you live.
    (with apologies to Mark Twain & The Taming of the Bicycle)

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    587
    Wow, these damn seminars spread to Bikes too. For profession maybe (as a formality) or employee competence ; for DIY.. HELLS NO!
    -Don "LordDRIFT" Draper.

  19. #19
    Have Cake and beat it 2
    Reputation: AusMTB Orienteer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    291
    also some DVD's out there for MTB fundimentals are a good source. Forums like these are awesome sources of info. I doubt that there is anything that these folks couldn't solve bar the bike falling apart.
    One shop I know runs basic maintenance classes, 1 hour class on things like tyre repairs and an advanced class. Will answer most questions and one guy going on a long journey was pulled aside and given further info for trail repairs when miles from anywhere.
    sheldon brown is also a good source.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DeepseaDebo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    247
    i'm also a big fan of get the wrench and tinker, help you develop your own system for a process rather than learning another persons way and then turning it into your way
    Hooyah space monkey

    What doesn't kill you makes you stronger. What doesn't kill me, dies.

    deep sea CCLXXXI

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.