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Thread: Bike Grease

  1. #1
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    Bike Grease

    my new bike comes in monday and i wanted to know what grease i needed for the seatpost and other parts. can i get it at walmart?

  2. #2
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    Um...I doubt walmart would be a good source for the right kind of grease. Most bike shops use lithium grease (white stuff). I've had good luck with Phil Wood Waterproof grease (kinda green).

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    any bike grease would be fine for using on things like you seatpost. i like Finish Line Premium grease. a tube of bike grease is usually only a couple of bucks and will last a pretty long time.

    you'll also need chain lube, dont put grease on your chain!!! for chain lube i usually use Triflow or White Lightning Epic lube.

  5. #5
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    Super TECH White Grease in a spray can.<B> <------ White Stuff</B>
    (Easy to lube cables etc...)

    Super TECH Extreme Pressure Multi-Duty Complex grease <B> <-------Red Stuff</B>
    (Works great for bearings, much better than the bicycle specific grease)
    and it's under $3 for a one pound can

    Available at Wmart

    Have fun Riding
    Last edited by KevinBicycle; 03-30-2008 at 12:11 AM.

  6. #6
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    I wouldn't use walmart grease for anything on my bike. I use Park PL1000 grease, available at any bike shop for about 3-4 bux for a tube. Any grease from a bike shop is good. I used to use White Lightning lube on my chain, but recently switched to Pro Link wet lube. I like it much better.
    I usually use tri flow on my cables if they need lubing, and also on derailuer pivots etc.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

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    What about lubing and greasing your bike for cold winter riding? Check out icebike.org.Put"winterizing your freehubs" in the search.The tool you need to get inside of your Shimano freehub is at biketoolsetc.com and is called the EVT Shimano freehub tool.Then I heard of putting a little anti freeze in your chainlube in the winter.The Lubriplate Mag1 he is talking about cost about $4.00 a big tube.Go to lubriplate.com for a dealer near you.Always glad to help out.---zarr

  8. #8
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    actually, automotive wheel bearing grease is the same thing. no need to buy overpriced "bike grease".

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    I heard automotive and motorcycle grease is too thick for bike wheel bearings.

  10. #10
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    I heard a tip about repairing hub cones and bearing races.(1) take one ball out (2)pack the cone and race with polishing compound.(3)put it back together and ride your bike a while-(not sure how long,but not too long-like one good ride).(4)Disassemble,clean the cone and race real good and throw away the bearings and install new ones. Good repair tip.

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    And use a good grease.

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    Automotive grease works well for most bike applications if you're not racing. If you deal with loose bearings an important attribute of grease is it's ability to hold the bearings in place while you assemble things, but loose balls are getting less and less common these days. I have a lot of older bikes. Phil Wood grease is very good at sticking bearings in place if you are dealing with shimano hubs or FSA pig headsets.

    Perhaps the most important thing is that not all grease is compatible some of the stuff gets thinned out when incompatible grease contaminates it. I thought I read that Phil wood is compatible with most greases, but I cant remember for sure.

    Hope that helps.

    Cheers, Jim

  13. #13
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    nope. general purpose auto grease works perfectly. the grease they sell for marine use (boat trailers entering water) is slightly tackier however.

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    I got a big tub of Bel Ray motorcycle grease,but I'm kind of skeptical about using it in my hubs.The Lubriplate Mag 1 I talked abut goes down to -60 degrees F.I'm thinking about adding some or using it in hubs.Gonna try it in a beater bike first though.

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    I picked up the 1lb tub of the

    Super TECH Extreme Pressure Multi-Duty Complex grease <-------Red Stuff
    (Works great for bearings, much better than the bicycle specific grease)
    and it's under $3 for a one pound can

    that kevincycle mentioned at walmart just the other day. Im definitely no expert, but I used it to install my new pedals and on the cleats in my shoes. I feel pretty confident that any sort of grease would work in that sort of situation. As well as on your seatpost.

    If your really worried about it just suck it up and make the haul to a bikeshop and buy some overpriced bike grease. Good luck with the new bike.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoobHill
    I picked up the 1lb tub of the

    Super TECH Extreme Pressure Multi-Duty Complex grease <-------Red Stuff
    (Works great for bearings, much better than the bicycle specific grease)
    and it's under $3 for a one pound can

    that kevincycle mentioned at walmart just the other day. Im definitely no expert, but I used it to install my new pedals and on the cleats in my shoes. I feel pretty confident that any sort of grease would work in that sort of situation. As well as on your seatpost.

    If your really worried about it just suck it up and make the haul to a bikeshop and buy some overpriced bike grease. Good luck with the new bike.
    It's really good grease. It also works great for repacking wheel bearings, bottom bracket bearings and headset bearings.
    <B>Note:</B><I>It's important to totally dismantle and clean out old grease and fully inspect all parts before repacking grease in wheel bearings, bottom bracket and headset. Also do it in a clean environment, so not to chance getting any debris in there.</I>
    I've heard that many riders use a 50/50 mix of the axle grease and the white bicycle type grease. The white grease is good but isn't very thick and tends to liquify easily, so the axle grease adds thickness to it.
    I just simply use 100% Super TECH Extreme Pressure Multi-Duty Complex grease <----Red Stuff with great results. They sell it at Wmart. It also works good on brake and derailer cables where the cable is inside the cable casing. You'll need to take it apart to grease.

    Have fun and ride safe

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    bike grease

    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann View Post
    I wouldn't use walmart grease for anything on my bike. I use Park PL1000 grease, available at any bike shop for about 3-4 bux for a tube. Any grease from a bike shop is good. I used to use White Lightning lube on my chain, but recently switched to Pro Link wet lube. I like it much better.
    I usually use tri flow on my cables if they need lubing, and also on derailuer pivots etc.
    I learned teh hard way that some bike grease is a result of thinning cheapo grease , the Park grease allowed my rear hub bearings to RUST ie lube failure in rain and damage hub. Im sure if the grease was Phil wood, or a heavier auto Bearing grease like the Super Tech, it would have remained lubricated and protected. I was on this post looking to see what some think of that Super Tech red NLGI rated hi temp auto/truck grease.

  18. #18
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    only bike specific lubes i use are for fork and shock, otherwise its marine grease for everything

  19. #19
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    Dont grease your seat post. It just makes a mess. If you ride and maintain your bike at least once a year or two, its not helpful.

    If you want to leave a bike outside for 5 years, grease it up. Otherwise leave it clean and dry.

  20. #20
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    are you serious?

    if so, i disagree as creaks often come from a dry post. ask my ol' lady

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