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  1. #1
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    Bicycle Lock?

    I am thinking about using a cable lock which has overlapping steel jackets threaded over the cable. Like the picture shown here

    How is that compared to a equally priced U-lock?

  2. #2
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    I like it better that the u-locks. You can wrap both frame and fork.
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    Just remember, a lock only keeps the honest people honest.
    If a thief wants your bike bad enough no lock will keep them from getting it.

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    ^this.

    Looks like a fine option for a low-crime area, and easier to use than a u-lock, but probably a bit less secure. Personally I only lock my bikes anywhere if I am only running inside for a minute (convenient store, takeout lunch, etc) and for those purposes these are fine. If you're going for longer, less attended periods of being locked you need to buy up accordingly.

    Only the heaviest and most expensive locks like the Kryptonite New York series can be trusted for real theft protection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock dude View Post
    Just remember, a lock only keeps the honest people honest.
    If a thief wants your bike bad enough no lock will keep them from getting it.
    I wish I could find that vid of the guy stealing a guys bike at a mall and the owner confronts him.
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  6. #6
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    These locks are for low risk situations. I use a combination cable lock for quick stops at the store. It wraps around my rear rack easily enough. My bike stays in my office all day so I don't need to do extended lockups.

    I need to get a u-lock eventually, but it's currently so uncommon that I would need to lock my bike up for that long that I'm usually able to work around those situations.

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    I have copied and pasted my response from another lock thread. It all depends on where you are wanting to lock your bike. I would never leave mine unattended for long or at all. I use the chain lock described below in two situations. One, in my basement where I store my bike. Two, returning from the trail and I have to run into the store to get a 12 pack or such. Other than that I am either on my bike or it is in one of the locations described above.

    I have an old rigid POS bike I will ride around town. On those occasions I do use a cable lock simply to prevent someone from riding off on it. My trail bike doesn't see city/commuting duty. A small U Lock is better though.

    Cable locks are crap. You can seriously cut one into by using a garden shear or lopper with minimal effort. I had to cut one off because my son forgot the combination. I was surprised how little effort it took to cut the cable. I literally had it cut in less than 5 seconds.

    Its not real cheap but buy 6 feet of the heaviest duty chain you can find, and a quality master lock. Use an old 29er tube, run the chain through it and zip tie the ends to the second to the last links. It is heavy as hell, but much better than a cable. I'm sure you can get through with a quality bolt cutter or grinder but I think both my chain and lock are rated at 10,000 pounds. I think it ran me about $40. Of course you can use longer lengths of chain if desired. Probably weighs about 15 pound so not exactly something you will through in your backpack and ride with.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattnmtns View Post
    I have copied and pasted my response from another lock thread. It all depends on where you are wanting to lock your bike. I would never leave mine unattended for long or at all. I use the chain lock described below in two situations. One, in my basement where I store my bike. Two, returning from the trail and I have to run into the store to get a 12 pack or such. Other than that I am either on my bike or it is in one of the locations described above.

    I have an old rigid POS bike I will ride around town. On those occasions I do use a cable lock simply to prevent someone from riding off on it. My trail bike doesn't see city/commuting duty. A small U Lock is better though.

    Cable locks are crap. You can seriously cut one into by using a garden shear or lopper with minimal effort. I had to cut one off because my son forgot the combination. I was surprised how little effort it took to cut the cable. I literally had it cut in less than 5 seconds.

    Its not real cheap but buy 6 feet of the heaviest duty chain you can find, and a quality master lock. Use an old 29er tube, run the chain through it and zip tie the ends to the second to the last links. It is heavy as hell, but much better than a cable. I'm sure you can get through with a quality bolt cutter or grinder but I think both my chain and lock are rated at 10,000 pounds. I think it ran me about $40. Of course you can use longer lengths of chain if desired. Probably weighs about 15 pound so not exactly something you will through in your backpack and ride with.
    Hate to tell you this but pad locks are worthless



    Have a beater bike at a real bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by austanian View Post
    Hate to tell you this but pad locks are worthless



    Have a beater bike at a real bike.
    The more you know

    As said before locks are for honest people. Going to have to try this at home and see if it works. Thanks for posting it.

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    That works for the padlocks that can be shut with the key out. i.e. - 'click' to lock it.

    If you have to have the key engaged to close the lock, it uses a different latch mechanism. All of my newer padlocks have the less convenient, but marginally more secure, key-in to lock.

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    Quote Originally Posted by axisofoil View Post
    That works for the padlocks that can be shut with the key out. i.e. - 'click' to lock it.

    If you have to have the key engaged to close the lock, it uses a different latch mechanism. All of my newer padlocks have the less convenient, but marginally more secure, key-in to lock.
    Also good to know. What brand are you using?

    FWIW I just tried making some shims and opening my lock. I couldn't get it to work, but can totally see it working.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zskf1 View Post
    I am thinking about using a cable lock which has overlapping steel jackets threaded over the cable. Like the picture shown here
    How is that compared to a equally priced U-lock?
    I like that one. It looks harder to get into than a Ulock, and too big for a typical boltcutter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattnmtns View Post
    Also good to know. What brand are you using?

    FWIW I just tried making some shims and opening my lock. I couldn't get it to work, but can totally see it working.
    The shim trick is a bit 'trickier' than they make it out to be.

    Don't put it straight in. Try to rock it left and right (not around the circular part, but rather side-to-side while looking at the "thin" side of the lock.)

    I use the mid-grade "commercial" master-locks and brinks locks. Available at walmart... convenient.

    I am well versed in the "honest people honest". High-end security of any sort is a matter of "How much do I want to pay... and how long do I need this lock to hold out against someone stealing my stuff". It's not a matter of IF someone can get in, it's a matter of "how fast" someone can. So, for me, $30 locks are "good enough" for everything I use them for (mainly locking pelican cases while on locking motorcycle racks).

    For the record, I don't lock my bike up anywhere... so bike-specific stuff isn't something I have much direct experience with. If I were to commute (I don't, it's 35 miles each way in Arizona - ouch), I could keep the thing in my office. It sits in my garage surrounded by shooting targets with sub-3" groups of high-caliber holes in them (also, it's insured and not worth a lot to begin with) or under myself.

    So, lock it up the best you can... but bottom line, people suck. Look at your cost-benefit ratio for what you are securing. $250 worth of lock weighing 15 lbs used to secure a $400 bike... not reasonable in my book.
    Last edited by axisofoil; 09-17-2012 at 09:52 AM.

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    lock is useless when meeting a professional thief.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cash Hunter View Post
    lock is useless when meeting a professional thief.
    lucky most thieves are not professional.

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    Not useless. Locks slow down thieves. Better locks slow them down more. Cheap locks might not slow them more than a moment... But still slow them down.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by austanian View Post
    Hate to tell you this but pad locks are worthless



    Have a beater bike at a real bike.
    That video is from 2008. I would think Masterlock would have made improvements since then.
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    Quote Originally Posted by zskf1 View Post
    I am thinking about using a cable lock which has overlapping steel jackets threaded over the cable. Like the picture shown here

    How is that compared to a equally priced U-lock?
    Bike locks don't work if you have any quick release parts that can't be locked up. And even then, almost any bike lock can be defeated in a few seconds. As others have mentioned, don't relay on a lock to keep your bike safe.
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  20. #20
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    So, a lock won't keep it safe (Maybe "safe" for an extra 1-3 seconds or in the case of the huge, heavy-duty chains that weigh in at over 15lbs, maybe even a few minutes).

    Is having it within eyesight/your control going to keep it safe against some guy with an angle grinder?

    I know that a lot of (most of) the members on here don't carry firearms... so how are you planning stopping the guy with the angle grinder or bolt-cutters?

  21. #21
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    I don't trust bike locks at all, and it's mostly because I don't trust strangers being around my relatively expensive bike. With that being said. my bike only travels from the garage -> bike rack -> trail and reverse the process when I finish riding. If for whatever reason I'm on a bike and need to go to the store, it's going to be on my 15 year old wal-mart bike with the rusted chain and seat that won't move.

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    Not sure if you still can, but you use to be able to open a master lock with two hammers as well.

    With the two hammers, you hit both sides of the lock at the same time and the lock would just fall open. Didn't have to beat on it, just a good solid smack,

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    Any cable lock is crap. Get a u-lock and locking wheel skewers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Turbopit View Post
    Not sure if you still can, but you use to be able to open a master lock with two hammers as well.

    With the two hammers, you hit both sides of the lock at the same time and the lock would just fall open. Didn't have to beat on it, just a good solid smack,
    In days past, pad lock companies used flat wedge type tabs to secure the shackle. All one had to do was deliver a strong down ward blow to the lock body near the shackle. This would shear the tab completely off freeing the shackle. Pad locks have switched to using bearings now days which only spin when being struck by a hammer. Cheaper padlocks sill use tabs though.

    Example of bearing locking shackle.

    Abloy Super Weather Padlocks - - YouTube

    Anyhow, all locks can be defeated but not all padlocks are created equal. I use a Master Lock Pro Series 6327 on my storage units. You can't cut the lock and it uses anti-picking pins. Yes, this lock can be picked but the lock has a removable core used for rekeying. So I rekeyed it going against conventional locksmithing rekeying methods which add to the difficulty of being picked. Even still, all one has to do is drill the lock creating what locksmiths call an "Artificial Shear-Line." It's hard to explain but basically achieving the effect of using a key. That's why I use drill resistant pins. Now nothing is drill proof but drill resistant pins don't make it easy. I guess with the right tools, anything is possible. You just don't wan to make it easy.

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