The ass stops hurting right?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    The ass stops hurting right?

    This might be my second post on the forum since I signed up in...2012? Anyways. Since the Wuhan is here, GF and I decided that riding bikes would be better than sitting on the couch shoveling doritos into our mouth holes.

    We're both mid 30s, average build, sit at desks all day, and figured, "Hey, we got this!"

    I have a '12 Cannondale Trail SL4 I bought new. She had some ancient Schwinn craigslist full suspension V brake bike that weighed more than my pickup.

    So I said I'll take the bikes down to get serviced and we can go riding again. The owner of the bike shop, by some odd stroke of misfortune or luck actually remembered me from when I had bought my bike 8 years ago. He politely asked me if I wanted to pay money to service the schwinn. I said, "Nope! Toss it in the trash and point me to what a lady can ride around the neighborhood and some dirt roads."

    So I got my bike serviced and brought the missus home a Cannondale Tango.

    And then I looked at her bike next to mine, and my god, they all have giant tires now. My 26" looks like a BMX next to her slick new ride.

    So we put our helmets on, and like a good suburban white couple in cargo shorts, we rode for about a mile and nearly died.

    It's been a week now. Both our asses hurt prodigiously, she managed to eat it on a curb already not paying attention, and living at 5200' is doing us no favors. But we've been out every night, and we're up to 4 miles before almost dying. Good news for both of us, we're still looking forward to our evening rides, so this might actually stick.

    Important lessons:

    1. I am not 20 anymore, and I cannot rip down a mountain as fast as the bike will go (not yet at least). And I definitely can't pedal up that mountain right now.

    2. I don't like having what looks like a kid's bike next to that 29" monster. Catching up on all I've missed in the better part of a decade tells me that another grand or two spent now is going to get me an infinitely better bike than the one I have. But my bike is still running good with low miles, so we'll see what happens after the summer.

    Anyways, 2 more riders back in the saddle in Northern Nevada!

  2. #2
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    Good saddles help alot, get rid of the stock ones which are basically torture devices.

    Dont hate on your 26. Still 26" wheel bikes being sold new. Dont have to go 29er, also have 27.5. You have options.

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  3. #3
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    Yes, but for an off the couch rider I'd expect a month plus before you feel no pain. Play with the saddle angle a little bit.

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  4. #4
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    3 general possible reasons:

    • Your back, legs, and arms are weak/tired, leaving your butt to carry an absurd amount of weight on mostly two bony points
    • Your butt is soft and pampered, therefore sensitive (many years spent on couch, bed, cushy supportive car seat)
    • Your butt may have a wound on it, like a boil or infected abrasion (not surprising if the above is true, and you went too far on your first few rides)


    You likely need a combination of solutions to address this issue. Without throwing money at the problem, you can:

    • get more fit. Your back, legs, and arms can then have more stamina to pick up some of the load in carrying your weight
    • toughen your butt. Ride until it hurts and, if it still is sore from the prior day, do a short ride rather than take a day off, in order to build tolerance.
    • adjust the fit of your bike. If youíre too upright, your back and arms canít help as much.
    • beware of backpacks. Carrying weight needlessly on your back will fatigue you sooner. Find a way to stow things on the bike itself.
    • spend more time riding out-of-the-saddle. It might seem more fatiguing to ride this way, but the more you do it, the more efficient it gets.
    • distract yourself or immerse yourself into something that takes your mind off of your body and bike. Maybe some nice scenery is enough.
    • take breaks on your ride to loosen up in ways that canít be done on the bike. If you spot a public park or shaded bench, or street vendor, why not partake in taking in the world around you, and create a landmark memory?


    Many shorter rides toughens your ass more effectively than the same mileage squeezed into longer epic rides, building up layers of tough skin from the inside-out. Taking your conscious mind off of things lets your subconscious figure things out to "balance" things, perhaps doing a better job at it if poor uninformed robotic logical thinking is what your conscious mind is capable of.

    Budget in some money to throw at the problem and you can:

    - find a saddle that spreads out the force over a wider area. Ever sit on a steel tubular handrail? Uncomfortable to do so with your bony parts without supporting some weight with your hands and maybe a stiffened back and feet, right? Turn yourself to straddle that hand rail between your legs, on your bony groin parts, and imagine the pain. Itís not so bad when itís wide like a concrete retaining wall, right? Itís not the padding, itís the width and shape. Wide works even without padding. Beware of when itís full of padding, as extra friction can make your butt feel inflamed and cause abrasions.

    - upgrading your clothing. You can choose to use padded bike shorts and chamois cream (pronounced like shamwow, nicknamed shammy). The cream keeps the bacteria from multiplying and makes the skin less prone to damage (not so dry and flaky). You get what you pay for with bike shorts. High quality athletic underwear works fine, if you choose a good saddle, got fit, and toughened your butt already.

    - you can get a better bike that fits and rides better. Whole other topic...

    Hereís an informative video on bike saddles, if youíre curious enough to learn about these things more in-depth:

    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Varaxis View Post
    3 general possible reasons:

    • Your back, legs, and arms are weak/tired, leaving your butt to carry an absurd amount of weight on mostly two bony points
    • Your butt is soft and pampered, therefore sensitive (many years spent on couch, bed, cushy supportive car seat)
    • Your butt may have a wound on it, like a boil or infected abrasion (not surprising if the above is true, and you went too far on your first few rides)


    You likely need a combination of solutions to address this issue. Without throwing money at the problem, you can:

    • get more fit. Your back, legs, and arms can then have more stamina to pick up some of the load in carrying your weight
    • toughen your butt. Ride until it hurts and, if it still is sore from the prior day, do a short ride rather than take a day off, in order to build tolerance.
    • adjust the fit of your bike. If youíre too upright, your back and arms canít help as much.
    • beware of backpacks. Carrying weight needlessly on your back will fatigue you sooner. Find a way to stow things on the bike itself.
    • spend more time riding out-of-the-saddle. It might seem more fatiguing to ride this way, but the more you do it, the more efficient it gets.
    • distract yourself or immerse yourself into something that takes your mind off of your body and bike. Maybe some nice scenery is enough.
    • take breaks on your ride to loosen up in ways that canít be done on the bike. If you spot a public park or shaded bench, or street vendor, why not partake in taking in the world around you, and create a landmark memory?


    Budget in some money to throw at the problem and you can:

    - find a saddle that spreads out the force over a wider area. Ever sit on a steel tubular handrail? Uncomfortable to do so with your bony parts without supporting some weight with your hands and maybe a stiffened back and feet, right? Turn yourself to straddle that hand rail between your legs, on your body groin parts, and imagine the pain. Itís not so bad when itís wide like a concrete retaining wall, right? Itís not the padding, itís the width and shape. Wide works even without padding. Beware of when itís full of padding, as extra friction can make your butt feel inflamed and cause abrasions.

    - upgrading your clothing. You can choose to use padded bike shorts and chamois cream (pronounced like shamwow, nicknamed shammy). The cream keeps the bacteria from multiplying and makes the skin less prone to damage (not so dry and flaky). You get what you pay for with bike shorts. High quality athletic underwear works fine, if you choose a good saddle, got fit, and toughened your butt already.

    - you can get a better bike that fits and rides better. Whole other topic...

    Hereís an informative video on bike saddles, if youíre curious enough to learn about these things more in-depth:

    What a fantastic and thoughtful reply, thank you!

    My gut is telling me right now it's simply because we've been lazy POS's for the last half a dozen years. I will order us some comfier saddles, and we'll continue to ride in the mean time building up some tolerance.

    Thank you for the nice reply.

  6. #6
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    I just upgraded my saddles to 150mm width and all my sit bone pain (and saddle sores) actually went away. Most OEM saddles I've seen are around 135mm in width. For some people, it's just fine. For me, not so much.

    Good saddle fit will go a long way! I actually shelled out $130 for the Specialized Power Comp saddle for my gravel bike. Well worth it!
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  7. #7
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    OP, good post. Thanks for the detail.

    Two things. Get a decent saddle and tire size doesn't matter for what you're doing.

    Ideally you should measure your sit bones and buy a saddle that you're comfortable sitting on. If your soar after 2-3 miles there's two things going on. One, your "sit bones" are still gentle and will toughen up with more usage/time. Two, get some padded bike shorts, aka a chamois.

    Your body will adapt to a saddle over time to a certain extent, but if you're in pain that quickly it's the wrong saddle.

    There are good generic saddles that work for men and/or women that may be a better base/starting point. WTB Volt/pure, SDG Bel-air, SQ Labs has a bunch, but adding proper bike shorts will also improve your experience.

    Do not be lured by the big squishy saddle in the department store, or the seat covers (Don't buy a seat cover, buy a new saddle!!!). those are terrible solutions to comfort issues. The rule is that the padding should be in your bike shorts (aka chamois) not on the saddle.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  8. #8
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    OP - Nice post! Getting back in the saddle too...
    Vancouver, Warshington

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    OP, good post. Thanks for the detail.

    Two things. Get a decent saddle and tire size doesn't matter for what you're doing.

    Ideally you should measure your sit bones and buy a saddle that you're comfortable sitting on. If your soar after 2-3 miles there's two things going on. One, your "sit bones" are still gentle and will toughen up with more usage/time. Two, get some padded bike shorts, aka a chamois.

    Your body will adapt to a saddle over time to a certain extent, but if you're in pain that quickly it's the wrong saddle.

    There are good generic saddles that work for men and/or women that may be a better base/starting point. WTB Volt/pure, SDG Bel-air, SQ Labs has a bunch, but adding proper bike shorts will also improve your experience.

    Do not be lured by the big squishy saddle in the department store, or the seat covers (Don't buy a seat cover, buy a new saddle!!!). those are terrible solutions to comfort issues. The rule is that the padding should be in your bike shorts (aka chamois) not on the saddle.
    Awesome reply, thank you! I used to ride Dual sport motorcycles and one of the first things I always did was order a new Corbin seat (that and it's relatively easy to stand on a powered bike and keep moving). I'm not sure why it didn't dawn on me to think about our butts on our pedal bikes too. When I was in my teens and 20s I just rode whatever came with the bike, because who cared, I'm just bombing up and down mountains anyways. Getting old(er) has a new set of challenges -- like actually having to pay attention to not deliberately abusing your body.

    Thanks for the reply!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamaaina1 View Post
    OP - Nice post! Getting back in the saddle too...
    Welcome back to you as well. And eyyy, Vancouver. We were looking at moving to Portland / Vancouver a bit ago. I grew up in Seattle and miss it up there.

  11. #11
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    Hello,

    I'm 50 now I started riding again a couple years ago, my bike is a Giant Trance adv 2 when i first got it I immediately HAAAAAAAATED the stock saddle ..most stock saddles are hot garbage.

    I have now a WTB Pure cromoly wide saddle (I'm pretty big 6'3" 260lbs)... WTB has a online guide that will suggest a saddle / saddle width based on a few questions ...

    I really like WTB saddles and had them on my bikes back in the 90s when I rode originally...

    Saddle choice is kinda subjective certainly..but finding better saddles will help almost guaranteed.

  12. #12
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    "narrow" saddles are no better or worse than "wide" saddles, you just need to know what your body requires.

    Body size is not an indicator either. I'm 6'3" and the only two saddles I use (after spending years and hundreds of dollars experimenting on dozens of randomly chosen saddles) are narrow and medium. (appx 125-140mm) Using SQ Labs fit system was the major first step towards learning what I needed to be comfortable.
    Last edited by *OneSpeed*; 04-29-2020 at 03:55 AM.
    Rigid SS 29er
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    Stop asking how much it weighs and just go ride it.

  13. #13
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    Two things ,some shops and WTB have demo programs ,you get to try a saddle for awhile if you don't like it try another one. Specialized has what they call a ass o meter ,what it does is measures your sit bones, that where you want most of your weight . All it is ,is a piece of memory foam with a ruler, you can get the numbers in other ways ,but it's somewhere to start.

  14. #14
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    We did 5 miles today and had gas in the tank to spare. This photo was roughly the half way point before we headed home.

    The ass stops hurting right?-72m8d4m.jpg

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    "narrow" saddles are no better or worse the "wide" saddles, you just need to know what your body requires.

    Body size is not an indicator either. I'm 6'3" and the only two saddles I use (after spending years and hundreds of dollars experimenting on dozens of randomly chosen saddles) are narrow and medium. (appx 125-140mm) Using SQ Labs fit system was the major first step towards learning what I needed to be comfortable.
    fair enough.. i did do some other checking but WTB's online guide did point me towards the wide saddles as I have 8" wrists and and in general am kinda big... but indeed wide , medium , narrow aren't better per se it depends on what works for a given person.

  16. #16
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    Saddles are like shoes. everyone needs a different style and size. It takes a while to find exactly what you need. I ride with a brooks b17 on my mtb and my road bike, some love them, some hate them. last week I did a 5 hour ride on my road bike. No Issues.

    Also time in the saddle. You gotta work those butt cushions. It's like working on your yard. you will get blisters on your hands the first time, but after a while you build up your hands. goes the same for your rear.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by kairo View Post
    . I will order us some comfier saddles, .
    wont help.

    I have some pretty hard saddles and am still new, 8 months in, and it does get better, I love my light saddles and they are actually comfy. upgrade this later as what you want now might not be the same 6 months from now

  18. #18
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    Yeah, I'd give it couple of weeks before you spend some money. Your learning curve if you keep at it will be steep, guaranteed. What you think you want now will be different a month or two out.

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  19. #19
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    Post a pic of your wifes butt, itll help with diagnosis

    Welcome back, my simple answer is just ride and ride, the pain goes away
    always mad and usually drunk......

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    Annoyingly people are right in that it is a bit of trial and error to find the right saddle for you.. but stock saddles do generally suck... yes probably as you ride more the stock saddle would hurt less but it is unnecessary torture in my view.. when finding the right after market saddle makes so much difference.

    As I said before I'm a WTB fan my wife like fi'zi:k saddles.. honestly pretty much anything somewhat researched will hurt less than a stock saddle.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg View Post
    Post a pic of your wifes butt, itll help with diagnosis

    Welcome back, my simple answer is just ride and ride, the pain goes away
    Phones have a wide angle lens right???

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    To answer all the saddle responses. Lots of great info!

    Money for comfort isn't hard to come up with (thankfully) so I think i'll do a bit of research and get us a couple of new saddles to try based on some online measuring tools that users have provided.

    In the mean time, we'll keep riding every evening and get our asses to toughen up. If the new "comfier" saddles don't do the trick, we'll try some other ones.

    I really appreciate all of your replies in helping a pair of out of shape folks get back on the horse. Means a lot.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kairo View Post
    Phones have a wide angle lens right???
    I take it you are sure the wife won't be on this site? =)

  24. #24
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    FWIW, I rode my stock saddle for about a month. While the amount of soreness was getting better it didnít go away. Thats when I decided to get a new seat. I didnít spend much, only $30, but I got a 155mm (vs the 135 I had) and the soreness went away pretty much the next ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by atarione View Post
    I take it you are sure the wife won't be on this site? =)
    I doubt it. She was expecting to get her 7,000lb schwinn back from the bike shop tuned up and then she got a new bike. I doubt she'll be here checking the forum. Which is good cause when I spend a couple grand on a new bike in the winter she'll have no idea :P

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by kairo View Post
    Phones have a wide angle lens right???
    she sees that and your sore arse will be the least of your problems
    always mad and usually drunk......

  27. #27
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    OK... A few things. First, I saw this last night before anyone else replied and wanted to say NOT IF YOU'RE IN PRISON! But decided not to.

    Also, size matters! You can't have your girlfriend riding around on bigger wheels than you. It throws off the balance. Go get yourself a Surly Krampus immediately.

    Everyone here is pretty dead on with the saddle advice. It DOES finally stop. Stretching and core exercise helps too. I'll post a link to some good stuff when I find it. Did anyone mention padded bike shorts? Helps a ton!
    I like turtles

  28. #28
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    Don't complicate it. Ride a few times and it will go away. If somehow it doesn't, a different saddle may help. However, in most cases, it hurts because you're new at it or haven't been riding in a while.

  29. #29
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    I like turtles

  30. #30
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    Seeing I do road bike regularly, I've found that hard saddles are the most comfortable. My Specialized Power Comp saddle feels hard as a rock. Once my ass settles in, I can't feel anything and my saddle becomes comfortable! I've been tempted to try the Specialized Phenom on my mountain bike. It could be worth the money seeing the Power Comp works well for me.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorCal_In_AZ View Post
    FWIW, I rode my stock saddle for about a month. While the amount of soreness was getting better it didnít go away. Thats when I decided to get a new seat. I didnít spend much, only $30, but I got a 155mm (vs the 135 I had) and the soreness went away pretty much the next ride.
    Got some more details on this super seat for $30 as well as your basic height/weight type sizes to get an idea of how it would compare for me? I've got a rather narrow factory saddle and I'm a rather large chap so it's a point of contention with the wife and I of our riding hobby. I'd like something that fits me better but price is a concern especially since I'll need to be buying two. When people talk about new saddles they usually are in the hundreds of dollars from the limited posts I've seen and I have zero interest in paying that much for a seat.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ostrichsak View Post
    Got some more details on this super seat for $30 as well as your basic height/weight type sizes to get an idea of how it would compare for me? I've got a rather narrow factory saddle and I'm a rather large chap so it's a point of contention with the wife and I of our riding hobby. I'd like something that fits me better but price is a concern especially since I'll need to be buying two. When people talk about new saddles they usually are in the hundreds of dollars from the limited posts I've seen and I have zero interest in paying that much for a seat.
    Check out the WTB Volt saddle. They have a bunch of different sizes and they run $30-40 depending on where you look. I've used the Volt series for a very long time without any problems.

    I also picked up a Serfas the Spartan 3 saddle (155mm) for $32 through Jenson for one of my other bikes.
    Cannondale Synapse Neo | Salsa Timberjack

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ostrichsak View Post
    Got some more details on this super seat for $30 as well as your basic height/weight type sizes to get an idea of how it would compare for me? I've got a rather narrow factory saddle and I'm a rather large chap so it's a point of contention with the wife and I of our riding hobby. I'd like something that fits me better but price is a concern especially since I'll need to be buying two. When people talk about new saddles they usually are in the hundreds of dollars from the limited posts I've seen and I have zero interest in paying that much for a seat.
    Itís a Specialized Canopy. Picked it up at my local bike shop. Again nothing fancy, but the wider size made a huge difference. For reference, Iím 5í11Ē 220 pounds, average dad bod middle aged guy build.

  34. #34
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    When I ride my MTBs, I have WTB Pure on all of them. I also use padded shorts. When I ride my Dahon to commute, I have either jeans or cargo shorts and I didn't like the Pure.
    I asked my friend at the bike shop what he thought and he handed me a Brooks saddle to try. hard leather. I thought he was crazy.
    Awesome saddle. I ended up buying it.
    I like turtles

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    When I ride my MTBs, I have WTB Pure on all of them. I also use padded shorts. When I ride my Dahon to commute, I have either jeans or cargo shorts and I didn't like the Pure.
    I asked my friend at the bike shop what he thought and he handed me a Brooks saddle to try. hard leather. I thought he was crazy.
    Awesome saddle. I ended up buying it.
    Jeans, Brooks, NY in the name, hmmm....


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  36. #36
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    I ride a brooks so I have no experience with ass pain

  37. #37
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    Each of my bikes have/had a relatively firm saddle. Each are stock. I'm fortunate that they all fit my sit bones. I've had to replace one stock seat from a road bike -needed a seat with a relief, stock had no relief. That was a numbing issue, not a sit bone comfort issue though.

    It's been mentioned enough that you need to find the correct size for you as an individual. I won't go further. I will say though that not all comfy seats are comfy. If you find the super soft plush model that feels like your favorite couch cushion you may be in for more troubles! You sit down on the large piece of foam and where does foam go when it is squeezed. It goes into sensitive places and applies pressure. As you sink into to seat, you could increase pressure on a few sensitive areas. For that exact reason is why you will find a channel in most seats...it's a pressure relief for some pressure areas and nerves. In my case above, I was getting numbing that went away when seated on a seat with a channel. Each of the other bikes I've had have stock seats with a channel in it, including my 2000 Specialized stumpumper hard tail.

    You're up to 5 miles when at one point a mile was an effort. Good you guy two. The picture above makes the ride enjoyable, I'm sure.

    Happy you two are able to get out and enjoy it together.

    One tip and sure fire method to measure sit bones are as follows:
    Stand behind your wife, 2-3 feet back. Have her bend over in front of you. Approach and push around to feel for the sit bones.
    Wait....what was this all about again?

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    Made it another 5 ish miles today. We went half way out into the wind and though, boy this will be nice coming home. Right as we turned around the wind shifted and we got to ride the whole way back into it again.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    Jeans, Brooks, NY in the name, hmmm....


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    Conjure up your best image. I guarantee reality is the complete opposite.
    I like turtles

  40. #40
    turtles make me hot
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    Quote Originally Posted by kairo View Post
    Made it another 5 ish miles today. We went half way out into the wind and though, boy this will be nice coming home. Right as we turned around the wind shifted and we got to ride the whole way back into it again.
    That happens to me when I ride my fat bike on the beach. Totally sucks.
    I like turtles

  41. #41
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    There a local road that seams like no matter which way you it's into the wind.

  42. #42
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    Every butt is different so a seat that fits good for one person might not be a good fit for another person. But buying an after market seat will help out tremendously compared to the stock seats. Too many seats out there, different styles, springers, elastromer, rails, countless contours.

  43. #43
    Rod
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    I didn't read all the replies, but I know of shops that have saddle programs where you put money down, try a seat or as many as you like, and when you find one that works they will put that money toward a new purchase.

    Another method is a 30 day money back guarantee on a saddle purchase. They did this with the Fizik brand. I wish I had these opportunities when my friends and I started. We did a lot of experimenting. I still experiment sometimes, but keep going back to the ones I've had for the last decade.

    Fan favorites are WTB and Specialized saddles. The cost of saddles and experimenting is much cheaper with WTB if you cannot find any of the programs described above at any local bike shops. The heavy WTB seats are roughly 30 bucks. The rocket and volt are very popular for many individuals. Your results may vary, but it's worth looking into.

  44. #44
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    Nope...

    After several hours in the saddle (I know you're not there yet, butt...) it doesn't matter what saddle you use, your taint will suffer.

    Maybe invest in some padded shorts+saddles.

    FYI - biking up the mountain is the best part... that's where you find the gold!

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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by horatiodrome View Post
    I ride a brooks so I have no experience with ass pain
    yup. best saddle I have ever had. my bike came with a nice fi'zi:k but I wore it out. my wife got me the brooks B17 for xmas years back and love it. I have an FSA seatpost that allows me to change my saddle from one bike to another so I do not need a bunch of expensive saddles.

    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    After several hours in the saddle (I know you're not there yet, butt...) it doesn't matter what saddle you use, your taint will suffer.
    I have done 5 hour rides and no pain issues. well at least in my ass.

    But most of all you need time in the saddle.
    Dont make me go all Jonathan Winters on this gas station.

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    Um, so guys. I have no self control.

    2019 Salsa Timberjack SLX

    The owner of the shop spent about 45 minutes of his time to totally set up the bike to fit me. Seat, fork, control positioning. Showed me all the cool features, answered all my questions. Huge shoutout to Bike Habitat in Carson City, NV.

    The ass stops hurting right?-j0sepxx.jpg

  47. #47
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    Did you restore the balance? Do you have bigger wheels now?
    Last edited by NYrr496; 05-01-2020 at 03:45 AM.
    I like turtles

  48. #48
    cmg
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    Quote Originally Posted by kairo View Post
    Um, so guys. I have no self control.

    2019 Salsa Timberjack SLX

    The owner of the shop spent about 45 minutes of his time to totally set up the bike to fit me. Seat, fork, control positioning. Showed me all the cool features, answered all my questions. Huge shoutout to Bike Habitat in Carson City, NV.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Fv<king tops
    always mad and usually drunk......

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    True, I agree with you

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post



    Did you restore the balance? Do you have bigger wheels now?

    Equal size now with the GFs bike, but my knobs are bigger haha.

  51. #51
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    Welcome to the TJ family! I just got my TJ SLX 27.5+ a couple weeks ago and tossed 3Ē tires on it. Definitely fun! Have a great time out there! Donít forget to join us on the Timberjack thread over in the Salsa forum.




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  52. #52
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    Saddle area comfort comes from alot of different things.

    1) firstly you need the area toughened up a bit. I did a lot of riding then took a 8 year break. Got back on the same bike and it took time for me get comfortable on the seat again. Nothing wrong any of my gear. I was just soft and after a few weeks of riding multiple times a week it went away.

    2) Proper shorts. Good short look like they have pads, but that is chamios and not really a pad. It there to wick away moisture (sweat) and keep the skin from chaffing. Once you get the basic area tough then things like chaffing after time, movement and sweat. This rubs the skin and causes issues at the skin level. The other think tight shorts do is to keep boys out of the way so you don't smash them. Over the year I have used cheap chamios and really nice ones. The really nice ones are expensive, but at 6-7 hours they are still so nice.

    3) Fit on the bike. If you don't fit well on the bike it will cause pain in all kinds of places.

    4) Saddle... once you have the basics down then saddle is important. Every saddle is little different and every's butt is different. So what works for me may not work for you. Could be padding density, size, shape, stiffness, etc. The thing to remember is bigger and more padded is not always better. I can often be worse if the saddles does not match your fit.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

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    It stopped hurting so much.

  54. #54
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    Sometimes just talking about it helps.
    This space intentionally left blank. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Sometimes just talking about it helps.

    That and daily rides for over a week sure did!

  56. #56
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    I admit that I went a few months of 1 epic ride a week without ever toughening my own butt, and buying a saddle as a solution, when multiple rides a week did it for me too. I did mileage that would put others to shame (if forecasting an annual total), but just the long breaks of "rest days" made all my effort result in no real progress, just maybe enough "rent" paid to maintain current fitness.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

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