Anyone upgrade EVERYTHING on an entry level bike?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Anyone upgrade EVERYTHING on an entry level bike?

    I'm wondering if anyone else has ever done this. I just converted my Specialized hrxc to a 9 speed setup from 7 and realized the only thing and I truly mean the only item that's stock besides the frame is the front derailleur which will likely be a birthday or Christmas present.

    Anyone else go this route instead of just buying a new bike?
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  2. #2
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    Meaning no offense by this...
    I would say anyone that upgrades everything (except the frame) on an entry level bike is a fool.

    The frames on entry level bikes tend to be OK for entry level bikes, but they're not really good enough to warrent totally upgrading.
    Some are OK (and upgrading a few parts that break is obviously no biggie) but when it gets to the point that you're upgrading expensive parts (like wheelset, brakes, fork) you're better off getting a better frame or a whole bike with the quality of parts that you want.

    The frame is one of the most important parts of your bike - to upgrade everything else and neglect to upgrade the frame just seems ludicrous to me.

  3. #3
    spec4life???..smh...
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    sounds like your next upgrade should be a frame...

  4. #4
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    Next upgrade is going to be a frame, looking at one of the Giant FS frames.

    I was just wondering if anyone else had taken an entry level bike to this extreme. It's been a lot of fun, starting with my first bike in over 10 years and progressing as my skill level went up. I would still do it this way again.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  5. #5
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    I haven't, but i do plan on upgrading many of the components on my Rockhopper as they break, with the goal of eventually swapping everything over to a better frame.

  6. #6
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    My 2 year old Rockhopper has a stock seatpost, BB and cranks. Besides the cockpit, everything was upgraded because it broke or I wore it out. Everything was well loved, however none of my non-riding buddies believes the bike it isn't that old.

    Base 2008 Rockhopper Frame
    Fork - RS Tora 318 Air
    Headset - Cane Creek S3
    Wheelset - Ryno Lites with XT Hubs
    Brakes - Hayes Stroker Trail 185 Front 160 Rear
    1x9 Setup, SLX Shifter, Mid-cage XT derailleur
    34T SS chainring, ground the teeth off of the big ring to make a bashguard
    N-gear jumpstop.
    2.1 Weirwolf tires.
    Bar cut to personal preference
    100mm stem


    Yes, I could have bought a different bike. However, I like the ride, I only replaced components as I broke them. I also hunted deals from gearswaps and the swapped / old parts bins at the LBS.

    Quote Originally Posted by EnglishT
    ... when it gets to the point that you're upgrading expensive parts (like wheelset, brakes, fork) you're better off getting a better frame or a whole bike with the quality of parts that you want...
    Wheelsets and brakes are places where bike companies stash crappy components. You might get a decent fork and rear derailleur only to have worthless rims and brakes. The stock wheels on my rockhopper were the first to go. I admit to riding the bike more miles and harder than the typical low-midrange bike owner, but the stock wheels didn't last 3 mos of small drops and jumps, roots, and stair gaps.

  7. #7
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    This 2007 Fuel EX 5 posted in the Trek forum has everything except the rear shock upgraded.

    Last edited by sponger; 11-22-2009 at 01:59 PM.

  8. #8
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    Yes, I have. Including the frame. My old Cannondale "Uber-V" Super V started life as a giant Yukon. By the time it cracked there were no original parts left.

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    My first "real" mountain bike is not exactly cheap: it is a custom, built on one of the greatest hardtail frames ever, Banshee Scirocco. Wonderful strong frame with budget parts.

    The frame is a keeper but the only original parts now are: Cane Creek S-2 headset, Marzocchi 105 Comp Air fork, and the seat post quick release.

    changes, in order:
    - clipless pedals
    - wider bar and bolt on grips
    - singlespeed drivetrain
    - new tires
    - shorter stem
    - new seat
    - set back seat post to get the new seat where I want it
    - new wheels and disc brakes
    - new tires
    - new BB

    I've had several chains on that bike: change when needed.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnglishT
    Meaning no offense by this...
    I would say anyone that upgrades everything (except the frame) on an entry level bike is a fool.

    The frames on entry level bikes tend to be OK for entry level bikes, but they're not really good enough to warrent totally upgrading.
    Some are OK (and upgrading a few parts that break is obviously no biggie) but when it gets to the point that you're upgrading expensive parts (like wheelset, brakes, fork) you're better off getting a better frame or a whole bike with the quality of parts that you want.

    The frame is one of the most important parts of your bike - to upgrade everything else and neglect to upgrade the frame just seems ludicrous to me.
    That's a little harsh but wouldn't you agree that instead of waiting until I could afford an expensive bike, it's more fun and useful to upgrade components with the intention of swapping them out to a better frame down the road?

    I started off after over 10 years of no bike. I didn't know if I would get back into it or not which is why I went entry level plus I wanted to ride "now" and not have to save up for a couple months.

    This way I learned what components I like, what I don't like, and since everything is now different I got to experience the changes first hand.

    So far:

    Truative crankset
    Mavic rims
    WTB tires
    Shimano 9sp cassette
    203/185 BB7s
    Carbon handlebar and seatpost
    XT rear deraieller
    Revelation fork
    Sram 9sp chain
    Deore shifters
    SP7 levers

    Plus a computer and MiNewt 400 lights.

    Seems like there's more but I'm half asleep this morning.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  11. #11
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    Makes sense to me...

    I've got an '08 HRXC also and have made upgrades and have more planned. In my opinion, complete brand name bikes don't offer a lot of value anyway, whether they were from the low or high end of the manufacturer's selection. You can buy an $1800 bike and still find a lot of crummy parts. I think the HRXC is a very decent frame. Half the fun is upgrading. Beware of bike snobs.

  12. #12
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    I started out with a less than entry level bike. Thats right. the Holy Grail of crap. A Wal-Mart Mongoose. This was years ago when I was a poor college kid and didn't know any better. Anyways, I got serious about a year ago with abuse... er... riding my bike and started to break that goose on a very regular basis... Well the only thing that's origional now is the frame, handle bars and brakes. The man in the big brown truck is dropping off a new frame today, so Ill be down to handle bars and brakes, which will also be gone just as soon as I can decide which set of disks I want.

    Did I spend a lot more than if I had just gone and bought a new bike? Sure I probably did. even with all of the scrounging and buying used stuff, and thats not counting the special bike tools I had to buy.

    It was completely worth it though. I know how to swap cassettes, forks, the difference between head sets, seats, freewheels, freehubs.. blah blah.. I can take a bike apart down to the component level and put it all back together.


    Plus going this route you really get an appreciation for quality parts, because you get to see how much difference each part makes. When I put on my new deraileur I was amazed as how much smoother the bike shifted just because of that one component. When I put my new wheelset on I was again amazed at how much nicer and smoother the bike rolled. If I just bought a new bike laden with awesome parts I would only know that it rode great, but not exactly why.

    I don't think there is a thing wrong with going this route even though so many people will roll their eyes and puff up and proclaim that you would be soo much better off just buying new and blah blah blah... These folks always site the money issue, but for people like me it's more about the journey and making a bike uniquely yours.

    I plan to keep going this route with my bike.. My bike isn't just one machine, but an entity.. An ever evolving piece of kenetic mechanical art.

  13. #13
    SoCal Rider
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    Smile Upgraded (almost) Everything!

    Yup upgraded everything, aside from Grips & Brakes (which will both be coming in as an Xmas gift lol!)

    went from this:


    to this:


    to this:


    A lot of the things that get upgraded get sold on eBay, helping to fund for the new parts

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuickGN
    I'm wondering if anyone else has ever done this. I just converted my Specialized hrxc to a 9 speed setup from 7 and realized the only thing and I truly mean the only item that's stock besides the frame is the front derailleur which will likely be a birthday or Christmas present.

    Anyone else go this route instead of just buying a new bike?

    Yup, I have upgraded everything on an 2005 Element 30, the only original parts are the seatstay, and the suspension links....everything else including the frame as worn out, broken, been ****ed up, and/or upgraded to lighter parts.

    If I had bought a higher grade bike, most of it would have been replaced because of wear or breakage anyway...

    Works for me, Started with an $1800 bike probably worth $6000 new right now.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Detri Mental
    I started out with a less than entry level bike. Thats right. the Holy Grail of crap. A Wal-Mart Mongoose...It was completely worth it though. I know how to swap cassettes, forks, the difference between head sets, seats, freewheels, freehubs.. blah blah.. I can take a bike apart down to the component level and put it all back together.
    Plus, you now know crappy components when you see them!

    I kid, because I too got my start on a Walgoose. It builds character and got my legs in great shape ('cause it's so inefficient). Never took it offroad though.
    Now go home and get your ******* shinebox.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott

    Works for me, Started with an $1800 bike probably worth $6000 new right now.
    $1800 is not quite an entry level bike.

    It would be like me upgrading everything on my Cannondale Rush 4. Which people do quite often. A set of nice wheels ($900) and some X-0 drivetrain components would easily double the initial cost but would be within the realm of reasonableness.

    Take my sister's Giant Boulder SE. Now that is an entry level bike.

    I don't think I'd be plunking down hundreds of dollars on that bike.

    Now, if I rode the spit out of it all the time and wore something out or broke something, then I would have to think long and hard on whether to just buy a used replacement component to keep riding. Because if I start to think about upgrades, a used nicer bike probably is the same incremental cost but a better overall bike.
    Just get out and ride!

  17. #17
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    I did it too... started with a trek 4300 disc and did everything.

    RS tora 318
    Race Face Evolve XC crank and BB
    XT front and rear der
    Mavic Crossrides
    bb7s
    Sette carbon post and bar
    Sram attack shifters

    My tastes have shifted a little and I guess I feel a little embarrassment over all the expenditure on a $500 bike, it is true bike snob fodder, but I must echo the sentiment of those before me that noted the benefits, I am a heck of a lot better at working on a bike now and I have a really solid commuter now that I replaced that ride. If nothing else I spent a grand or a grand and a half learning to turn wrenches on my bike.

  18. #18
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    My 2005 Cannondale F2000SL was 25 pounds stock. After upgrading everything except the frame and fork...I wound-up with a 19 pound XC climbing animal. Excuse me...no, this bike is a ROCKET. Just to see how well it could do in competition- I lent it to a racer friend of mine and he took it to two First Place podiums in five starts:





    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 11-21-2009 at 11:37 AM.
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  19. #19
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    As long as your new components will go on a new frame, why the hell not?
    I still don't know enough about bike fitment or ride often enough to really appreciate or properly choose a new frame, but I've replaced:
    Pedals
    Rear derailluer (twice)
    Chain
    Cassette
    Wheels
    Shifters and cables
    Computer (twice)

    All on a crappy old rigid Trek.
    In my defense, everything I replaced I had broken on the trails :-)
    Hopefully I'll survive breaking the AL frame.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuickGN
    I'm wondering if anyone else has ever done this. I just converted my Specialized hrxc to a 9 speed setup from 7 and realized the only thing and I truly mean the only item that's stock besides the frame is the front derailleur which will likely be a birthday or Christmas present.

    Anyone else go this route instead of just buying a new bike?
    "You can get better, but you won't pay more."

  21. #21
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    My friend has upgraded his Walmart bike... I mean, $200 fork here, $150 crankset, etc....

    He loves it. I say no harm in doing 'anything' as long as you're happy, right? :-)

    I'll be probably upgrading my 2010 Trek 4300 as parts need changing, or just to upgrade... undecided yet. At this pace, the first thing will need changing will be the shifters because everytime I've eaten it, the poor things take the brunt of the impact.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by OSOK
    My friend has upgraded his Walmart bike... I mean, $200 fork here, $150 crankset, etc....

    He loves it. I say no harm in doing 'anything' as long as you're happy, right? :-)

    I'll be probably upgrading my 2010 Trek 4300 as parts need changing, or just to upgrade... undecided yet. At this pace, the first thing will need changing will be the shifters because everytime I've eaten it, the poor things take the brunt of the impact.

    Not quite...
    "Harm" was a very unfortunate choice of word for discussing a walmart bike being ridden off-road.
    Those things are seriously dangerous - they even come with a sticker warning you NOT to ride them offroad.
    Quite aside from which, their suspension is terrible, they're ridiculously heavy - a polished turd might be shiny, but is ultimately still a POS


    Ploughing serious money into any real entrylevel bike (ie: about $600 and under) is truly a waste of time.
    Certain, relatively cheap, upgrades can make a huge difference and be transferred to other bikes after (tires, grips, saddle, pedals) but when you come to getting new wheelsets and forks for your beginner bike you're really just spending money that you'd be much better advised to start saving for a better bike with.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by preludedriven
    A lot of the things that get upgraded get sold on eBay, helping to fund for the new parts
    Its amazing how much new bikers will pay for your old parts, on eBay. Guess we all gotta start somewhere!
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  24. #24
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    I have a 09 HR and like you I have upgraded the drive train to 9 speed but I did it on the cheap by obtaining quality older used parts on ebay and finding good deals on line. The bike rides great now but I believe I have reached the point of diminishing returns. Only wear parts from here on in!

  25. #25
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    if it makes you feel good and riding every week...then why not.

    good for you...i just hope your bike is getting miles with all those fancy new parts!


    Quote Originally Posted by BuickGN
    That's a little harsh but wouldn't you agree that instead of waiting until I could afford an expensive bike, it's more fun and useful to upgrade components with the intention of swapping them out to a better frame down the road?

    I started off after over 10 years of no bike. I didn't know if I would get back into it or not which is why I went entry level plus I wanted to ride "now" and not have to save up for a couple months.

    This way I learned what components I like, what I don't like, and since everything is now different I got to experience the changes first hand.

    So far:

    Truative crankset
    Mavic rims
    WTB tires
    Shimano 9sp cassette
    203/185 BB7s
    Carbon handlebar and seatpost
    XT rear deraieller
    Revelation fork
    Sram 9sp chain
    Deore shifters
    SP7 levers

    Plus a computer and MiNewt 400 lights.

    Seems like there's more but I'm half asleep this morning.
    I just like riding my mountain bike.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigSharks
    Plus, you now know crappy components when you see them!

    I kid, because I too got my start on a Walgoose. It builds character and got my legs in great shape ('cause it's so inefficient). Never took it offroad though.

    Man that is so true. I didn't know what an energy sapper I was riding until I started putting good parts on it.

    And the stock components on those bikes really are crap. Plus im fat so nothing with a bearing lasted long on that sucker.

    God Im so happy my new frame is here. I can't wait to dump that old frame tomorrow on top of my scrap metal pile.

    But yeah... Crappy bikes can be a good jumping off point to start swapping good components on to.

    I was amazed at how good of a job the bicycle industry has done with standardization.
    You can use a lesser bike as a placeholder for good parts and swap everything over once you get a good frame. Bravo!

  27. #27
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    i did, only thing original on my rockhopper is the brakes (BB5s, and i'm happy with them)

  28. #28
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    Yes, but not on my bike!!

    I worked at a shop and a customer had a Mongoose full suspension bike. Not quite as bad as the very cheapest(ie Magna) POS full suspension bikes, but close. One notch above.

    Cranks were bad so I changed out the BB and crankset. Then he wanted new shifters and derailleur. Then a new bar, and stem. Then new wheels. Then new fork. Seat, grips, etc,etc.

    I kept telling him he should think about saving up for a new bike, and not put that much into that frame before he passed the point of no return, but he insisted he wanted to go that route. And so it went until nothing but the frame and shock was original. Nothing!!

    I knew he would not get squat out of selling it to get a new bike though.

    Finally I managed to find him a great deal on a slightly used, but much better Specialized FSR frame and was able to get everything swapped over with just a few changes.(seatpost and front der) Luckily his bike at least had a standard size headtube, and not a 1" like a lot of POS bikes. That was the saving grace to the whole thing.

    So piece by piece, he did get an entirely different bike.

  29. #29
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    omg..ok, I'll stop..

    Well, I think I feel a bit foolish now,
    But I didn't know there were rules to owning an entry level bike.. So how does it go again?.. It's ok to buy a bike with an actual cash value of "x" amount of dollars* but don't upgade.. unless the value of the frame is equal to or greater than the forks times (.5) the derailleur gears unless of course the wheelset is more than the forks and brakes combined...but less than the frame... if so then you should just save your money and get a better bike..

    * ("x" being the unknown, and as we all know.. always find the solution for "x")

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atari
    Well, I think I feel a bit foolish now,
    But I didn't know there were rules to owning an entry level bike.. So how does it go again?.. It's ok to buy a bike with an actual cash value of "x" amount of dollars* but don't upgade.. unless the value of the frame is equal to or greater than the forks times (.5) the derailleur gears unless of course the wheelset is more than the forks and brakes combined...but less than the frame... if so then you should just save your money and get a better bike..

    * ("x" being the unknown, and as we all know.. always find the solution for "x")
    Not that there is a "right or wrong" to it.

    But you can get a bike built up for way less than buying everything separately.

  31. #31
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    the frame makes the bike, the components are just a long for the ride. you feel the frame and suspension 100% of the time. you might be shifting gears and using little flashy parts 1% of the ride.

    forks transfer over, its reasonable to get a good one (you can spend a ton on a bike and still get a mediocre fork).. same with tires, not having traction sucks.. but once you start looking at a few hundred bucks for some nice wheels on a junky frame, its time to get a good frame instead.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcaronongan
    if it makes you feel good and riding every week...then why not.

    good for you...i just hope your bike is getting miles with all those fancy new parts!

    Oh yes. The more I do to it the more obsessed I become.

    I've sort of waited on the frame swap because of the sentimental value. It's my first "real" mountain bike and me and the GF bought ours together. Lame I know.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot
    the frame makes the bike, the components are just a long for the ride. you feel the frame and suspension 100% of the time. you might be shifting gears and using little flashy parts 1% of the ride.

    forks transfer over, its reasonable to get a good one (you can spend a ton on a bike and still get a mediocre fork).. same with tires, not having traction sucks.. but once you start looking at a few hundred bucks for some nice wheels on a junky frame, its time to get a good frame instead.
    I think it's just the opposite. Bad components on a good frame will make the bike feel worse than an average frame and good components. My friend has a Specialized Epic and for the most part my component set is better. Other than the obvious difference, mine feels every bit as good.

    I use my upgraded crankset, cassette, and chain more than 1% of the time. Same with the brakes, tires, rims, fork, and light weight seatpost and handlebar.

    As long as the entry level frame is fairly light and strong I would go with the top notch components over a great frame if I could only choose one. Luckily I don't have to just choose one.

    I've looked at what bikes start at that offer the components I have and I'm actually saving money doing it this way.

    I didn't want to start a component vs frame war but it seems the "frame guys" are very opinionated.
    '08 Hardrock HRXC
    '09 Epic Comp
    '14 Trance SX -

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    Not that there is a "right or wrong" to it.

    But you can get a bike built up for way less than buying everything separately.
    My comment being tongue in cheek of course.
    But you're probably right "generally"... but you may not get the exact componets you really want. However, I guess you could have your LBS just switch out whatever componets at the time of purchase... but that's still just upgrading.

  35. #35
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    I don't have this bike anymore but went through the same upgrade process of changing EVERYTHING except the frame. I would still have this bike if I didn't start riding a single speed hardtail.

    2007 FSRXC


    Upgraded

  36. #36
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    I sort of upgrade my entry level XC bike (GF Wahoo) by transferring parts from my mid level AM bike (Pitch Pro) whenever I upgrade it. I see it as win win; I can upgrade my to better parts on the AM bike without worrying about selling the parts and I get two better bikes after the whole transfer. I keep the the parts from the XC bike as they are worth more as spares rather than sold for little money.

    Solely upgrading my entry level XC bike doesn't make sense as it's meant to be a backup/beater bike. The only new parts it sees are wear items.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooper58
    I don't have this bike anymore but went through the same upgrade process of changing EVERYTHING except the frame. I would still have this bike if I didn't start riding a single speed hardtail.
    What? You traded that cool, upgraded FSR for a spinner??? You're insane!
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  38. #38
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    to the OP, i don't find anything wrong with upgrading parts on what some consider a "crappy" entry level bike......its fun, you end up learning good bike maintenance skills, and you've built a bike that you like riding....do what you like despite the fact that it may cost more in the end.....getting there is half the fun right?

    here is mine that i have upgraded:



    its a walmart schwinn, and I love the bike. The frame works for me, its on the small size, but I hail from BMX and I like smaller frames. IT came fairly well spec'd from the store: wtb velociraptors, altus running gear (running fine for me), and a decent wheel set which hasn't gone out of true any more than any other wheelsets Ive had (i do my own truing). I have changed some parts tho, like the forks and rear shock (largely b/c its suspended for kids), headset (sealed), and the bars (went wider), brake bridges.....but all else has been holding up well.....and despite what some detractors say, i do ride this bike on challenging trails....and despite any warning labels not to take it offroad.


    i beg to differ with those who come down on walgoose bikes (or any other "low end" bike).....there is no such thing as a crappy bike, but there is a bike that is not fit for an intended purpose....

    for all modern bikes, so long as its assembled properly, and properly maintained, it will roll when you peddle and will turn when you push the handlebars....what more can you ask of the bike?

    that said, the next question is will the bike work for what you want it to do? i have no delusion of taking my schwinn down whistler, but it does work for the trails that I do run.....if youre reasonably intelligent at picking the correct bike (which may include wallyworld bikes) for your skill level or intended use....then there is no such thing as a crappy bike....only a crappy decision. be smart and know the limits of the bike before you jump to a conclusion that "its crap.

  39. #39
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwc1
    to the OP, i don't find anything wrong with upgrading parts on what some consider a "crappy" entry level bike......its fun, you end up learning good bike maintenance skills, and you've built a bike that you like riding....do what you like despite the fact that it may cost more in the end.....getting there is half the fun right?

    here is mine that i have upgraded:

    its a walmart schwinn, and I love the bike. The frame works for me, its on the small size, but I hail from BMX and I like smaller frames. IT came fairly well spec'd from the store: wtb velociraptors, altus running gear (running fine for me), and a decent wheel set which hasn't gone out of true any more than any other wheelsets Ive had (i do my own truing). I have changed some parts tho, like the forks and rear shock (largely b/c its suspended for kids), headset (sealed), and the bars (went wider), brake bridges.....but all else has been holding up well.....and despite what some detractors say, i do ride this bike on challenging trails....and despite any warning labels not to take it offroad.


    i beg to differ with those who come down on walgoose bikes (or any other "low end" bike).....there is no such thing as a crappy bike, but there is a bike that is not fit for an intended purpose....

    for all modern bikes, so long as its assembled properly, and properly maintained, it will roll when you peddle and will turn when you push the handlebars....what more can you ask of the bike?

    that said, the next question is will the bike work for what you want it to do? i have no delusion of taking my schwinn down whistler, but it does work for the trails that I do run.....if youre reasonably intelligent at picking the correct bike (which may include wallyworld bikes) for your skill level or intended use....then there is no such thing as a crappy bike....only a crappy decision. be smart and know the limits of the bike before you jump to a conclusion that "its crap.
    What is that unnecessary red anodized piece next to your front V brake? Is that to clear thorns?
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  40. #40
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    Omg, I better go run and take it before my next ride before someone sees it?!

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah
    What is that unnecessary red anodized piece next to your front V brake? Is that to clear thorns?
    I was thinking the same thing. I haven't seen "Brake Boosters" since the late 80's and early 90's. I think I had one on my 1989 Nishiki Alien.

  42. #42
    Bushwacker
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    Quote Originally Posted by mwc1
    Omg, I better go run and take it before my next ride before someone sees it?!
    Good one!

    Look, what the bike snobs don't get is some people just like to upgrade the bike they have to see how much they can improve it from stock. Bike mod decisions are not based on a cost anlysis/caluclator basis for everyone. Sentiment, individuality etc is imprortant to some and what the hell is wrong with that? Whatever floats someone,s boat is ALL that matters, Any other kind of attitude is non-inclusive, ego driven, bull sh#t.

    Mod away my friends.
    When I'm not windsurfing, I'm mountain biking

  43. #43
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    its a brake booster, it adds stiffness to the brake posts. and they do work to a degree

  44. #44
    I Tried Them ALL... SuperModerator
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    I was being sarcastic. A brake booster is not necessary when the fork already has the stanchion arch at the rear. Sorry for being a weight weenie...
    "This is a male-dominated forum... there will be lots of Testosterone sword-shaming here" ~ Kenfucius

  45. #45
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    Here's an idea, check the sarcastic, weight weenie attitude at the door on the begginer thread. The whole rest of the forum is infested with it, why bring it here?
    When I'm not windsurfing, I'm mountain biking

  46. #46
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    To the OP- I did. I started on an '05 Giant Yukon- and slowly upgraded it into a useful all mountain bike. In the end, it had a new frame and 95% new parts. The only bit left was the saddle. Then it cracked, and I bought my [used] Coiler.

    But anyways It's a great project if you start with a decent bike. That's how I learned alot about working on bikes, and what exactly I want for a bike. Now I've got a coiler and a karate monkey as my off road bikes.

    Before: (wrong color scheme)


    During:


    After: (missing parts, was on the final disassembly after it cracked).


    And now:

  47. #47
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    I've just ordered a Trance X2 and am going to upgrade my 08 Rincon into a commuter with a carbon fork and change it to a 9 speed setup, maybe even put on hydraulic brakes (or put the Elixir 5's off the trance onto it after 6-12 months). If parts break on the trance i can then swap them over if i need to, plus i get to get my mechanic skills up on a non-essential bike.

    I'm also really happy with the feeling on the Rincon, especially when used as a commuter. It rides nicely and i'm too attached to the bike just to throw it away or sell it

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah
    I was being sarcastic. A brake booster is not necessary when the fork already has the stanchion arch at the rear. Sorry for being a weight weenie...
    Weenie is right =)

    I ride an old 1999 Cannondale F4000 and get the 'looks' from the bike snobs with the $5000+ set ups every weekend. I think the the important thing is not about what you ride, but RIDING!

    And, to quote the wise words of Al, my old timer bike guru friend, "An expensive set up doesn't necessarily make you a better rider", but it sure can make one LOOK like a better rider.

    I applaud all the riders who come out to ride with their "low end", Wallyworld(or whatever) bikes!!

    No disrespect intended...just my opinion.
    Chickengurl
    "I got more time than money"

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