Another Bikes Direct Question- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Another Bikes Direct Question

    After my accident a couple of weeks ago my husband really wants me to dump the Mamba and get another bike, preferably a 26er. The Mamba has the same brakes as my other bikes so I'm not sure what he's upset about other than I scared the crap out of him. He says it's a death trap after he rode it to look for my cell phone and glasses and the brakes wouldn't work for him either.

    I know what's at my LBS and nothing interests me or has decent components, Trek or Specialized. 26ers seem to be dying out. I was looking at Bikes Direct and wondered if their bikes were decent and was kind of confused at how they labeled the bikes for their usage. Kind of looking at "Best/Pro level" Still learning the different component levels/shocks and wanted to stay within 1000-1500. Anything you can recommend?

    The other concern is sizing/fit. Since you can't ride it until it gets here, I feel like it's a risk.

    I'd also have to have my LBS put it together and then have to face "Why didn't you buy a bike from us?" It's not the LBS fault about the bikes, he's selling the ones Trek and Specialized make.

    Other option is to wait until the 2013 bikes come out. I'm not against a 29er either.

    Not in a big rush to buy a bike. My brain is still warped from the crash. I'll do some more research on components in the morning.

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    if a 26 is going to be easier to control than a 29, that is still and issue you need to address. I still think it has nothing to do with wheel size, unless they sold you a frame size that is too big.

    however, it sounds like the brakes are the real issue. the brakes SHOULD work perfectly without fail. you need to get the shop that sold you that bike to address that. if they can't make it work, they can get Trek to replace the brakes with something that works better. they can, because I have seen it happen.

    i still think you are spooked because you pushed yourself beyond your technical limits and got hurt. you need to get those brakes working, double check your bike fit settings, and slow down.

    here's what i posted in another thread about BD a moment ago:
    you get a good value in the short term from BD. I think they generally put very nice components and skimp and the frame quality for the price. if you are a fairly good bike mechanic and you have your own tools to do basic assembly and adjustments, it should be a good deal. a BD bike might also give you incentive to learn to do these things on your own. it is common for a bike shop to charge $100-150 for assembly, so include that in the overall cost of the bike. if a tune-up costs $75 and the LBS does that kind of service for "free" with the purchase of the bike, include an additional $150 or more in "free" labor you are giving up with the cost of the BD bike.

    however, most bike shops include expert assembly and offer some sort of extended extended service with the purchase of the bike. most bike shops will do adjustments like brakes, bearings, derailleurs, wheels, etc for the life of the bike. they will also handle any warranty issues you have without much hassle.

    if you buy from BD, you're on your own paying extra for assembly and maintenance and handling warranties will be a little more hassle. this all assumes your are comparing BD to a decent LBS, which not all of them are.

  3. #3
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    I don't have the luxury of being able to check out the Mamba you have, but I have to agree with Mack Turtle above here. It is possible that some things are not in great shape on the Mamba, but it is likely that your skill level had more to do with your crash than anything else. At the very least, if you were more experienced, you would have known the bike was not performing correctly and may have compensated by riding more within the capability of what the bike could do at that time.

    Still, I can see how you just may not trust the bike and would prefer a fresh start. If you have the means to afford that, then that is certainly your prerogerative.

    If you can swing $1K to $1.5K, then you can get a pretty decent hardtail, especially if you are looking at some of the mail order options, although MT mentioned some of the additional expense those can incur if you are not mechanically adept and would need to have final adjustments performed by a shop. Also, you don't have the luxury of sitting, or riding, before you buy to make sure at the very least that the size is right for you. Compare ETT (effective top tube) lengths to bikes that are known to fit you for a good place to start, but there are other geometry factors to consider, especially if any of your body proportions are somewhat . . . . odd (very short/long legs, arms, torso).

    If you are tall enough to fit on a frame that is an 18" or larger (they are sold out of the 16" IIRC), the Airborne Goblin (a 29er) is an excellent value at $1149.

    From Bikes Direct, there are several between $1K and $1.5K that have nice components and a good enough frame. However, currently, many of the bikes in sizes likely to fit you (14", 16", and 18") are sold out until the next model year bikes are released (for BD, that is usually around November).
    Last edited by jeffj; 05-14-2012 at 06:26 AM.

  4. #4
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    I agree with the others. I think the bike has a lot less to do with the crash than your hubby wants to believe. Crashes happen. That's part of mountain biking. Of course brakes are extremely important so the very first thing you need to do is get that addressed. Once that issue is taken care of, ride the bike and re-access the need to buy a new bike. After that, if you (or he) still feel the bike is unsafe for whatever reason, then I'd start looking at a new bike.
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  5. #5
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    Have you taken the bike back the shop and explained what happened? Have the mechanics look at the brakes and make sure they are working correctly before doing anything else. I also agree with those above that wheelsize should have little to do with control; unless you are VERY short (under 5' tall) there shouldn't be a big difference. Specialized makes the "Myra" which is a female-specific 29er HT that should fit shorter women riders. Wrecks do happen, its part of mountain biking. As to BD bikes, I have stated in other posts that the bikes provide a good value, however, you need to factor in the cost of your time to put it together (right or wrong) or the cost of taking it to a shop to have it assembled. If a shop gives you crap about it, take you $50-75 somewhere else. What specifically happend that you point towards the brakes?
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  6. #6
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    I do believe you may be able to maneuver a 26 inch bike easier than a 29er. That is just my opinion, but I agree with the others that I do not believe the bike needs to be replaced after your crash. Even if it was the brakes you could get your currents brakes fixed (new pads or bled) or pick up some new brakes for less than 1,000 dollars.

    If you're mentally scared of that bike and want a different bike then that's understandable. In that case I say buy you a 26 inch bike. They are not as popular as they once were with the different wheel sizes, but they are not going anywhere anytime soon.

    With your budget and an assembly cost I recommend this bike, but it is currently sold out. XT level components are fantastic. They're very durable, light, and cost effective. I use these myself. My 2005 XT shifter and derailleurs are still going strong and shifting great. They were used on my main bike until last year. There is one bike that has a couple of lighter parts, but it is closer to 1,500. With an assembly charge it may be a little over your budget. These bikes are very light being 22 and 21 pounds. Shimano DynaSys 3x10 30 Speed, Mountain Bikes - MTB - 2011 Motobecane Fly Pro
    Last edited by Rod; 05-14-2012 at 11:53 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by "Rod" View Post
    I do believe you may be able to maneuver a 26 inch bike easier than a 29er. That is just my opinion,
    IMO, there's a trade off. I agree that at least in my experience, a 26" bike is easier to handle and maneuver however I found that my 29er is more stable. Doesn't feel as squirrelly in the rough stuff. So the choice in wheel size I feel is largely dependent on ride style. I guess what I'm saying in short is I agree...lol
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  8. #8
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    do you really need a new bike? i would hate for you to spend money, time, and effort on something that isn't going to improve your experience. for sure spending up to 1500 is going to get you a better bike than the mamba but the mamba isn't a horrible bike.

    as others have said, the brakes (regardless of entry level or not) should work really well.

    i faintly remember your original thread about the accident and the brakes weren't working pretty much at all. if that was the issue have your lbs fix the brakes.

    bikes direct are okay bikes but they are not as good of deals as some people think. some have a decent drivetrain and fork but then the wheelset is crap.

    good luck!
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  9. #9
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    Tell your husband to stfu and ride his own bike. You're not going to get back to riding with a clear mind if he won't shut his yap.

    If you've had the bike checked over and it has a clean bill of health then go for a ride. The cause of your last crash was pure pilot error so changing bikes won't do you a bit of good. You'll crash a 650 or 26" in the same spot if you carry that much speed again.
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  10. #10
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    Having read your other accounts of your issues I'm going to say you might as well give a new bike a try, though if you can, keep your current one at least until you find out if the smaller wheels make you more comfortable.

    I would never buy a bike off of BD.com when you feel like you are having issues with bike handling. For the most knowledgeable people, BD is still a crapshoot. Yeah they have geometry tables, but unless you are absolutely sure what a half degree here and a quarter inch there means when the bike hits the dirt then reading numbers on a website is pointless.

    When you're able, test ride as many 26" bikes as you can get your hands on. That way you'll have an idea of what the difference might be. I can say that if you can find a Giant dealer that you should be giving the Trance X4 a test ride as it is probably the only worthwhile full suspension bike in your price range and in my experience that can help people who have had control issues in the past.

    The three people I ride most with are my wife and our two friends (both ladies) and have seen the difference a full suspension bike can make to riding confidence several times over. First, I got my wife a full suspension bike (120mm travel) with a dropper seatpost and she has gone from being apprenhesive when coming to a switchback to slaying our local trails and hitting the bike parks a couple times. Same deal with both our friends, one bought a FS and has really changed her riding and the other demoed a FS with us one day and she was a completely different rider (from very timid to keeping right up with us).

    Bottom line is that you can't pick a bike without trying it because your confidence is the issue, not what parts are attached to the bike. The fact that a BD bike comes with a more expensive rear derailleur is not going to help you when you hit that steep hill the next time. If you need to, drive farther to find more bikes to test ride. In the end when you find your perfect bike, you'll be glad you put the time in to find it.

    Oh, and 26" isn't dead. So don't worry about that.
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  11. #11
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    Going to pick my bike up today and find out about the brakes. I take full responsibility for my my crash. It happens and that day happened to have my number on it. I'm inexperienced and still learning. I rode the bike the week before w/o problems. Brakes worked and did fine on steeper hills and over some harder stuff.

    You confirmed what I suspected about Bikes Direct. Some parts of the bikes aren't as great as they "appear" to be. I wondered why the cheap prices. They aren't "cheap" bikes, just not what I'm looking for.

    My LBS gives free maintenance for a year, is awesome at answering questions and I'd rather give to a local store. I can get the bike fit to my needs. If I bought a bike from somewhere else, I wouldn't have the maintenance help. That cost adds up over time.

    Not dumping the bike yet. I'd like to take her out another time and go from there. I just wish the trail was marked better between easy, advanced and the direction the trails go.

    If I dump any money in a bike, it will be in the tires and a new crankset for my son's bike. He's stripped the left pedal. He's not abusive on bikes, just hard on them. He's put a lot of miles on that bike last year. It's a really nice bike..lightweight and fun to ride. Just way to big for me at a size 21. Something like that.

  12. #12
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    sounds like pad contamination, or maybe air in the lines. Your shop should be able to adress this.
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  13. #13
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    There is something wrong with the bike's brakes.

    I took it out and same thing even on concrete. Hit about 10 mph, hit the right brake and I slide down the road..not skidding..a smooth sliding/gliding like you would on ice. Went a little faster, still doing this power slide. Holding down the brakes at full force does absolutely nothing. If you need a video like the guy whose skewer was missing, happy to oblige.

    LBS said he checked the brakes but obviously didn't ride it.

    Anything I can check to look for? If it's the pads, how do I get them out to look them over?

    Something need cleaned?

    Cable too long?

    LBS is backed up for weeks. I'm sure every store is given it's summer. I could go on the regional list for Omaha and see if someone is willing to check it out. No one rides down here or has mechanical experience.

    It's nice to know I'm not totally crazy.

    Front brake works just fine.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    IMO, there's a trade off. I agree that at least in my experience, a 26" bike is easier to handle and maneuver however I found that my 29er is more stable. Doesn't feel as squirrelly in the rough stuff. So the choice in wheel size I feel is largely dependent on ride style. I guess what I'm saying in short is I agree...lol
    And I agree with you as well. I currently ride a 29er and it does roll over stuff easier and this makes the terrain feel less harsh. It does feel more stable on the downhills. I stand and pedal on my 29er where I don't feel comfortable on my 26 inch bike.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post
    There is something wrong with the bike's brakes.

    I took it out and same thing even on concrete. Hit about 10 mph, hit the right brake and I slide down the road..not skidding..a smooth sliding/gliding like you would on ice. Went a little faster, still doing this power slide. Holding down the brakes at full force does absolutely nothing. If you need a video like the guy whose skewer was missing, happy to oblige.

    LBS said he checked the brakes but obviously didn't ride it.

    Anything I can check to look for? If it's the pads, how do I get them out to look them over?

    Something need cleaned?

    Cable too long?

    LBS is backed up for weeks. I'm sure every store is given it's summer. I could go on the regional list for Omaha and see if someone is willing to check it out. No one rides down here or has mechanical experience.

    It's nice to know I'm not totally crazy.

    Front brake works just fine.
    I don't know what brakes you have, but Trek's website shows the current Mamba has Shimano Hydraulic brakes on it. If I were to guess, I would say that your rotor and pads are contaminated. You can fuss with trying to burn off the pads if you want, but I've never found it to be that effective; search the brake forum for advice and instructions on how to do this.

    I would buy new brake pads and clean the hell out of your rotor and caliper using isopropyl alcohol. Use clean paper towels and not shop rags when you clean your rotor as shop rags can contain residual oils even out of the packaging.

    Also make sure your wheels are attached nice and tight and that your calipers are aligned with your rotor. When you squeeze your brake (hydraulic brakes only, mechanicals are different) the rotor should not flex side to side at all. The two brake pads should touch the rotor at exactly the same time. Even flexing the rotor a millimeter can cause power loss.

    One more piece of advice, make sure you're using your front brake as much as your back brake. It seems counter-intuitive but most of your braking power comes from the front brake (people seem to say around 75%, I'm not sure of an actual number) so if you aren't using it you get out of control much faster which leads to panic stopping, which in turn leads to crashing.
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  16. #16
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    I would get someone at the or another lbs to ride and check your rear brakes. The pads could have something on them which some sandpaper could fix or just be worn out. I would tell the mechanic what you said in the last post and have him hop on the bike.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I don't know what brakes you have, but Trek's website shows the current Mamba has Shimano Hydraulic brakes on it. If I were to guess, I would say that your rotor and pads are contaminated. You can fuss with trying to burn off the pads if you want, but I've never found it to be that effective; search the brake forum for advice and instructions on how to do this.

    I would buy new brake pads and clean the hell out of your rotor and caliper using isopropyl alcohol. Use clean paper towels and not shop rags when you clean your rotor as shop rags can contain residual oils even out of the packaging.

    Also make sure your wheels are attached nice and tight and that your calipers are aligned with your rotor. When you squeeze your brake (hydraulic brakes only, mechanicals are different) the rotor should not flex side to side at all. The two brake pads should touch the rotor at exactly the same time. Even flexing the rotor a millimeter can cause power loss.

    One more piece of advice, make sure you're using your front brake as much as your back brake. It seems counter-intuitive but most of your braking power comes from the front brake (people seem to say around 75%, I'm not sure of an actual number) so if you aren't using it you get out of control much faster which leads to panic stopping, which in turn leads to crashing.
    This is good advice if you want to do this yourself. I would uninstall the brake pads and see how worn down they are. If they're in good shape use some sandpaper and take off the surface. Next clean the rotor and if they're worn down or don't bite good after using sandpaper on them I would replace them. Make sure to clean the rotor though.

  18. #18
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    Got the brake pads out. They are a mess with grooves and pits. Dirt is everywhere. Will order a new set on Wednesday either for a spare or to replace and buy some sand paper. Hopefully I can just do it myself so I don't have to wait in line for 3 weeks. Is this normal for bike shops? If so, I'll just add tools as needed and learn to do more stuff myself. I know it takes time to fix bikes, I get that. However; I want out and riding a bike sooner than that.

    I have the 2011 Mamba..mechanical brakes.

    Thanks guys! I'll have her up and running soon.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post
    Got the brake pads out. They are a mess with grooves and pits. Dirt is everywhere. Will order a new set on Wednesday either for a spare or to replace and buy some sand paper. Hopefully I can just do it myself so I don't have to wait in line for 3 weeks. Is this normal for bike shops? If so, I'll just add tools as needed and learn to do more stuff myself. I know it takes time to fix bikes, I get that. However; I want out and riding a bike sooner than that.

    I have the 2011 Mamba..mechanical brakes.

    Thanks guys! I'll have her up and running soon.
    Grooves and pits are pretty normal, shiny hard surfaces and excessive dirt or oil aren't normal. Sandpaper is almost never needed for brake pad work because as soon as you put a few hard stops into them, they bed into the rotor which means all that hard sanding you've done is lost. Sanding is good if your pads are glazed, not if they're contaminated.

    You should be able to do any work on your brakes by yourself if you're a bit mechanically inclined, this process is mostly cleaning and aligning so there shouldn't be much in the way of real gritty mechanical stuff.

    3 weeks at this time of the year is not unheard of. Everyone else has come out of the woodwork and wants their bike to be ready for the season to get into full swing. Our shop would spend a couple months where our repairs would take 3+ weeks. Not great for the customers but there are only so many hands available to do a lot of work.

    If you have mechanical brakes, your process is a bit different. You want to center the gap in the caliper around the rotor. Then take the fixed pad (inner pad, toward the center of the hub) and adjust it so that it is as close as you can get to the rotor without rubbing excessively. Then adjust the moving pad such that you get the proper lever feel (enough pull that you don't hit the grips but not so much that you don't have any modulation) by using cable tension. This video from Sram about the BB5 brakes should help: Avid_BB5_Setup - YouTube it's not the same brake but it has the same adjustments as your brake has (if I'm not mistaken about what brakes are on your bike) and takes the same concepts to set up properly.

    If your rotor bends a lot when you squeeze the brake then it is robbing power. If your rotor twists (when looking down onto the caliper) then you're loosing a lot of power. Because it is a fixed pad system, you will need to periodically adjust the fixed pad to keep it close to the rotor as the brake pads wear down.

    If you want to get back on the trail as soon as possible: bake the brake pads, clean the rotor and caliper with alcohol, and align the brake. You can even do this while you wait for the new pads to come in, just remember to clean the rotor any time you switch pads.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post
    Got the brake pads out. They are a mess with grooves and pits. Dirt is everywhere. Will order a new set on Wednesday either for a spare or to replace and buy some sand paper. Hopefully I can just do it myself so I don't have to wait in line for 3 weeks. Is this normal for bike shops? If so, I'll just add tools as needed and learn to do more stuff myself. I know it takes time to fix bikes, I get that. However; I want out and riding a bike sooner than that.

    I have the 2011 Mamba..mechanical brakes.

    Thanks guys! I'll have her up and running soon.
    Bike maintenance is pretty easy for the most part. There are several great books worth having because a picture is worth 1000 words. Youtube is a great resource and Park Tool's website is also a wealth of info for working on your bike. General maintenance can be done with just a few simple tools. Definitely worth learning to save money and in your case right now, time.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post
    There is something wrong with the bike's brakes.

    I took it out and same thing even on concrete. Hit about 10 mph, hit the right brake and I slide down the road..not skidding..a smooth sliding/gliding like you would on ice. Went a little faster, still doing this power slide. Holding down the brakes at full force does absolutely nothing. If you need a video like the guy whose skewer was missing, happy to oblige.

    LBS said he checked the brakes but obviously didn't ride it.

    Anything I can check to look for? If it's the pads, how do I get them out to look them over?

    Something need cleaned?

    Cable too long?

    LBS is backed up for weeks. I'm sure every store is given it's summer. I could go on the regional list for Omaha and see if someone is willing to check it out. No one rides down here or has mechanical experience.

    It's nice to know I'm not totally crazy.

    Front brake works just fine.
    Ok, please clarify what exactly is happening when you apply the rear brake. What is "sliding/grinding"? Are your brakes stopping or not? What brand and model brakes do you have? Are you saying that when you apply the brake it just doesn't grab and stop the bike? Finally, do you use a spray chain lube? It sounds like you got something on the pads or rotor and now they are contaminated if they just won't stop.
    Last edited by TiGeo; 05-14-2012 at 03:40 PM.
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  22. #22
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    Took out the pads, cleaned them with the isopropyl alcohol. They were pretty dirty. Cleaned the rotors. Put the pads back in (looked at the front disc brake to see if they were in right with the metal clip) and worked on the "burning in" process. Brakes are getting better but I don't think I did enough of the burning process after another Google/YouTube search.

    Brakes are SRAM BB5 disc brakes. When you apply the brakes, nothing happens. The tire keeps going. It slows down but no true stopping power. The brakes are working better now, but not perfect.

    My back is severely protesting at the moment so I'm done for the night.

    Will still order the pads..maybe two sets. Amazon Prime will send them w/o shipping and if I truly want them the next day will just add a few more dollars. I could call up to a few stores and see if they have them and are willing to ship them out saving me 30 dollars of gas for a drive.

    This is truly rewarding work though. No wonder you guys all like it. Next time will be much faster and will have more experience.

    LBS had his head mechanic leave a few weeks ago. He doesn't have anyone else at the moment so I know he's completely backed up. If my back wasn't so messed up, I'd ask to see if he'd be willing to teach me.

  23. #23
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    The Avid BB5's are easy to work on. Definitely sounds like a pad/adjustment issue. They are solid brakes so you should be able to get the dialed in. Check your cable for stretch or looseness, make sure the brakes are adjusted to the rotors, everything clean, ect. If you don't have them, new brake levers with adjustments help alot for quick dialing in. Avid Speed Dial 7's work great with the BB5 and BB7 brakes, and they are cheap.

    Avid Speed Dial 7 Levers > Components > Brakes > Brake Levers | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post
    Took out the pads, cleaned them with the isopropyl alcohol. They were pretty dirty. Cleaned the rotors. Put the pads back in (looked at the front disc brake to see if they were in right with the metal clip) and worked on the "burning in" process. Brakes are getting better but I don't think I did enough of the burning process after another Google/YouTube search.

    Brakes are SRAM BB5 disc brakes. When you apply the brakes, nothing happens. The tire keeps going. It slows down but no true stopping power. The brakes are working better now, but not perfect.

    My back is severely protesting at the moment so I'm done for the night.

    Will still order the pads..maybe two sets. Amazon Prime will send them w/o shipping and if I truly want them the next day will just add a few more dollars. I could call up to a few stores and see if they have them and are willing to ship them out saving me 30 dollars of gas for a drive.

    Ok, final question. Can you pull the lever all the way to the grip? There may be too much slack in the cable. Avid BB5s are easy to work on and there are plenty of how-tos here if you do a seach. Bascially, you need to start by setting the cable tension by pulling out all the slack at the brake caliper. Next, you need to align the caliper to the rotor by loosening

    This is truly rewarding work though. No wonder you guys all like it. Next time will be much faster and will have more experience.

    LBS had his head mechanic leave a few weeks ago. He doesn't have anyone else at the moment so I know he's completely backed up. If my back wasn't so messed up, I'd ask to see if he'd be willing to teach me.
    Ok, final question. Can you pull the lever all the way to the grip? There may be too much slack in the cable. Avid BB5s are easy to work on and there are plenty of how-tos here if you do a seach. Bascially, you need to start by setting the cable tension by pulling out all the slack at the brake caliper. Next, you need to align the caliper to the rotor by loosening the caliper bolts, squeezing the brake lever and while hold it squeezed, re-tightening the bolts. Other than that, they should stop...I have ridden a bike with those brakes so I know that they work...this is some sort of set-up issue.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  25. #25
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    Yeah, there really isn't much that can go wrong with them. You may need to tear them completely down if the above doesn't work and may sure the piston isn't sticking. Easy to do, there are videos on youtube. Give it a really good cleaning and you should be good to go.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    ...
    you get a good value in the short term from BD. I think they generally put very nice components and skimp and the frame quality for the price. if you are a fairly good bike mechanic and you have your own tools to do basic assembly and adjustments, it should be a good deal. a BD bike might also give you incentive to learn to do these things on your own.
    Just got a '12 Dawes Haymaker 1200 from BD last week. I've never put together or serviced a bike (BMX when younger and Trek 920 in college 10+ years ago) and I found pretty painless to get things put together and setup. This forum and Youtube make it easy enough to find the info you need to do it yourself. Go for it.

  27. #27
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    I may have to give up and wait for new pads and/or suck it up and wait 3 weeks except I'm going to a different place. Back brake is doing tons better, but not there yet. If I turn the dial one more time, the brakes hit the rotor. If I don't, I'm still not getting enough traction to stop soon enough. I'm stopping much better. It's like I'm so close, not not quite.

    When I went to clean up the front brake pads, one had a chip in the corner. Cleaned them up and put them back in. When I went to change the red dial with my tool it looked like the screw was stripped. I had used my hand to move the dial the first time since the wheel was off. With the tire in place, my hand doesn't fit to turn it.

    I haven't used a tool on the front brake. I did try to fix the brake by using a YouTube video before I took it in. Realized that with a concussion I was useless and took it up to get looked at. I used my hand to turn the dial as well.

    Not sure I even feel like dealing with my LBS and arguing about it.

    Talked to another bike shop in Council Bluffs..will take a look at it tomorrow. Awesome. Worst case scenario is having to wait a couple of weeks if it needs a serious fix since he said he was a week behind.

    WooHoo..get to head to civilization tomorrow. Too bad I can't head out to Swanson while there if he finishes the bike or with my Mukluk. Not sure I want to attempt that alone given my lack of experience. At least I know the hospital is 3 miles down the road if I ever feel ready to go it alone.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bethany1 View Post
    Back brake is doing tons better, but not there yet. If I turn the dial one more time, the brakes hit the rotor. If I don't, I'm still not getting enough traction to stop soon enough. I'm stopping much better. It's like I'm so close, not not quite.
    Sounds like you're getting the hang of those brakes. In my experience, sometimes I have to deal with a little bit of rotor rubbing in order to get the brakes to perform the way I want them to. Perhaps your brakes will be the same. If you can tolerate a bit of rubbing then you can set your brakes up closer.

    Make sure that your pads are hitting the rotor nice and squarely. If your top or bottom of the pad hits first, that's another reason that your pads might need to be adjusted such that they rub a little. I'm not a fan of the conical washers that Avid uses to mount their calipers to the adapter because they tend to allow the caliper to ride misaligned.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

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