Advice on toolkit- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Reputation: LoneReaction's Avatar
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    Smile Advice on toolkit

    So far I've survived on my multitool, but it can be a real pain in the ass to use sometimes.

    Don't need no park tools, just something simple that I will be able to use to do my own servicing (will learn from watching online videos and stuff).

    Thought of getting this: https://www.evanscycles.com/products...anics-ec006795

    What do you guys think? I don't really know what the stuff in bold does.



    Features
    ISIS/ Shimano BB tool (11B1)
    8 Groove spoke wrench (12F8)
    Cassette tool (09C1)
    Crank puller (04C2)
    Chain tool (61C2)

    2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6mm hex key set (36Q1)
    6 inch Adjustable wrench (25H6)
    8mm Hex key (35V8)
    8 & 10mm open ended spanner
    2 x Flat head screw drivers
    2 x Cross head screw drivers
    1/2inch drive adaptor
    Hollowtech 2/ MegaExo adaptor (11F1)
    Chain Whip (53A2)
    Pedal & box wrench (34A2)
    Nylon tyre lever set (64N3)
    New rider, MTBing is fun!

  2. #2
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    I got the nashbar kit. It has done just fine for everything I have wrenched on. Cept i sheared the crank puller on some really old cranks. It also had ratchet allen heads instead of keys which I think is a big advantage.

    and the chain tool that usually come in these things are trash. ive gone through i think three low end tools and finally manned up and bought the park tool.

  3. #3
    Cantankerous Old Fart
    Reputation: XCSKIBUM's Avatar
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    At 1st I thought it was a great kit until I went to the site & enlaged the photo.

    The #2 Phillips screwdriver is not the proper tip shape & will strip out #2 phillips screw heads when any significant torque is applied. That trait is common on lower quality philips screwdrivers.

    That leads me to believe the rest of the "kit" will be of dubious quality.

    Still, the reviews seem to be good so maybe it's worth the gamble.

    It certainly is a rather complete tool kit & having it all in a plastic case is a BIG bonus.

  4. #4
    Cantankerous Old Fart
    Reputation: XCSKIBUM's Avatar
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    Never mind,

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by XCSKIBUM
    Never mind,
    What did you want to say?
    New rider, MTBing is fun!

  6. #6
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    I have a Super B tool box (it was reasonably cheap) and I am happy with it. If your bike is in good condition I suspect the tool box pictured will be fine. I have damaged my cone spanners trying to work on old wheels and some damage to the bottom bracket socket again trying to remove one from an old rusted bike. My cheap toosl work great on bikes in good condition. If the price is good go for it.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  7. #7
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    Just buy tools as needed.

  8. #8
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    Can't speak to quality, but it looks like more than youneed for a good start. Having it in a handy case is nice as you can easily put it in your car and take it to the trailhead. Off the top of my head, the only things that I use that aren't in the box are tools to replace cables like wire cutters, crimpers (for the things you put on the end of wires), pokey thing to open up ends of housings after you cut them. On the other hand, a lot of people prefer to have their LBS replace cables.

    Over time, you may want to add to your collection. I like the triangle allen wrenches (but you still need individual ones as the triangle ones don't always fit). A torque wrench can come in handy. I found out just how much I under-torqued the cleats on my new shoes when my husband insisted on following up with his torque wrench.

    I don't see a torx wrench there. They are handy if you need to replace rotors for disk brakes (get the size you need for your brake bolts if you get one of these).

  9. #9
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    Reputation: DavidR1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Just buy tools as needed.
    Bingo!!

    Buy quality tools, but not till you need them (or know you will need them). Quality allen keys are the one thing that you know you will need over and over.
    CyclingCentralVa.org

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidR1
    Bingo!!

    Buy quality tools, but not till you need them (or know you will need them). Quality allen keys are the one thing that you know you will need over and over.
    I second this motion. You will never regret spending money on good tools. Oh, and good does not mean lifetime warranty (I'm looking at you Craftsman) when they break halfway through a job.

    Also, if this is only for bike work, buy three sets of allen keys. They're cheap, and you never want to have to go looking for them. Or, even better, get a folding set to take on rides, a long handled set, and a socket set for use on a torque wrench.

  11. #11
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    I have the icetools hollow-tech II socket and chain whip and I think they are better than the park tool equivalents.
    The price on the set looks good.I would probably throw away the screwdrivers and hexkeys but the rest looks like they are good tools based on my experience with icetools.I am a tool snob that uses snapon screwdrivers and VIM allen wrenchs

  12. #12
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    I bought a Nash bar deluxe kit ($125) and then added a couple of tools like good park allens.
    Monte
    Lodging & Guiding for SW Utah Trails
    http://www.vrbo.com/298759
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  13. #13
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    I would say go out and get a good set of (metric) allen wrenches and a set of screwdrivers (or one with multiple heads); that should be good for 90% of bike maintenance.

  14. #14
    Old Punk
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    I got an XLC 33pc set on hella sale at my lbs. No comparison in quality when beside a park kit, but I got it for $35(50% off). One year later, it's been used to tear down and pm 5 bikes, re-built one and for all kinds of upgrades. The off brand kits are not for a torque monkey. If you do not have much finesse, or if "tighter is always better" is your motto, buy Park. My plan is to ask for a Park kit from the wife & kids for x-mas or b-day when this kit fails me.
    '09 Specialized Rockhopper expert 29
    Born 26" trials
    '07 Specialized Allez

  15. #15
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    ^^This^^

    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Just buy tools as needed.

    Go to Sears and get a set of metric allen wrenches, flat & phillips head screw drivers and a small set of torx drivers.

    Buy higher quality, bike specific tools as required.

    Ken
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  16. #16
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    Are you located in the UK? If not, I suggest checking out Price Point: http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/145...--21-Tools.htm

    Their Sette tools are pretty solid and that kit is cheaper than the evans kit (assuming you're in the US and would avoid the unfavorable exchange rate + shipping.
    :wq

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nachomc
    Are you located in the UK? If not, I suggest checking out Price Point: http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/145...--21-Tools.htm

    Their Sette tools are pretty solid and that kit is cheaper than the evans kit (assuming you're in the US and would avoid the unfavorable exchange rate + shipping.
    Actually worse, I'm in Asia. Singapore, specifically. Evans cycle is great for me cause there's free shipping (if you order over around 80USD).
    It's ironic, I'm closer to china and taiwan where these things are usually made, but it normally costs more than in the US or UK.

    A single "Full service" by LBS costs more than the Ice Toolz kit. I'm thinking of taking a gamble with this toolkit, and if I do use any of the parts enough to spoil them, I'll replace them with park tools.
    New rider, MTBing is fun!

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