Advice on 700c Trekking Rims/Wheelsets- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Advice on 700c Trekking Rims/Wheelsets

    Hi guys,

    I have a Kona Smoke, a steel frame urban bike. I would like to change its wheelset for a more robust rims and hubs to use it like an hybrid Urban/Trekking Bike. I cannot find many options for 700c or ETRTO 622 size wheelsets (or rims/hubs DIY) with V-brake.

    Any help or ideas?


    So far i only found in Rims

    Mavic A119 (good, but entry level)
    http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/product.a...S&currency=USD

    DT Swiss TK 7.1 (better quality)
    http://www.sjscycles.co.uk/src/froog...lack-14601.htm

    but very difficult to find Hubs for V-brake. I could also go for some Wheelset not too very expensive.

    Cheers,
    Sebastian
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Advice on 700c Trekking Rims/Wheelsets-smoke.jpg  


  2. #2
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    you can use disk hubs with a V brake rim. You can also use a V brake compatible 29er wheel.

  3. #3
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    There are others out there...

    as well. The Salsa Delgado hoop is stout, 22.5mm wide so suitable for a wider range or tires, and a good buy. And there's the Mavic A719 which is the much better quality brother of the A119. Certainly the equvalient of the DT 7.1. All but the 119's are favored for fully loaded Touring by many riders. On the lighter side there's the Mavic Open Pro as well. All are availalbe in 32 ot 36 spoke hole drillings. The 36 holers are a plus for treking or touring with loads, i.e. panniers etc. Oh and as an after thought, there's the Mavic A319 as well. It falls right in the middle between the 119 and 719. It's also designed for touring and treking.

    So there are other choices out there.

    And there are lots of hubs out there to chose from. As others have noted you'd have to switch from free wheel to cassette to run most of them. But Phil Wood, Shimano XT and LX, the older models with cup and cones and free bearings, not the new caged bearing models, Hope Pro IIIs, are probably the top 3 for serious touring and treking. All are easily user serviceable, and durable if properly maintained. Considering your area of the world, I'd be inclined to give the knod to Shimano or Hope though.

    Good Dirt
    Last edited by Squash; 11-17-2009 at 08:14 AM.
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  4. #4
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    Your current bike has an eight speed freewheel, so you'd need to compensate for that. Personally, I'd stick with the current wheels unless there is something wrong with your current wheels, but that's just me.

  5. #5
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    you can use disk hubs with a V brake rim.

    I did know that, so no problem haven disk hubs without discs?. Thanks for the tip!


    Squash, pretty good info! where i can find more info on the Salsa Delgado Hoop, i did a search on Google and couldnīt find anything.

    Mavic A719 700c Rim looks good, but it is almos the same price than the DT Swiss 7.1 which looks a bit more solid profile in the close up picture.

    As others have noted you'd have to switch from free wheel to cassette to run most of them. But Phil Wood, Shimano XT and LX, the older models with cup and cones and free bearings, not the new caged bearing models.

    I didn't know i would have to make more changes. I just thought rims, spokes and hubs. Looks a bit more complicated that i thought to make a new wheel. I will ask the store how to do the change from freewheel to a new system.


    Personally, I'd stick with the current wheels unless there is something wrong with your current wheels, but that's just me.

    Well, i will stick to them for as long as they endure. Anyhow i thought to start buying some stuff in sale piece by piece to have my new wheel in the future.

  6. #6
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    If you want an inexpensive set, I put these on my old touring bike.
    http://bicyclewheelwarehouse.com/ind...d&productId=39

    They're a pretty sturdy wheelset. Wide rims seem more 29er than 700c, and Deore hubs can be pretty durable if you grease them periodically.

    Edit: this assumes your Kona has 135mm rear hub spacing (standard mtb spacing).
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the advice on the wheelset.

    this assumes your Kona has 135mm rear hub spacing (standard mtb spacing).

    I would not know for sure, i am quite new on bike mechanics. Here are the specs. of Kona Smoke in case you might see more things that i do.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Advice on 700c Trekking Rims/Wheelsets-kona-smoke-copia.jpg  


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzapuca
    I would not know for sure, i am quite new on bike mechanics. Here are the specs. of Kona Smoke in case you might see more things that i do.
    I can't tell from those specs. Just remove your rear wheel and measure the distance between the dropouts (where the hub sits).

    Or, if you have access to a 26" mountain bike, just see if you can fit the rear hub from the mtb into your dropouts.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailville
    I can't tell from those specs. Just remove your rear wheel and measure the distance between the dropouts (where the hub sits).
    Or, if you have access to a 26" mountain bike, just see if you can fit the rear hub from the mtb into your dropouts.
    Especially on a steel frame, does it really matter?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPark
    Especially on a steel frame, does it really matter?
    He could spread it, but not everyone is up to spreading their frame. Plus, with hybrid/urban bikes like that, I have no idea what they might do with rear hub spacing.

    Sheldon Brown has good info on his site for both hub spacing and frame spreading.
    http://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  11. #11
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    Sorry guys i kind of lost in what you are discussing. You mean spreading like opening the frame? I don't know if that info is relevant or not but i can fit Schwalbe Big Apple 28"x2.00" tires in the rear wheel without problem, not the usual width for most regular urban bike like the Kona Smoke frame has.

  12. #12
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    We're talking about hub width/spacing. Visit the Sheldon Brown link posted and you'll learn everything you need to know about it.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzapuca
    Sorry guys i kind of lost in what you are discussing. You mean spreading like opening the frame? I don't know if that info is relevant or not but i can fit Schwalbe Big Apple 28"x2.00" tires in the rear wheel without problem, not the usual width for most regular urban bike like the Kona Smoke frame has.
    We were talking about hub spacing, where the rear hub slides into frame. Since you have 700c wheels, there is a good chance you have 130mm spacing, and not 135 which is the common size for mtb hubs. A steel frame can be easily spread to accomidate a 5mm difference, but a good 700c touring wheel would be your best bet.

  14. #14
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    Thanks for the good info guys. I checked the very informative Sheldon Brown site and has very clear data on spacing.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by uzapuca
    Thanks for the good info guys. I checked the very informative Sheldon Brown site and has very clear data on spacing.
    Just make sure you measure though. Hybrid bikes (like yours) are part mountain bike, part road bike, so you can't assume anything.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  16. #16
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    Thanks for that good info Trailville. I will definitely measure this gap. That the good this about this forum (specially for a newbie) everyday i learn a lot.

    Cheers,

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