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  1. #1
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead! * noob alert-_- help, how do i do anything to my mountain bike!! -_- noob alert *

    Hello there future headache recipients....

    i have an all stock trek 800 Sport.
    what i'm looking to do is disassemble it completely, clean it and replace most of the stock parts.
    how can i measure for disc breaks?
    rims?
    fork?

    i've already ordered the zinn's guide to mountain bikes...

    anybody have any tip on buying tools?
    i'm looking to do everything to my bike myself...

    just need to be pointed in the right direction would be nice...
    and NOT over a cliff!!!

    P.S.
    if you hate my bike, please don't...
    we all don't have money to buy a shiny new mongoose from k-mart...
    like others on here...
    ^was a joke^

  2. #2
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    For what it's gonna wind up costing you it'd probably be cheaper, quicker, and better to just get a better bike.
    My 02.
    Round and round we go

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by theMeat View Post
    For what it's gonna wind up costing you it'd probably be cheaper, quicker, and better to just get a better bike.
    My 02.
    dam,
    i like my old bike..

  4. #4
    YYZ
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    Don't spend too much money on it. If I were you and want to get familiar with your bike, buy a nice little tool set like this one: Sette ST-21 Tool Kit - 21 Tools at Price Point. Take the whole bike apart and put it back together and tune the thing. It's a great achievement. And yea, I agree, it ain't worth it to upgrade on a bike like that.

  5. #5
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    Good for you for wanting to learn how to work on your bike! I see too many threads on here saying "took my bike to the LBS and now its messed up". No one is going to care and love for your bike as much as you do, so if you want it done right do it yourself.

    A picture and description of the parts on your bike would be helpful. Since the Trek 800 has changed so much over the years its hard to help you without knowing what is on your bike.

    As far as tools, order a basic tool kit. The bare minimum tools needed are allen wrenches (metric), tire levers, a chain tool and cable cutters. Whenever I need to do something to my bike, I just buy whatever tool it is I need to do it. Over time you will assemble a great tool collection.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by YYZ View Post
    Don't spend too much money on it. If I were you and want to get familiar with your bike, buy a nice little tool set like this one: Sette ST-21 Tool Kit - 21 Tools at Price Point. Take the whole bike apart and put it back together and tune the thing. It's a great achievement. And yea, I agree, it ain't worth it to upgrade on a bike like that.
    +1 This. Also make sure that you get the specific tool/socket for both your bottom bracket and cassette/freewheel. Also get a tube of grease like Park Tool PPL-1, and some thread locker like LocTite for bolt threads on areas like your stem. I haven't read Zinn's but if it's even close to Park Tool's BBB (Big Blue Book), then there should be comprehensive lists of recommended tools needed to do the jobs. Best thing you could do is read that guide cover to cover a couple of times before even touching a tool, and if you're not sure about something ask here and/or at the LBS. If your shop is like mine they will be very helpful so that you can get the most out of your bike. Then once it's tweaked and peaked, ride it like you stole it!
    The ridiculousness of cycling clothes increase exponentially in relation to the distance from your bicycle.

  7. #7
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    I feel for ya, I love(d) my trek and thought I'd just upgrade parts that were worn out. I started number crunching and quickly realized that it will be more expensive to replace parts than to buy a new bike. Especially if you plan to do a little upgrading. However, if you've got cash to burn and don't mind paying more (and doing all the labor, which is half the fun imo) then go for it. Personally I just went and used that money to buy a shiny new bike with a great frame and lesser components (Giant xTc) that I can make small upgrades to over time. All in all, you have to love the bike to ride it. If you love your old bike, learn to fix it, replace a few necessary parts, buy a kick ass fork, and ride the begezzes out of it. If you want to buy a new bike, buy one that will keep you happy for a long time. If you get another cheaper end one you'll end up yearning for a better bike sooner than you think. Just my experience.

  8. #8
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    These sites will compliment your Zinns. Park Tools has a "Repair Help" section. Top, right side of the main page.
    Park Tool Co. Park Tool Co.
    Sheldon's site is a mess but well worth wading through.
    Sheldon Brown-Bicycle Technical Information
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  9. #9
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    By all means , pull it apart, clean everything but only replace what's broken, IMO. Use the bike as a learning tool and to decide if MTB is what you want to do, then save up for something that will be adequate for your improved skill.... Also looked at your posts, had no idea why you were in the red, so I was able to bump you to green. Welcome to MTBR.
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  10. #10
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    I don't think that bike can be fit with disc brakes as stock. You could get a new fork and put one up front but the rear brake would need to stay v brake with any practical solution. You would also need to buy new wheels and you're really starting to spend nearly the same amount of money as you would on a new bike.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowfoxinc111 View Post
    dam,
    i like my old bike..
    I hear ya, that's why I have a garage filled with bikes LOL.
    Seriously thou, it a matter of math. Spend less money, get a better bike, it's a no brainer. Trust me, you'll like it just as much or more soon enough.
    And I'm not saying don't wrench or learn to your own bikes either. Think every mtber should on some level.
    This time of year is tops for finding great used deals too, but ya gota be patient, and do your homework so you know what you're looking at.
    Round and round we go

  12. #12
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowfoxinc111 View Post
    Hello there future headache recipients....

    i have an all stock trek 800 Sport.
    what i'm looking to do is disassemble it completely, clean it and replace most of the stock parts.
    how can i measure for disc breaks?
    rims?
    fork?

    i've already ordered the zinn's guide to mountain bikes...

    anybody have any tip on buying tools?
    i'm looking to do everything to my bike myself...

    just need to be pointed in the right direction would be nice...
    and NOT over a cliff!!!

    P.S.
    if you hate my bike, please don't...
    we all don't have money to buy a shiny new mongoose from k-mart...
    like others on here...
    ^was a joke^
    I'll repeat what others have said. good on you for wanting to work on your own bike. A tool kit like posted is an easy starter, but may not be the cheapest way to go about it. At minimum, you'll need a metric allen set, metric cone wrenches for hub bearings and whatnot, a crank puller, bottom bracket tool for your specific bb, cassette tool for your specific cassette, a decent set of cable/housing cutters. you can get an awful lot done with those tools. you can make do without a pedal wrench - many adjustable wrenches will work. they just need to be narrow enough. many modern pedals won't even work with a pedal wrench. they use an allen wrench.

    From there, by all means disassemble and clean the bike, paying attention to moving parts. All you'll need for the cleaning is a cheap plastic tub and some degreaser. Simple Green works fine.

    At that point, I'd suggest only replacing worn and/or broken parts. chain, cassette, cables/housing, and whatever else turns up. Maybe your bb and/or headset if necessary.

    Next, get yourself some good grease. I've been using the same tube of Phil Wood grease for years, and I've been using it on 4 different bikes. Grease will last a long time if all you're using it on are bicycles. A can of teflon spray lube is also work keeping around. I'll use it for random squeaks and such (like the ones that turn up on my saddle), and you'll definitely need a chain lube. A good teflon lube should work for your chain, too. Kill 2 birds with one stone.

    Take your time putting the bike back together, making sure everything is installed and adjusted just the way you like. This sort of thing is a great winter project. Thing is, this bike is old enough that trying to upgrade everything is going to force you into a lot of compatibility problems that you won't be prepared to handle. Things like multitudes of bottom bracket standards, different hub spacing standards, different head tube and headset standards, rim widths, drivetrain differences, etc. Very little has remained constant since that bike came out. Some of those standards are still used, but less so than a lot of the newer ones.

    I'm sure most of us can recount some kind of story where we bought an incompatible part, or we know of someone who bought an incompatible part in the past. It's one thing when it's a single part and you didn't catch that it wasn't compatible, but it's an entirely different one when you're trying to overhaul an entire bike and you have to wade through compatibility issues on every single part you're considering (and you're a new rider unaware of possible incompatibilities).

  13. #13
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    The best thing to learn maintenance is to pick one thing to learn or replace, then learn what to do to fix it. Don't rush off to replace everything because what theMeat said is right.if you replace everything you might as well bought a new bike. But if you learn one thing at a time, you will gain knowledge and not just new kit. If you can find someone who has wrenched a bike before, that will save you time and money. Learning things by trial and error has a tendency to create more problems than you end up fixing.

  14. #14
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    First hit on a Google image search has the fork on backwards. D'oh!

    I don't know when they stopped making these, but it's been a while. So I at least know that your bike is pretty old and probably has some compatibility issues with contemporary parts.

    Bikes that were cool back in the day don't magically stop being cool. But trying to modernize is a nightmare, so with older bikes it's all about goals and expectations.

    For me, mountain bikes are a means to an end. Generally mountain biking, but I realize people might want to ride them to work, ride them up and down a MUP, even do road miles on them.

    If you like the bike, it's worth cleaning and tuning up. Beyond that... harder to say. Right now - before you throw a bunch of money at a big project - is an opportunity to be clear about what you want.

    What do you want? Not in terms of parts. In terms of how you use your bike, and how you'd like to use it.

    And, as some others have already mentioned, pictures and a model year would be helpful.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by y0chang View Post
    The best thing to learn maintenance is to pick one thing to learn or replace, then learn what to do to fix it. Don't rush off to replace everything because what theMeat said is right.if you replace everything you might as well bought a new bike. But if you learn one thing at a time, you will gain knowledge and not just new kit. If you can find someone who has wrenched a bike before, that will save you time and money. Learning things by trial and error has a tendency to create more problems than you end up fixing.

    Agreed,

    Good for you for wanting to learn how to work on your bike but I take it one part at a time. It's one thing for an experienced person to tear down a bike an it's another for a beginner. A beginner can easily become frustrated during the process and loose interest leaving them selves with stack of parts. So pick a part/area and master it before moving on to the next part. This also allows you to understand a perticular part better an whether you need or want to upgrade it later.

    Ride safe.

  16. #16
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    Build a good relationship with your LBS. Some will let you borrow a repair stand if they are not too busy and they will also give you good advice. I pick the brain of my mechanic buddy quite frequently, and always get good advice in return. Helpful hint: bring them a case of their favorite beer. It goes a long ways... rock on and good luck!
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  17. #17
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    It's not so much the know how and the instruction book, I have 2 edition of Zinns books but the tool. You don't need that many tools to fix and maintain the bike but to completely disassemble parts clean and put back requires some specialty tools an it can get expensive quickly and not worth it for an old bike.

    If the bike is ridable now just do some basic maintenance and save up for a new/used bike.

  18. #18
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    good advice here - but I do like your attitude of wanting to do it all yourself!
    +rep
    Honestly... ahh I give up

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