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  1. #301
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    Got a Kolsch a week into lagering right now, should be ready just in time for the 4th of July. I tasted it after primary and it was delicious if a bit sweet, I'm thinking that lagering will dry it out a bit though.

  2. #302
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    At the moment I've got a witbier in primary, tossing it into my secondary this weekend.

    My bill is;

    3 lbs Wheat DME
    1.5 lbs Dextrose
    1 lb 2 row malt
    1 lb white wheat malt
    .75 lb flaked oats
    1 oz hallertau 60 min
    3 oz orange peel 10 min
    1 tsp coriander 10 min

    using WLP400.

    Pretty generic I know but I'm trying to get the basics down.

  3. #303
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    I'm much better at making time to brew beer than I am at making time to ride. So....


    Witbier, 5 will be served at a fest through a randal over peaches.
    Huell Melon Saison - will serve at the same fest.
    Pale Ale - Cascade and Amarillo
    Dortmunder Lager - just tapped this and it is pretty killer

    Will brew a Rye APA this weekend. Gotta keep the pipeline full.
    Schemy

  4. #304
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    Got a lot sitting around aging..

    but new on tap Grapefruit IPA and Saison..

    Waiting.. Tripel IPA, Saison with Brett, Berliner Weisse, German Alt.
    BBZ

    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy - Benjamin Franklin

  5. #305
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    Just brewed a clone of Rogues Shakespeare Stout, and cracked a keg of schwarzbier that has been conditioning for a month or so. Holy shit it's good! So simple, but perfect for this time of year.

  6. #306
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    Just racked an APA and stuffed a bunch of Belma whole leafs into a weighted hop bag in the 10 gal cony keg. Going to let it sit for a few weeks. Belmas are very pineapple/mango/tropical fruit, so we'll see how it turns out. It was the major hop in the beer, along with Citra and Cascade. Next up is my first crack at a Grisette. Going to lacto sour about 20% of a saison batch and add it back in at kegging.

  7. #307
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    An [almost] clone of Rogue's Shakespeare stout, just in time for winter. I had no Cascade so used Pacific Jade to bitter and Amarillo at FO. I'm thinking about splitting it as I've got too much for one keg, thinking about putting 10L of it onto cacao nibs, coffee, or plums. Thoughts?

  8. #308
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    10L of stout + 1.3kg of Black Doris and about a cup of juice from one of the cans.
    What's your latest homebrew?-.jpg

    The other 12L went into a keg as-is, and may be used to blend with the plum one depending on how tart/strong it is.
    What's your latest homebrew?-b.jpg

    It's the first time I've ever used fruit in a beer, and I've gotta say I'm pretty excited about this one!

  9. #309
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    My wife and I have recently started brewing our own beer with the backdoor neighbor. So far we have brewed a 15gallons of a nice porter with 3gals of it going to a coffee backed porter.

    Then an assortment of pale ales, with 5 gals with a steamer yeast, 5 gals of a pale and 5 with a lavender back. All beers have been with locally grown cascadia hops, Camano Island Coffee and my backyard lavender.

    We recently picked up a kegerator for our garage and are using 2 1/6th kegs with our varieties in it.

    Next weekend I think we will be back to the porter, maybe without the coffee back though, which while good, was really limited to time of day you could drink it without being up all night.

    The nice thing about being in Seattle is easy access to fresh hops, dried hops, brewing grains and a crazy microbrew culture. Seattle just welcomed its 61st brewery. That is just seattle proper, not including all the surrounding areas. Lotsa beer and lotsa coffee, killer mountain biking, great place to be!
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  10. #310
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    You know most people **** on American beer but that's just the macro brew's. I actually love Sam Adams, consistent quality and reasonably priced. Craft beer in America is legit stuff although I'm sick and tired of all the insanely high gravity, insanely hopped IPA's.

    In fact at the moment I've got an American Pale Ale in my Primary and going into secondary on Sat.

    3 lbs Pale Ale LME
    1 lbs Briess Munich DME
    2 lbs Dextrose
    0.5 lb 2 row pale malt
    0.5 white wheat malt
    0.25 oz Magnum 60 min
    0.25 oz Perle 30 min
    1 oz Cascade 10 min
    1 oz Cascade dry hop


    Forgot to take an OG reading when I first put it in the primary but based on my gravity from the second day I suspect that it'll be just shy of 5% ABV and hit a pretty low gravity for easy drinking.

    Next up on the list is a Chocolate Stout but I'm going to have to figure out what I want in it and how much (obviously going with dutch chocolate but I need to figure out if I want to add some lactose to sweeten it up like a milk stout or not and what exactly my bill is going to be).

  11. #311
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    Got this in the fermenter right now, just added 180g of cacao nibs and it smells awesome! I also added 100g of Dutch cocoa in the mash too, tasted damn good so far.
    Milk Chocolate Stout ? Bertus Brewery

    Last time I added espresso instead of cacao and it was equally awesome, it's a great recipe.

  12. #312
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    Will start my first homebrew on Wednesday 9/21/16
    Will be an AS Evil Dead Red clone
    10 gal MTun/Lauter and HLT, 18 gal Brew kettle 15 gal fermenter
    2 pumps, quick connect hoses, 3-5 gal kegs and a two tap kegerator with C02 bottle filler.
    Fermentation chamber is frost free fridge with Inkbird digital temp controller

  13. #313
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    Hey, cool thread!

    I've recently gotten into homebrewing myself (well, about a year and a half ago now), and have been trying to master a recipe handed down from my great grandpa. I've got his handwritten transcription of the recipe he's alleged to have made during Prohibition. It's a dirty, nasty recipe that's designed to give you a buzz after only 3 days, but it mellows out and gives a very nice craft-beer experience after 2 solid weeks of fermentation followed by 9-14 days (depending on the weather) conditioning in the bottle.

    The beauty is that it's a super simple recipe that takes really well to alterations. I've done it with distilled, as well as spring water; pelletized as well as fresh hops; hop-flavored as well as plain malt; a light barrel-aging process; and the most recent batch has a different yeast.

    On top of that, I recently went through a kegging and tapping training at work, so now I'm itching to get a kegging setup and go nuts with that!

    Now, for Memorial Day, I'm heading to my uncle's cabin...and there's an artesian well nearby. I've got access to 2 of those 5-gallon watercooler jugs that I could take along. Is there a good way to transport and preserve that much water for a few days, maybe a week or two, or would I simply be better off buying a new bottle of distilled water?
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  14. #314
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    Quote Originally Posted by bucksaw87 View Post
    I've got access to 2 of those 5-gallon watercooler jugs that I could take along. Is there a good way to transport and preserve that much water for a few days, maybe a week or two, or would I simply be better off buying a new bottle of distilled water?
    Really hard to say. What wouldn't cause problems with the brewing process and yeast?
    Can you seal them up well? Can you keep them fairly cold? Maybe some antimicrobal copper coils?

  15. #315
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    Quote Originally Posted by GuitsBoy View Post
    Really hard to say. What wouldn't cause problems with the brewing process and yeast?
    Can you seal them up well? Can you keep them fairly cold? Maybe some antimicrobal copper coils?
    I suppose I could buy a pack of these
    https://www.amazon.com/5-gallon-wate...er%20jug%20cap

    But keeping the water cool for that time would be the tricky part. I know they've kept several jugs of the same artesian water at the cabin for weeks and months, but a coffee maker is far less sensitive than beer is...
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  16. #316
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    Use the water. What're you worried about? Keeping it cool ain't gonna do nothin.

  17. #317
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    Quote Originally Posted by positr0nic View Post
    Use the water. What're you worried about? Keeping it cool ain't gonna do nothin.
    What am I worried about? Scum, bacterial growth, stuff like that.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  18. #318
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    True, it may degrade in quality quite a bit if you're keeping it that long. Not worth the trouble probably if you're worried about it.

    I use reverse osmosis filtered water to brew with and add minerals back in, tailored to the particular beer style. My tap water is extremely hard so this helps quite a bit.
    If i'm really lazy i'll at least blend regular filtered water with 50% ro water.

  19. #319
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    I'm going to give it a shot. It won't likely be more than a week before I make a new batch of beer, but there's a distinct possibility.
    Quote Originally Posted by positr0nic View Post
    True, it may degrade in quality quite a bit if you're keeping it that long. Not worth the trouble probably if you're worried about it.

    I use reverse osmosis filtered water to brew with and add minerals back in, tailored to the particular beer style. My tap water is extremely hard so this helps quite a bit.
    If i'm really lazy i'll at least blend regular filtered water with 50% ro water.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  20. #320
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    Well let's see...

    I've got an ESB that's maturing in the bottles, needs another week or so.

    Just opened a couple bottles of a tangerine ginger wit I made for my wife. Refreshing and light for summer.

    I'm about 1/2 way through the worst IPA that I've made - still drinkable, but I've made much much better. I think I let my primary temps get out of range on this one and got some fusel to it.

    Got a Scottish Wee Heavy in secondary, needs another few weeks.

    Lots more on the planning table, but everyone made a big case to brew more of a bourbon barrel porter I made last year. I should have started that one in the spring since it takes almost a year to fully come together.

    I need more room! Already told my wife, next house the basement is all mine.

  21. #321
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    Quote Originally Posted by bucksaw87 View Post
    I'm going to give it a shot. It won't likely be more than a week before I make a new batch of beer, but there's a distinct possibility.
    Update: I have the water. Two 5-gallon jugs that fit into the standard ol' water cooler.

    My question is, where does one beer end and the next one begin? I've got the pale ale recipe that I mentioned above, and for the past year, I've been using the same proportions of ingredients, but varying the type...as in, different types of malt, different types of hops added at different times in the boil, stuff like that. However, going on the recommendation of a local Homebrew shop, I want to actually double the amount of malt next go-round and halve the sugar. Would drastically altering the quantity of something like that effectively make it a "new" beer?
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  22. #322
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    Yes. Altering the ratio of malt to sugar significantly will impact the finished product, in a very imo positive way. If grandad didnít need to turn and burn a batch I suppose his recipe would have no sugar at all.

    When youíve been brewing for a good while, folks tend riff on a recipe. Keeping the base idea the same bit switching up components just to keep things interesting.

    Itís reasonable to think the sugar version was merely one permutation of his base recipe. In that light I think any alterations you make toward making a better tasting brew would be well within your grandadís recipe theme.

  23. #323
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    Quote Originally Posted by Railtrail View Post
    Yes. Altering the ratio of malt to sugar significantly will impact the finished product, in a very imo positive way. If grandad didnít need to turn and burn a batch I suppose his recipe would have no sugar at all.

    When youíve been brewing for a good while, folks tend riff on a recipe. Keeping the base idea the same bit switching up components just to keep things interesting.

    Itís reasonable to think the sugar version was merely one permutation of his base recipe. In that light I think any alterations you make toward making a better tasting brew would be well within your grandadís recipe theme.
    Pardon me for not knowing all the nomenclature, but I'm going to be brewing up a batch of the double-malted stuff tomorrow. I bought two cans of Muntons, already hop flavored, and a pack of extra hops for good measure.

    And funny that you mention recipe permutations... I think the handwritten recipe I have is an adaptation of a mail-order kit. I kinda wanna try the original handwritten recipe sometime and see what it tastes like when I follow those instructions to a T: Fleishmann's bread yeast, normal table sugar, and whatever kind of malt syrup can be found at the grocery store.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  24. #324
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    You'll have a much tastier beer if you leave out the sugar entirely and use actual brewing yeast. It's like $2 for a packet of dry yeast. Use dry malt extract unless you can find fresh liquid extract. Liquid extract goes bad a lot faster.

  25. #325
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    Quote Originally Posted by positr0nic View Post
    You'll have a much tastier beer if you leave out the sugar entirely and use actual brewing yeast. It's like $2 for a packet of dry yeast. Use dry malt extract unless you can find fresh liquid extract. Liquid extract goes bad a lot faster.
    Rest assured, every batch I've made thus far has been made with proper brewing ingredients...including liquid malt, properly dried hop pellets (except for the one batch made with fresh hops, right off the vine), and brewers' yeast. I was just saying that the original handwritten recipe calls for Fleishmann's yeast, baking sugar, and the kind of malt powder you'd make bread from. This recipe was designed, to borrow a phrase from @railtrail, to turn and burn and get a quick-n-dirty liquid that'll give you a buzz as ASAP as possible. It actually calls for bottling after a scant 3 days.

    I presented that handwritten recipe to the homebrew store last year, and he punched the ingredients into Beersmith (or some comparable software) to get a "modern" recipe...including specific Briess malts, Safale yeasts, and cane sugar. So, I've been playing with the modern recipe, trying different types/blends of malts; fresh or pelletized hops; and cane, corn, and beet sugar (corn has given me the best results thus far).

    So, this go-round, I've got artesian well water, twice the quantity/proportion of malt, and I'm planning on halving the quantity/proportion of sugars in the wort...which, if I understand my beer classifications properly, will bump this particular recipe from a pale ale to something resembling an amber.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  26. #326
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    Corn sugar will definitely give you the best results. It will produce more alcohol without effecting flavor negatively. I generally don't feel a need to boost alcohol content though. Table sugar and other types of sugar can produce off flavors in beer. It's harder for the yeast to break down to so it can be a bad thing. Some styles of beer like strong belgian beers call for table sugar because those styles of yeast can produce desirable flavors for that style. I've got an 11% belgian dark that I used a bunch of dark candi syrup with.

    Amber beers have a small amount of roasted grain that causes the color to change. So unless you're adding some steeping grains it'll probably still fall into the pale ale category, assuming its appropriately hopped. With extract brewing adding some steeping grains is usually how you make different styles, since there aren't very many different types of malt extract. All grain gives you a lot more flexibility, but you can still make lots of tasty stuff with extract.

    I don't think i've ever brewed the same beer twice and i've brewed quite a bit. I have my process down pretty well, but i'm always tweaking at least one minor thing which always results in a different end product.. so I wouldn't call it the same beer. Experimentation is a good part of the fun. I've got bunch of kegs of sour beers most well over a year old, once I start drinking them I can determine what to do differently next time. My main beers on tap now are an english ipa, hazy ipa and a saison.

  27. #327
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    Quote Originally Posted by positr0nic View Post
    Corn sugar will definitely give you the best results. It will produce more alcohol without effecting flavor negatively. I generally don't feel a need to boost alcohol content though. Table sugar and other types of sugar can produce off flavors in beer. It's harder for the yeast to break down to so it can be a bad thing. Some styles of beer like strong belgian beers call for table sugar because those styles of yeast can produce desirable flavors for that style. I've got an 11% belgian dark that I used a bunch of dark candi syrup with.

    Amber beers have a small amount of roasted grain that causes the color to change. So unless you're adding some steeping grains it'll probably still fall into the pale ale category, assuming its appropriately hopped. With extract brewing adding some steeping grains is usually how you make different styles, since there aren't very many different types of malt extract. All grain gives you a lot more flexibility, but you can still make lots of tasty stuff with extract.

    I don't think i've ever brewed the same beer twice and i've brewed quite a bit. I have my process down pretty well, but i'm always tweaking at least one minor thing which always results in a different end product.. so I wouldn't call it the same beer. Experimentation is a good part of the fun. I've got bunch of kegs of sour beers most well over a year old, once I start drinking them I can determine what to do differently next time. My main beers on tap now are an english ipa, hazy ipa and a saison.
    Thanks!

    Yeah, I'm currently transferring the wort to the fermenting bucket, so we'll see how this turns out. It's already MUCH darker in color than what I'm used to seeing, and smells a lot heartier.

    I was going off of a little flowchart thing I had seen online, regarding the difference in pale and other ales... basically, it said if one measure of malt was a pale ale, 1.5 to 2 measures would be an Amber, 2 to 3 would be a brown, then 2 to 3 measures with added grains and mixed up with some more, darker malts is where porters and stouts begin. It's obviously a simple flow chart, but I found it informative.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  28. #328
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    Quote Originally Posted by positr0nic View Post
    Use the water. What're you worried about? Keeping it cool ain't gonna do nothin.
    Finally got to drink the beer made with Artesian water... it's got a slightly off flavor, a little bit of lemony tang on the very back of the palate, and there's a lot of yeast sediment and excess foam. Probably needs to condition a bit more, but we'll see for sure.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  29. #329
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    Quote Originally Posted by bucksaw87 View Post
    Finally got to drink the beer made with Artesian water... it's got a slightly off flavor, a little bit of lemony tang on the very back of the palate, and there's a lot of yeast sediment and excess foam. Probably needs to condition a bit more, but we'll see for sure.
    Yep, that was exactly it...it needed more time conditioning in the bottle. It's got a nice mineral bite to it, and a smooth malty finish.
    I ride a 26'er with tubes and rim brakes.
    Yeah, I'm basically living in the stone age.

  30. #330
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    Jellied moose nose brown ale.

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