Need Help Dialing in my Legend- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    We the people ... Need Help Dialing in my Legend

    Hey guys, first post here. Hopefully I'm doing this right lol.

    A few months ago I got a 2012 Banshee Legend. It has a manitou Dorado and a fox rc4. I've been struggling to get it to feel "great." I love how the bike rails the corners, but I don't get that accelerating through rock gardens feeling everyone raves about. If I run the 30% sag it feels active but I hit my bottom bracket on everything. I filled up the bottom out chamber to like 190 (I weight 210 without gear) and turned the lsc/ rebound up. It's made the bike ride higher in it's travel and feel more supportive, but it's taken up some sag, and if I come through chunder the bike still packs up and I end up smashing pedals. I get a ton of pedal feed back and struck pedals..

    I'd like to be able to sag the bike a descent amount and get it to feel plush with less feedback, and not smack my bb anymore.

    Is the trick here adjusting my hsc? It's the one thing I am not great at fiddling with. Also, is there a manual for the legend frame? Like some key points for suspension setup that Banshee have put out there?

    Here is a video of a trail I like to ride for reference

    Also, does anyone know if manitou can adjust my shims for me if I send them the fork?

    Thanks for reading my noob post, any help is appreciated.
    Need Help Dialing in my Legend-bike-2.jpg

  2. #2
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    OK, I'll try to help...

    First of all, are you used to DH race bikes, as low BB is a feature that most share, and takes a bit of getting used to. There are a ot of benefits to be had from it once you get good at manouvering to avoid pedal strikes.

    How are you measuring the sag?
    Need Help Dialing in my Legend-legend-mkii.jpg

    I personally like the legend with around 25mm of shock sag = 35%ish sag. Some like more, some like less. 30% is minimum I would recommend for traction and pedal kickback reasons.

    What size chainring are you running? The smaller the chainring you run the more pedal kickback you will feel, I recommend 36-38 tooth as optimal range.

    If a bike is packing up, that normally suggests that the low speed rebound is too slow, so you could try reducing that to see if it helps, it will also help you stay higher in travel by returning you faster to sag after a hit. This will also help with the acceleration feeling through rock gardens as the suspension will be more active.
    Banshee Bikes Designer
    www.bansheebikes.com
    Banshee Blog

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by builttoride View Post
    OK, I'll try to help...

    First of all, are you used to DH race bikes, as low BB is a feature that most share, and takes a bit of getting used to. There are a ot of benefits to be had from it once you get good at manouvering to avoid pedal strikes.

    How are you measuring the sag?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I personally like the legend with around 25mm of shock sag = 35%ish sag. Some like more, some like less. 30% is minimum I would recommend for traction and pedal kickback reasons.

    What size chainring are you running? The smaller the chainring you run the more pedal kickback you will feel, I recommend 36-38 tooth as optimal range.

    If a bike is packing up, that normally suggests that the low speed rebound is too slow, so you could try reducing that to see if it helps, it will also help you stay higher in travel by returning you faster to sag after a hit. This will also help with the acceleration feeling through rock gardens as the suspension will be more active.
    The last bike I rode was a Santa Cruz butcher and before that a 2005 giant faith. Each bike was reasonably low but I did run more rebound and I have a habit of running my bikes oversprung. The way I was measuring sag on my legend was by subtracting the eye to eye while standing on the bike (dad measures it) by the eye to eye when nothing is on the bike, then dividing this number by the eye to eye to get the % sag. Is this the right way to do it?

    Also I believe I'm running the 38 tooth ring. Definitely gonna try more rebound.

  4. #4
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    Your way of measureing sag isn't quire right, s it's a percentage of the shocks stroke rather than total length.

    If you take the length of shock when uncompressed, subtract length of shock in sag position, and then take that number and see where it sit on the chart above. As I mentioned, I like around 25mm of shock compression at sag.

    Let me know what figure you are getting when you do this.
    Banshee Bikes Designer
    www.bansheebikes.com
    Banshee Blog

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