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  1. #1
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    XT Trail M8020 pedals...help with pedal strikes or just wishful thinking?

    Been riding DX M647 pedals for years. They are fine. The new Mojo3 has a super low (to me) BB and climbing rocky sections is noticeably more sketchy in regards to pedal strikes. I'll adjust, however I'm wondering if going to the thin profile caged XT Trail's will actually provide any real world benefit for this issue (climbing chunky rock step-ups).

    I see a good deal on them but no reason to change if they don't help with the issue, I like the DX just fine.
    thks

  2. #2
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    The 647's look a bit thick so imagine the XT/XTR trail pedals will help a bit. I run them on both my bikes with 170 and 165 mm cranks. The shorter cranks are more for the fact that I don't get on with 175's but the extra clearance is nice, something to consider as well. The 165's on my Hightower virtually eliminated pedal strikes unless I'm just not paying attention.

  3. #3
    recovering roadie
    Reputation: dobbs's Avatar
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    I have a bike that came with 170mm cranks and they didn't work for my knees. If you're interested in buying some Truvativ 170 mm cranks PM me.

  4. #4
    No Clue Crew
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    Simple question to answer yourself. Do the specs list the pedal thickness? If so, divide the difference in half. For instance, using totally invented numbers, letís say the XT is 4mm thinner. Presumably half that thickness will be above the axle and half below, giving you a clearance gain of 2mm. Is that enough to solve your problem?

    If you need a set measured, let me know.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  5. #5
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    Obviously 2 or 3 mm isn't going to really make any difference in the real world. However the XT pedals are also shaped differently, more svelte if you will. My DX are blocky.

    this is kind of where I was asking about real-world applications and if the pedals do indeed help navigate the rocky sections a little better. It's not just the thickness it's also the profile.

    Again, probably just wishful thinking on my part that these would make any difference.

    170 mm cranks might be an option or an option in combination with these pedals but I need to do a tad bit of research on shorter cranks.

  6. #6
    damned rocks...
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    I would say you are half right and half wrong, yes they are shaped differently, but in the end the thickness is not that different and you would have to split it.
    You can also get the M6000 trail pedals, they are not as bling but they are smaller than the XT trail.
    Last edited by Aglo; 12-14-2018 at 10:58 AM. Reason: Autocorrect :/

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aglo View Post
    .
    You can also get the M6000 trail pedals, they are not as bling but they are smaller than the XT trail.
    Hmm.... Not seeing those pedals online.

  8. #8
    EDR
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    I have a bike that came with 170mm cranks and they didn't work for my knees. If you're interested in buying some Truvativ 170 mm cranks PM me.
    Thanks, I'll think about that.

    I tried to spec this bike with 170 millimeter cranks knowing that it had a low bottom bracket. That didn't work out.I need to do a bit of research on that. I'm short so my first instinct is to think shorter cranks would be good for me. But I could be totally wrong.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Hmm.... Not seeing those pedals online.
    Try Shimano PD-ED500 SPD Trail pedal....
    I Pity The Fool That Can't Ride A Bike Without A Dropper!!

  10. #10
    EXORCIZE
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Obviously 2 or 3 mm isn't going to really make any difference in the real world. However the XT pedals are also shaped differently, more svelte if you will. My DX are blocky.
    I agree - trail pedals are not just a bit thicker, but longer in front, and wider. But I also think 3mm could make a difference over millions of rotations. Pedals strikes are typically a "just barely" experience.
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  11. #11
    damned rocks...
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Hmm.... Not seeing those pedals online.
    Quote Originally Posted by tom erb View Post
    Try Shimano PD-ED500 SPD Trail pedal....
    My mistake, like tom erb mentioned, it's the PD-ED500.
    But I'm having doubts, I don't own the M8020 nor the ED500, a friend has the ED500, and I am comparing the two by memory.

  12. #12
    NedwannaB
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    New 5010 and having same issue with typical Santa Cruz low bb. Going to switch out the 175 cranks to a set if 170's I have and put on my xtr trail pedals in hopes of gaining some clearance. At least its not going to cost me anything out of pocket.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JMac47 View Post
    New 5010 and having same issue with typical Santa Cruz low bb. Going to switch out the 175 cranks to a set if 170's I have and put on my xtr trail pedals in hopes of gaining some clearance. At least its not going to cost me anything out of pocket.
    Yeah these super-low bottom brackets are also super annoying to me. I knew the dimensions before I bought the bike so I'm not surprised by it but still... Not ideal for Phoenix area riding that's for sure.

    for those guys tearing it up on the Ibis website videos and the yeti website videos that's great. They're railing downhill on what looks to be buff single track to me and launching 5 foot drops to transition and ripping around berms at breakneck speed. That's not my type of riding..

    if I remember correctly my first 575 purchased in 2005 had a bottom bracket measurement over 14 in.

  14. #14
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    I also find the trend of low bottom brackets annoying. I really have to watch my pedal stroke on my Ibis Ripley LS at 13". It's also very sensitive to shock setup (the ripley that is).

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockman View Post
    I also find the trend of low bottom brackets annoying. I really have to watch my pedal stroke on my Ibis Ripley LS at 13". It's also very sensitive to shock setup (the ripley that is).
    yeah, I rode up Mormon for the first time in years last week and I couldn't believe how my pedals smashed into what used to be relatively simple step-ups. I'm talking about some of the stuff right after you leave the national / Mormon split and before you hit that hard Widowmaker Hill.

    part of it is because I've been out of the game on that type of terrain for a while so I need to re-acclimate myself, but no doubt a part of it is the low bottom bracket. I mean, if I hit a 6in dip in the trail I actually have to remind myself to not hit my next pedal stroke coming out of it.

    I'm kind of derailing my own thread though. This issue has been hashed out time and time again I'm sure. I'm just wondering if the thinner profile pedals might help. I'm guessing not really but I have found them at a good discount and with a free shipping coupon so maybe I'll just give them a try. I haven't bought new pedals in probably eight years so what the heck right? I just really like the DX pedals. The cage sits high up near the cleats which makes them very easy to get in to when I've stalled out.

    the XT trails are so much thinner I'm not sure the platform actually serves any purpose at all. On my DX pedals if I take a drop of two or three feet I think I can actually feel my foot compress into the cage, maybe it's just in my mind. but those xts are so thin I don't see any way they would ever provide any support to the shoe, it would simply be the cleats only, like the cageless m520s I had years ago.
    Last edited by eatdrinkride; 12-14-2018 at 08:18 PM.

  16. #16
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    For the money the XT Trail PD-M8020 is the bees knees. I run the XTR version but I do find the platform makes a difference. Especially when clipping back in on a techy climb. Or, simply not even clipping in, for example in a bail out scenario. As for support I don't think it makes any difference at all and the connection is all at the cleat.

  17. #17
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    I have the regular XT's on my XC hardtail and the Trails on the trail bike and the cage does help. You are right, it's not flat pedal type grip but does allow more grab/support if you miss getting in, come unclipped, etc. The shoe type makes a difference too, my XC shoes don't really touch the cage but my AM shoes with recessed cleats in the tread do. The shape seems to help a bit in deflecting rocks as well. But not sure how they compare to 647's, never tried those.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Thanks, I'll think about that.

    I tried to spec this bike with 170 millimeter cranks knowing that it had a low bottom bracket. That didn't work out.I need to do a bit of research on that. I'm short so my first instinct is to think shorter cranks would be good for me. But I could be totally wrong.
    Interesting, ibis was happy to spec my mojo3 with 170. Iím 5í7 and when I went to a professional bike fitting they said I could have even gone with 165. I got my fit shortly after my bike so not sure if itís the fit or crank length but I do notice I am a bit more of a spinner as opposed to a masher since. I have Xt pedals and love them - last forever even with pedal strikes.

    I have gotten used to planning my pedaling position - made me a better rider I guess.

    I do love my mojo, it is so much more fun in the turns then my previous ripely. Is it the tire size? Wheel size? Or lower bottom bracket? Or all of the above. Learning to deal with the pedal strikes was a small price to pay.

    You will get used to it
    Shorter cranks if your short should be a win win more then Pedals.
    Make sure you have enough air in your shock
    Use middle setting on rear shock for a little extra clearance.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bones2 View Post

    I do love my mojo, it is so much more fun in the turns then my previous ripely. Is it the tire size? Wheel size? Or lower bottom bracket? Or all of the above. Learning to deal with the pedal strikes was a small price to pay.

    You will get used to it
    Shorter cranks if your short should be a win win more then Pedals.
    Make sure you have enough air in your shock
    Use middle setting on rear shock for a little extra clearance.
    The bb on the Ripley LS is lower than the Mojo 3. As far as cornering I would venture a guess it's because of the wagon wheels and longer wheelbase.

  20. #20
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    To address some of these points...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bones2 View Post

    You will get used to it (in time yes, it seems I've been adjusting with each new frame, again not ideal)
    Shorter cranks if your short should be a win win more then Pedals. -(I'm 5'8'' with shoes, only ever owned 175mm cranks, maybe time to try shorter)
    Make sure you have enough air in your shock -(Yes, of course)
    U
    se middle setting on rear shock for a little extra clearance. -(No 'middle' setting per se. Fox X2 shock. The Mojo3 rides nice and high in it's travel so no need to run anything but full open, and I certainly wouldn't trade suspension feel/performance for pedal strikes ))
    Oh yeah, PM sent.

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