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  1. #1
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    what should i have done...

    yesterday morning on dc i had a small incident that has kind of been bugging me. the trail was VERY busy in the am. i was going down a short section (going down hill into a small wash, not a very deep one, 5-6 foot wide part of trail). up coming was 2 riders, so i scrubbed some speed when i saw them but did not stop. the first one stayed on the smooth single track path up, on my right. so i headed to the left down the rocky section. the guy behind him ( less than 2 bike lengths) didnít follow his buddy up the smooth and went to up the rocky section straight at me. i slammed my brakes slid put a foot down to pivot around to not hit him head on. During all of it i said SORRY as we crossed paths. and he in turned called me a fckin idiot.

    my first thoughts were, my bad i should of just stopped and let them go. but then i was like, no there was plenty of room. and for how many people were on the trail you would have to stop every 2 -5 min.

    was this my mess up? if so i learned from my mistake.
    or is it his for not following the line of the guy he was following?

    sorry if this is a dumb post, i just wanted to get it off my chest and get a 2nd point of view.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88mustanggt
    yesterday morning on dc i had a small incident that has kind of been bugging me. the trail was VERY busy in the am. i was going down a short section (going down hill into a small wash, not a very deep one, 5-6 foot wide part of trail). up coming was 2 riders, so i scrubbed some speed when i saw them but did not stop. the first one stayed on the smooth single track path up, on my right. so i headed to the left down the rocky section. the guy behind him ( less than 2 bike lengths) didnít follow his buddy up the smooth and went to up the rocky section straight at me. i slammed my brakes slid put a foot down to pivot around to not hit him head on. During all of it i said SORRY as we crossed paths. and he in turned called me a fckin idiot.

    my first thoughts were, my bad i should of just stopped and let them go. but then i was like, no there was plenty of room. and for how many people were on the trail you would have to stop every 2 -5 min.

    was this my mess up? if so i learned from my mistake.
    or is it his for not following the line of the guy he was following?

    sorry if this is a dumb post, i just wanted to get it off my chest and get a 2nd point of view.

    downhill yields to uphill.
    anger from others as a result of you not adhering to this "rule" should not, however, ruin your day. Without rules, we have chaos.

  3. #3
    pedaller
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    1) What yeti said

    2) Me thinks he chose the rocky line in order to create the conflict so that you could "learn"

    3) Name-calling is such a good way to help people learn

    4) I would've seriously been tempted to yell back at him: "You have yourself a great day too!"
    "Nobody ever told me not to try" - Curious George Soundtrack by Jack Johnson

  4. #4
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    i do understand uphill has the right away.
    so i should have just stopped, even though there was room for us to pass safely?
    or
    do think he should have followed the line of the guy in front of him instead of taking up the whole trail?

  5. #5
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    AFAIK, there are a couple of exceptions to the downhill yields to uphill rule, and are quite specific.

    1) If stopping to yield would actually cause a crash; in extremely technical terrain for example. No one should expect you to float matrix-style above all the sharp rocks to wait for them to go by.

    2) In a race environment, where there actually is plenty of room for experienced riders to pass safely without you stopping. Note the terms "race environment" and "experienced"... there are things that happen out on the race course that would never be expected or tolerated on a rec ride.

    That said, there are plenty of trail users who have read a different set of rules, or none at all, and will get mad at you no matter what you do. Don't let it ruin your ride, or theirs.

  6. #6
    dirt debutaunte
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    You should have waited, or at least slowed down more to figure out what their lines were. Having to slam on breaks and skid out means you weren't in control anyway.

    Even if the the guy behind saw you, he didn't have to follow his buddy's line. He might have been an ass, but he still had the right of way.

  7. #7
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    thanks for the input guys , i wasnt out of control, but i guess i should of just stopped. it just suprised me when guy number 2 pulled out of from behind guy 1 after i had passed guy 1 safely.

    i guess im still trying to fegure this all out, there has been countless times when i was climbing a slowsih grind and people going down it dont stop, they slow down and go off the "main line" to pass and continue on there way. are they all supose to stop?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88mustanggt
    i guess im still trying to fegure this all out, there has been countless times when i was climbing a slowsih grind and people going down it dont stop, they slow down and go off the "main line" to pass and continue on there way. are they all supose to stop?
    Technically, yes. But then, mountain bikers are always supposed to yield the right of way to hikers also... and the majority of hikers will step off the trail and wave you by. You have to figure it out each time in order to be safe. Assuming that oncoming traffic will yield results in a game of chicken that isn't always going to work out well, no matter who technically has the right-of-way.

  9. #9
    I love bike!
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    I don't think you did anything wrong by continuing down but if you're going to do so I think the downhill rider should take extra caution and always expect the unexpected and be prepared to get out of the way. In this case the other guy chosing a different line.

    The only thing I disagree with is your attempting to go by them on the left side of the trail. Last time I checked we are in the good ol' USofA and we still drive on the right side of the road

  10. #10
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Honestly, I think you moving over to the rough side and slowing down was enough. DC is a highway and there are few places on it where there is not room for 2-way traffic. Plus, the "hills" are so short and staggered that the uphill right-of-way rule often just does not apply. The washes are the only exception and most of them still have room for two riders - if not, wait for the uphill rider before you descend.

    I'm guessing that the 2nd rider decided to blow past his buddy without seeing you first and got miffed. Oh well... he should have looked ahead before bolting and held his line after he saw you. Testosterone was the likely culprit - there's a lot of that on DC.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DurtGurl
    Honestly, I think you moving over to the rough side and slowing down was enough. DC is a highway and there are few places on it where there is not room for 2-way traffic. Plus, the "hills" are so short and staggered that the uphill right-of-way rule often just does not apply. The washes are the only exception and most of them still have room for two riders - if not, wait for the uphill rider before you descend.

    I'm guessing that the 2nd rider decided to blow past his buddy without seeing you first and got miffed. Oh well... he should have looked ahead before bolting and held his line after he saw you. Testosterone was the likely culprit - there's a lot of that on DC.
    DG,
    It's not natural for one person to have so much sense.

  12. #12
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    I was finishing up the last 5 climbing miles of the Crazy 88 on Saturday when a rider came down Schultz in a straight section of trail where we could both see each other approaching....he saw me from way off...I saw him and gave him the 500yard stare appropriate for being on mile 82 and climbing....and he did not stop. I was forced to stop my climb and step around him as he passed...at least he slowed down. This was in the section of trail on Schultz in which the trail is entrenched about a foot down...so there was no place to pass. At the time, I was cached and did not say anything other than to flip him the bird as he rode off...he never saw it and I never intended for him to see it...just me getting some steam off my chest....what little I had left. Chollaball was behind me....I don't know if this rider gave him the same treatment...

    I've been in his shoes in the same spot on Schultz and felt the decent thing to do was stop before the climber got to me, pick my bike up out of the trench and stand aside as the climber passed. In all situations...I try my best to stop and move out of the way to let folks pass....I go out of my way to do this. On a few occasions though when I am climbing up to a blind corner and I see someone in the flow going downhill with no ability to see me and stop in time and in control, I stop my climb and get out of the way. I've always felt this to be appropriate and considerate since the uphill rider (person going downhill) has less ability to safely stop based on the rule in this specific scenario.

    In the end it's all about who has the best ability to prevent someone from losing control or losing the climb. 99 percent of the time this is the uphill riders responsibility. It sounds like in the OP's story that he had the ability to see them and stop before descending or shortly thereafter. At least the OP is putting some thought into this....we all know the rules when we start out....it just takes some practice to become instinctual




  13. #13
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmarkos
    DG,
    It's not natural for one person to have so much sense.
    Chalk it up to age and experience

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DurtGurl
    Honestly, I think you moving over to the rough side and slowing down was enough. DC is a highway and there are few places on it where there is not room for 2-way traffic. Plus, the "hills" are so short and staggered that the uphill right-of-way rule often just does not apply. The washes are the only exception and most of them still have room for two riders - if not, wait for the uphill rider before you descend.

    I'm guessing that the 2nd rider decided to blow past his buddy without seeing you first and got miffed. Oh well... he should have looked ahead before bolting and held his line after he saw you. Testosterone was the likely culprit - there's a lot of that on DC.
    I am going to agree with DG! But I am going to ask a question, the second rider, do you think he saw you before or after he changed his line to the rough line that you moved over to? Do you think that he was trying to pass his friend?

    I honestly would have done the same thing as you did, you yielded the good line when there was enough room for 2 way trafic by him jumpng over to the rough line it seems like he wanted to be inconsiderate and flex his "you must always stop for uphill trafic muscles". I wish that people understood that "Yield" does not mean stop it means that you have to give way or adjust your speed or direction for the other.

  15. #15
    A plethora of pinatas
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzSpeedfreek
    I am going to agree with DG! But I am going to ask a question, the second rider, do you think he saw you before or after he changed his line to the rough line that you moved over to? Do you think that he was trying to pass his friend?

    I honestly would have done the same thing as you did, you yielded the good line when there was enough room for 2 way trafic by him jumpng over to the rough line it seems like he wanted to be inconsiderate and flex his "you must always stop for uphill trafic muscles". I wish that people understood that "Yield" does not mean stop it means that you have to give way or adjust your speed or direction for the other.
    I too agree with DG and SF on this one.
    Marty

  16. #16
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    I ride DC a fair amount and always thought (wrong or right) that if your in a wash the opposing rider should wait for you to exit the wash before entering. I always use the stay to right rule as well. Obviously this doesnt always work and im sure I have done the same as the OP before. I had the same thing happen to me on Saturday, but I was the rider coming up the wash and had someone not pause and force me to pull over and brake at the start of the climb out, not so fun on the SS, but I did refrain from the f-bomb, although I felt like going back and politely informing him of the Britmtnbiker rules of DC

  17. #17
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    DG put it the way i see it, i did yield, as in slow down, gave the uphill the good line. i feel it everyoneís responsibility to look ahead when riding, if you are going to pass someone you look to make sure its clear, or at least i hope so. i guess sht happens and im cool with that. i just dont like that i said sorry, when i feel we were both at fault in our own ways, and he calls me a Fin idiot. where the rider comradely.

  18. #18
    I'm with stupid -------->
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    Quote Originally Posted by BritMtnBiker
    I ride DC a fair amount and always thought (wrong or right) that if your in a wash the opposing rider should wait for you to exit the wash before entering. I always use the stay to right rule as well. Obviously this doesnt always work and im sure I have done the same as the OP before. I had the same thing happen to me on Saturday, but I was the rider coming up the wash and had someone not pause and force me to pull over and brake at the start of the climb out, not so fun on the SS, but I did refrain from the f-bomb, although I felt like going back and politely informing him of the Britmtnbiker rules of DC
    I agree, if somebody is already in the wash you let them out before you drop in. However, this typically coincides with the uphill rule. It just adds in the fact, the first in (even if both are on downhill) has right of way.

  19. #19
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    to make it clear, the wash well, was hardly a wash, it was more like a slight 5 foot elivation change so, up and down section coming around a corner for the coming rider. and for me it was a long gradual downhill ending at this corner. if that makes any sense. it wasnt one of the 15-20 foot drop down into then out washes that you picture when you think of dc.

  20. #20
    Just Joshin' ya!
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    Stang,

    The dude is obviously an a**hole who wants to spread his misery. You yielded the trail for the most part and even if you didn't completely yield, there is no excuse to call someone a f***ing idiot for a trivial little mountain bike ride. My solution when something like this happens is to try to be as polite and courteous to everyone I see afterward. This spreads good vibes all around, makes you feel generally positive, and helps you to forget the jerk who woke and had carnation instant di**head for breakfast.

    Peace!
    Last edited by PrincipalRider; 08-10-2009 at 08:18 PM.
    Getting a dropper post is like getting a bidet. I didn't know I needed one until I get one and boy, does my ass thank me.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88mustanggt
    to make it clear, the wash well, was hardly a wash, it was more like a slight 5 foot elivation change so, up and down section coming around a corner for the coming rider. and for me it was a long gradual downhill ending at this corner. if that makes any sense. it wasnt one of the 15-20 foot drop down into then out washes that you picture when you think of dc.
    OH I think we need pictures!!!

    That has makes the f-bomb less valid then!! I always go off-trail to aid the other rider either up or down to try and maintain my flow and keep the other rider from stopping as well.

    This reminds me of a couple of years ago I was going down the "techy" descent at the end of the classic just past the goat trail to helipad. A group of riders girls and guys were coming up and I saw some not cleaning the climb and were walking. I kept going and stayed on the rough stuff of the line, but a girl was coming up being cheered on by the guys and I slowed and stayed off to left but instead of following the line she headed straight for me and ended having to dab. I kept going with a sorry, but got some nice comments from the guys. Still feel bad about that one!!

  22. #22
    Meatbomb
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    Elbows people.... we all have 2 of them , use 'em.

  23. #23
    I'm Lazy, So I Shuttle
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    Next time stop throw ur bike at him and tell him to F off!
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.- Julie Furtado

  24. #24
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    thanks guys, you made me feel better about the situation. i just wanted to make sure i wasnt 100% in the wrong here, and a flipin idiot.

    i dont see how anyone could be mean or in a bad mood when on the trail, cant think of many things that make me happyer to be alive.

  25. #25
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    you did just fine 88 ! that guy is a trouble maker who can't control his anger. from your story you did the best you could, and nearly threw yourself under the bus to yield. i too have had several of these on DC. not all people are pleasant. just keep trying to follow the uphill rule and other trail etiquette and ride again!
    no matter how courteous you are, sooner or later we all run into surprises.
    RAM speed: UP, UP, and away....!

  26. #26
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    No contact, no problem - forget about it.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88mustanggt
    thanks for the input guys , i wasnt out of control, but i guess i should of just stopped. it just suprised me when guy number 2 pulled out of from behind guy 1 after i had passed guy 1 safely.

    i guess im still trying to fegure this all out, there has been countless times when i was climbing a slowsih grind and people going down it dont stop, they slow down and go off the "main line" to pass and continue on there way. are they all supose to stop?
    Probably better for the downhill rider to stop so that we don't all widen the trail and kill all of the pretty flowers and bust the cryptobiotic crust but certainly not required.
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
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  28. #28
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    I think you should have kept to the right and slowed down. If there is room on the trail for both of you one rider is going to have to ride in the rocky part. It doesn't have to be you. If you did this and got called an idiot an F off would be justified.

  29. #29
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    I have been finding that the trail etiquette on DC lately has been lacking. Chalk it up to lack of experience, heat impairment or just plain rude, but, I have almost been knocked off my bike a few times over the last few weeks by people blasting down the trail, when I know they saw me. Just last weekend while out on my SingleSpeed's maiden voyage getting to learn the ins and outs of a gearless bike, I was on my way along the "secret trail" portion of DC going uphill in a technical section when this dude blasts down and almost knocks me over. I said nothing but continued, only to be treated to another near miss by a lady biker that was all over the trail in one of the really rocky/gravely sections after the water tanks, heading towards the foothills. This section is close to double track so there is more than enough room for two riders. Well she was all over the place and almost ran right into me. I ended up coming out of my pedals and caught myself on the top tube of the bike. The lady kept riding and did not even check to see if I was ok Whenever I find myself making a stupid mistake, I always apologize and 98% of the time, people are cool. But when someone pulls something on me, its like I'm in the wrong. To the OP don't worry about it, mistakes happen. The fact that he started cussing at you makes him a jack a$$.

  30. #30
    Ride 'Til Your Knees Hurt
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    Let me clear up some of the mystery regarding this post... I was the #2 rider in this scenario. No, I wasn't trying to pass up rider #1. I went to the right because that's what you do in this situation. If there is on-coming traffic you don't go to the left, you go to YOUR right. I can't speak for rider #1 as to why he went left. And I don't think I should have to follow his line. I did what I would always do in this type of situation, went to the right. Testosterone wasn't the culprit here. To the OP, I apologize for the name calling. Regardless of the situation that wasn't appropriate. It was disrespectful... There are many racer-types that never slow down because it messes up their "training". I assumed the OP was part of that crowd. My bad... Again, I apologize to the OP. Still I think for me to take the right line was the safest move. I always look to the right for a bail-out in these types of situations.

  31. #31
    sprocket
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycljunkie
    Let me clear up some of the mystery regarding this post... I was the #2 rider in this scenario. No, I wasn't trying to pass up rider #1. I went to the right because that's what you do in this situation. If there is on-coming traffic you don't go to the left, you go to YOUR right. I can't speak for rider #1 as to why he went left. And I don't think I should have to follow his line. I did what I would always do in this type of situation, went to the right. Testosterone wasn't the culprit here. To the OP, I apologize for the name calling. Regardless of the situation that wasn't appropriate. It was disrespectful... There are many racer-types that never slow down because it messes up their "training". I assumed the OP was part of that crowd. My bad... Again, I apologize to the OP. Still I think for me to take the right line was the safest move. I always look to the right for a bail-out in these types of situations.
    sometimes the left is more conservative than the right.

  32. #32
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    cyclijunkie its all good, and like i said when it happened, im sorry. It was kinda like a 2 second sht storm, i slowed down first one goes right(think to myself ok enough room to go left) 2nd goes left, AHHH its a human slalom coarse!!!

  33. #33
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    I agree with the poster, the whole left side-right side traffic rules are confusing when one line of the trail is clearly the Best line. In the case where there is room for both of you, do I yield the proper *side* of the trail, or the best line?? I take it on a case by case basis....
    I typically yield altogether and just stop, then I typically have think to myself "fock you very much" when I get no thanks whatsoever for my polite stoppage. It's rough out there.

  34. #34
    jimfab
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    dont sweat it

    I would not give it much thought man, Just trust in karma. No matter who has the "right of way" ( sounds like you were both going down hill into the wash anyway). We all need to just work together, there is no need for yelling at one another. The other rider sounds like a real DB. What did he think the trail was going to be like? Was he mad that he went to a busy trail at a busy time on a hammerfest and there were others on the trail? Or is he so vein that he thinks that slowing down for 1/2 seconds or taking the "easy line" will effect his race season? Or is he just a major DB that has lost contact with the spirit of mountain biking? i think the last statement is most correct. I am sorry on behalf of all mountain bikers that there are folks out there like that.

    cheers

  35. #35
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  36. #36
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    Yes, everyone should follow the right of way, but maybe the cursing princess should remember most of us ride for FUN and that rider coming your way might be new to the sport or have a different interpretation of the rules. It's not that hard to get an opinion across politely Iíll take a trail hog over a mouthy coward any day.

  37. #37
    I am Walt
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    Quote Originally Posted by jimfab
    I would not give it much thought man, Just trust in karma. No matter who has the "right of way" ( sounds like you were both going down hill into the wash anyway). We all need to just work together, there is no need for yelling at one another. The other rider sounds like a real DB. What did he think the trail was going to be like? Was he mad that he went to a busy trail at a busy time on a hammerfest and there were others on the trail? Or is he so vein that he thinks that slowing down for 1/2 seconds or taking the "easy line" will effect his race season? Or is he just a major DB that has lost contact with the spirit of mountain biking? i think the last statement is most correct. I am sorry on behalf of all mountain bikers that there are folks out there like that.

    cheers
    Quote Originally Posted by 20sixx
    Yes, everyone should follow the right of way, but maybe the cursing princess should remember most of us ride for FUN and that rider coming your way might be new to the sport or have a different interpretation of the rules. It's not that hard to get an opinion across politely Iíll take a trail hog over a mouthy coward any day.
    Wow...easy there, guys. I know cycljunkie, the rider who was riding up, and he's about as chill and non-hammerhead a guy as you'll run into out there. And he posted here that it was him, explained his side, and apologized for his words. So debate the concept here, but stop ripping the guy.
    Ride more; post less...

  38. #38
    sprocket
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    Wow...easy there, guys. I know cycljunkie, the rider who was riding up, and he's about as chill and non-hammerhead a guy as you'll run into out there. And he posted here that it was him, explained his side, and apologized for his words. So debate the concept here, but stop ripping the guy.

    it makes me feel good when people get angry at each other. it confirms many things.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by cycljunkie
    Let me clear up some of the mystery regarding this post... I was the #2 rider in this scenario. No, I wasn't trying to pass up rider #1. I went to the right because that's what you do in this situation. If there is on-coming traffic you don't go to the left, you go to YOUR right.
    I'm curious about this statement, as I'm not sure I totally agree. About two months ago, I had a similar situation: I was climbing a pretty wide fireroad, so there was no need for the descending rider to wait. However, the trail was loose, and the hardpacked stuff was on the left of the trail, so I took that route. I held my ground, and as the descending rider approached, he kept to his far right. He finally moved, and yelled "I can't get over any farther right." I'm not sure I was obligated to get to the far right, and have never heard of this "rule."

    From the sounds of this, if there were two riders climbing, and one descending, and the descending rider felt there was enough room, I think it was your responsibility to follow rider #1's line, even if was on the wrong side of the trail, according to your "rule."
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  40. #40
    I'm with stupid -------->
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    Hummm....

    I always yield the best line to the uphill rider as well. If there is not clear "best line" or if there are two good lines I will then go right. Am I wrong here as well?

    I got pushed into a rock garden a few weeks back when the downhill right pushed me off the best line (which was on my left). I thought it wasn't cool of him but maybe it was me that wasn't cool and forced a game of chicken (that I lost).

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    Wow...easy there, guys. I know cycljunkie, the rider who was riding up, and he's about as chill and non-hammerhead a guy as you'll run into out there. And he posted here that it was him, explained his side, and apologized for his words. So debate the concept here, but stop ripping the guy.
    +1.
    Cycljunkie is a cool dude, who would never deliberately force a bad situation on a trail. Let it go.
    "People do not lack strength; they lack will" (Victor Hugo)

  42. #42
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    This applies to single track or wide track:
    I see it as the up hill rider should be able to maintain the line that will allow him/her to continue their climb weather it is on the right or left. The down hill rider if they wish to continue should take the line that may be rough or loose.

    This applies to double track/fire road:
    Treat it like a road each rider should stay on or to their right unless it will cause them to fall off into a wash, gulch, or cliff in which case the up hill rider may have to pause or slow for a moment in the interest of safety.

  43. #43
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    Cycljunkie,

    I give you credit for owning up to the situation and appologizing for you actions, that is very adult and responsible of you. Maybe some others can see that as an example and sign to grow up.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88mustanggt
    thanks guys, you made me feel better about the situation. i just wanted to make sure i wasnt 100% in the wrong here, and a flipin idiot.

    i dont see how anyone could be mean or in a bad mood when on the trail, cant think of many things that make me happyer to be alive.
    I understand what you mean. When I ride, I can't stop smiling (or grimacing- heh), but some people use their time on the trails to work out their bad day, or aggression, or they just simply take themselves very, very seriously. In this case, I can tell you that the guy who cussed at you, is none of the above, does none of the above, and probably just had a moment of frustration. And I'd venture to guess that it's the asswipe type of rider that I named above, who have created some of that frustration. Believe me, I have learned, especially being a chick on a bike (thus summarily treated with disregard by the more machismo type), to hold my line aggressively (but not at the cost of anyone getting hurt), and to USE MY VOICE to communicate my intentions. More than once, I've had to shout at somebody to YIELD. Too often, people get out there and expect others to "divine" their intention. Use your voice, and if that doesn't work, as somebody suggested, use your elbows. Trail rage ain't much different than road rage, so just.... choose your battles, and above ALL, keep it fun. Don't let anything or anyone ruin your good time out there.
    "People do not lack strength; they lack will" (Victor Hugo)

  45. #45
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    According to IMBA's guidelines , there is nothing about the having to yield to the right or left. I feel that if there is room for 2 riders to pass, the downhill rider should yield the best part of the trail to the uphill rider.

    http://www.imba.com > about > trail_rules.html

    Rules of the Trail
    Subscribe to IMBA eNews

    These guidelines for trail behavior are recognized around the world. IMBA developed the "Rules of the Trail" to promote responsible and courteous conduct on shared-use trails. Keep in mind that conventions for yielding and passing may vary, depending on traffic conditions and the intended use of the trail.

    1. Ride On Open Trails Only
    Respect trail and road closures -- ask a land manager for clarification if you are uncertain about the status of a trail. Do not trespass on private land. Obtain permits or other authorization as may be required. Be aware that bicycles are not permitted in areas protected as state or federal Wilderness.

    2. Leave No Trace
    Be sensitive to the dirt beneath you. Wet and muddy trails are more vulnerable to damage than dry ones. When the trail is soft, consider other riding options. This also means staying on existing trails and not creating new ones. Don't cut switchbacks. Be sure to pack out at least as much as you pack in.

    3. Control Your Bicycle
    Inattention for even a moment could put yourself and others at risk. Obey all bicycle speed regulations and recommendations, and ride within your limits.

    4. Yield to Others
    Do your utmost to let your fellow trail users know you're coming -- a friendly greeting or bell ring are good methods. Try to anticipate other trail users as you ride around corners. Bicyclists should yield to all other trail users, unless the trail is clearly signed for bike-only travel. Bicyclists traveling downhill should yield to ones headed uphill, unless the trail is clearly signed for one-way or downhill-only traffic. Strive to make each pass a safe and courteous one.
    5. Never Scare Animals
    Animals are easily startled by an unannounced approach, a sudden movement or a loud noise. Give animals enough room and time to adjust to you. When passing horses, use special care and follow directions from the horseback riders (ask if uncertain). Running cattle and disturbing wildlife are serious offenses.

    6. Plan Ahead
    Know your equipment, your ability and the area in which you are riding -- and prepare accordingly. Strive to be self-sufficient: keep your equipment in good repair and carry necessary supplies for changes in weather or other conditions. Always wear a helmet and appropriate safety gear.
    Marty

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzSpeedfreek
    Cycljunkie,

    I give you credit for owning up to the situation and appologizing for you actions, that is very adult and responsible of you. Maybe some others can see that as an example and sign to grow up.

    Have you confused MTBR with some other reality?

  47. #47
    jimfab
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    You are right!

    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    Wow...easy there, guys. I know cycljunkie, the rider who was riding up, and he's about as chill and non-hammerhead a guy as you'll run into out there. And he posted here that it was him, explained his side, and apologized for his words. So debate the concept here, but stop ripping the guy.
    Hey, You are right! I am sure he is a very nice guy, it is rare to find folks on bikes that are actually DB's. But this is a good example that we can all learn from, because at some point we have all felt the emotions involved in both sides of this dispute. Weather we were new to biking or if we have ben around a while. I still remember a similar incident that happened to me almost 20 years ago, it really discouraged me for a while and it took meeting many cool folks to change my opinion of the mountain bike crowd. Try to remember when you discovered the true spirit of mountain biking. It is very easy to caught up in taking this sport too serious, we will all do it at some point if we ride long enough. This is why it is good to read about things like this every now and again, hopefully it will bring us all down a notch or two. For the folks that have ben around a while try to make a point of helping out the new folks that have not yet discovered the true joys of mountain biking and lead by example. Just try to remember that we are all out for the same reason, some are slow, some are fast but we are all there to have fun, get a workout, and commune with nature and friends.

    Cheers

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by tpvet73
    Have you confused MTBR with some other reality?

    Other Reality? I don't even know what reality is any more .

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by yetisurly
    it makes me feel good when people get angry at each other. it confirms many things.

    we are all somebodys doucebag..?

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    we are all somebodys doucebag..?
    "We are all part of the same compost heap."
    Marty

  51. #51
    Ride 'Til Your Knees Hurt
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20sixx
    Iíll take a trail hog over a mouthy coward any day.
    At least I do my name calling in person. You on the other hand hide behind your computer. Who is the real coward?

  52. #52
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    i find that staying heads-up and alert, and communication like coyoteKis said earlier has saved me from a lot of close ones. the truth is i see a lot of oncoming people before they ever see me, because i practice scanning the horizon. i've had success with hand signals also, such as pointing to the side of the trail i plan on taking. if we decide before we ride, to have a good time, it's way easier to deal with whatever happens. FUN on!
    RAM speed: UP, UP, and away....!

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    Wow...easy there, guys. I know cycljunkie, the rider who was riding up, and he's about as chill and non-hammerhead a guy as you'll run into out there. And he posted here that it was him, explained his side, and apologized for his words. So debate the concept here, but stop ripping the guy.
    You are absolutely right waltaz. Sorry cycljunkie, I think when I originally read the post I lumped you in with every rider that wasn't friendly on the trail regardless of the situation. What has already been cleared up between the riders will continue on in forum land for weeks

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by 20sixx
    Sorry cycljunkie
    No worries...

  55. #55
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    Time To REALLY Clear Things Up!

    I was rider #1. I went to the left because that is the line I wanted to take as the rider holding right-of-way rights. Unfortunately, the night before this ride I consumed a large Italian syle sandwich composed of an entire tin of sardines, sweet and hot roasted peppers, Provalone, coppa, Prosciutto di Parma, Soppressata and dressing. One of the items in the sandwich, perhaps more, did not agree with me. To that end, or rather my end, I was full of smelly digestive gas all day. Thus, Cycljunkie moved to the right for what are now obvious reasons. His tirade of F'bombs were directed at me, not the other rider. Cycljunkie's statements herein are an attempt to shield me from extreme embarrassment.
    I AM JUST A JERK

  56. #56
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    I would just blame the singlespeeder(s) in all situations possible...

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    I was rider #1... To that end, or rather my end, I was full of smelly digestive gas all day. Thus, Cycljunkie moved to the right for what are now obvious reasons. His tirade of F'bombs were directed at me, not the other rider. Cycljunkie's statements herein are an attempt to shield me from extreme embarrassment.
    So there WAS a 2nd shooter - and a gassy hole!
    "Nobody ever told me not to try" - Curious George Soundtrack by Jack Johnson

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