Well, that blows- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Well, that blows

    I had just finished climbing Mormon, reconnected with National, and was zipping through the huge boulders on my way to the really fun parts of National when my front tire blew on Sunday afternoon. A loud exploding noise from one of your wheels can be quite shocking when you're riding. I guess I should feel lucky I didn't go over the bars into an ocotillo.

    A super-nice dude named Brandon stopped, macgyvered the rip in my tire with a Gu packet, and pumped up my spare tube so I could make it back down the mountain. That patch was really impressive. It's a nice feeling for us noobs that there are so many helpful bikers out there. I don't know if Brandon is a member of this forum, but if you are, thanks again.

    Check out the gash in this tire! Is a rip like that common on SoMo? Any ideas what causes something like that... the sharp edge of a rock? Cheap tires? Tire pressure? (I'm running 38-40) Did I just pick the wrong line?
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  2. #2
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
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    SWEET!

    Yesterday I was out doing a mach9 descent down 7 mile gulch, got almost right to the bottom and put a gash in my WTB weirwolf (new) that looks almost exactly the same! The only difference is my gash looks very "clean", as if done by a razor. Mine looks actually a little longer.

    I stuffed some wrappers and stuff in the tire, put a 29er tube in the 26" tire (don't let anyone tell you it doesn't work), and rode back on the road to my car.

    To fix this, I usually sew it up with some thread, and then install a patch on the inside, although I sometimes use some flexible epoxy or glue as well.

    You just picked the wrong line, although there are some tires that are just too thin for places like south mountain. I find this to be especially true with some of the "high volume" tires; to keep them light they resort to making the sidewalls VERY thin.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  3. #3
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    Is that a 29er wheel?

    I just look at Bontrager tires and they sidewall.

    I would try different tires.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKA Monkeybutt
    Is that a 29er wheel?

    I just look at Bontrager tires and they sidewall.

    I would try different tires.
    Nah, it's a 26.

    They're the tires that came with the bike. I stopped by my LBS on the way home and asked for better tires. I'm confused about why he sold me a tubeless tire. I don't have tubeless wheels.

  5. #5
    Dave
    Reputation: liteandfast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by crispy
    Nah, it's a 26.

    They're the tires that came with the bike. I stopped by my LBS on the way home and asked for better tires. I'm confused about why he sold me a tubeless tire. I don't have tubeless wheels.
    UST tires have a thicker sidewall so that this type of tear may be less prone to happen. Or he just wanted to get more money from you. Just chalk it up to mountain biking man, tires are one of the disposible items like, tubes, helmets, spokes, chains, pedals, ...well you get the idea. Take care of the frame and you'll have it for a long time.

    UST tires are heavier then non UST tires. Just patch it up (like Jayem does) and keep it as a spare or take back the UST tire.

    Dave
    I need to ride more and work less.

  6. #6
    parenting for gnarness
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    i've added a slice of a milk jug to my pack in case this happens - about 1.5'' x 3''. the plastic's curves are about the same as the curve of the tire, and it weighs nothing.
    YES to Scottsdale Prop 420
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by liteandfast
    UST tires have a thicker sidewall so that this type of tear may be less prone to happen. Or he just wanted to get more money from you. Just chalk it up to mountain biking man, tires are one of the disposible items like, tubes, helmets, spokes, chains, pedals, ...well you get the idea. Take care of the frame and you'll have it for a long time.

    UST tires are heavier then non UST tires. Just patch it up (like Jayem does) and keep it as a spare or take back the UST tire.

    Dave
    So I can put a tube in a tubeless tire like I would with a non-tubeless? That seems counter-intuitive... but I guess it all makes sense now if the sidewalls are thicker.

    Good suggestion on patching up the old tire to keep as a spare. I was gonna throw it out.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball
    i've added a slice of a milk jug to my pack in case this happens - about 1.5'' x 3''. the plastic's curves are about the same as the curve of the tire, and it weighs nothing.
    That's an excellent idea! I've had 3 sidewall tears in the last few months, mainly with very thin walled Specialized tubeless ready tires. The last tear was at T100 and I didn't have anything to use for a boot, so I took off a sock and used that. It worked quite well too!! My girlfriend had a good laugh when I got home and she could see the red fuzz sticking out the side of my tire.

    I'm going to cut up a milk carton this afternoon. I never thought of that, but it's an awesome idea!!

  9. #9
    Pivotal figure
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    I run tubeless tires with tubes all the time now. The extra sidewall really helps for pinch flats without needing to run a full DH size tire.
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  10. #10
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    hmmm. I may go that route too. I hate pinch flats.

  11. #11
    I'm Lazy, So I Shuttle
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    yep havent had a pinch flat since I have been riding Maxxis. knock on wood
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.- Julie Furtado

  12. #12
    Wait, what!?
    Reputation: Enduroblood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greffster
    yep havent had a pinch flat since I have been riding Maxxis. knock on wood

    Havent had one of those since I went tubeless! Sorry, but someone had to bring it up, haha.

    I carry a tube with me as well, because the super thin ones dont take up much room in my bag, and some of my riding buddies still run tubes and often forget spares. The milk jug idea is genius!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greffster
    yep havent had a pinch flat since I have been riding Maxxis. knock on wood
    With tubes? I run Maxxis as well. though my rear tire is a high roller 26x2.10 I probably should go 2.35 in the rear as I'm on the bigger end at 210.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greffster
    yep havent had a pinch flat since I have been riding Maxxis. knock on wood
    Maxxis Ignitor is what he sold me. Damn, was it a ***** to thread on the wheel! But it sho' look purty on my bike.

  15. #15
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    Reputation: brianc's Avatar
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    When I first moved to PHX i was averaging 6 rides per tire. all sidewall cuts. I have to run high pressure (40-42 psi rear) to avoid pinch flats with 2.1" tires. this causes the sidewalls to become a problem. especially since I'm not a smooth rider.

    my solution was to switch to tubless tires. although I still run a tub. why....I hate the mess. now that I ahve a bike that I can run big 2.3" in the back I've not observed the need for tubless tires.

    This can be very frustrating.
    b

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