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  1. #1
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    Trail Etiquette Question

    If two mountain bikers riding on single track approach each other on a hill, who has the right of way?

    I was of the impression it was the biker heading up hill who had the right of way, similar to hikers approaching each other on hill.

    Yesterday, while riding in the Sonoran Preserve, when climbing one of the the steepest sections, I was run off the trail by a descending mountain biker. Needless to say, I didn't clean that section.

    I try really hard not to be confrontational while riding, but this time I couldn't help myself. As the rider rode off down the hill, and as I was standing beside the trail, in the most exasperated voice possible I said: "thanks a lot".

    He said: "You're welcome"; and he kept riding.

    This was the worst experience of this type that I have had, but I've had other instances that are similar where the down hill rider will keep riding in the preferred track and expect me to get out of the way.

    Seriously, I have more problems with other mountain bikers when I'm riding than hikers.

  2. #2
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    Biker going uphill has right-of-way. I yield to everyone in every situation since I'm often riding alone and its easy for me to get out of the way, especially if its a group coming the other way. Karma

    Edit: common courtesy/respect/etiquette is not as common as it should be

  3. #3
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    You are correct and he was a dick. Dont let it ruin the ride.

  4. #4
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    DH yields to Uphill... and yeah, some just don't get it. I typically just hold my line and take the best line for me....and keep my elbows out.
    Now, it always gets a little gray when the trail is like Browns Ranch where its rolling ups and downs, but at Sonoran with long climbs it's pretty cut and dry.

    Assuming you log your stuff on strava, do the flyby and see if you can ID the guy. Then leave him a nice reminder of the etiquette on his ride comments.

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    Depends for me. While yes, the downhiller should yield. In many example, that just isn't possible. How often have you been going fast, but controllable for the conditions then around a large radius curve is a climber. Can you realistically slow down and come to a stop to allow the rider to continue up on their merry way? By time the two riders meet, the uphiller has already put down a foot while the downhiller is dragging the rear wheel to a hault.

    If I can see a rider coming up on a long straight, absolutely will slow down. In those cases I usually motion for the rider to continue on up so they do not inadvertently stop.

    I think it is a case by case basis, depending on visibility and or conditions. I have one trail in particular here that is super chunk -trying to stop on that thing seems like it will result in some type of injury or side wall gash. I'm fearful now as runners have been discovering these trails. I too am a runner and know how I would react as a runner, especially since I know the type of downhill aggression required to 'flow' through the chunk. I would absolutely be moving aside as a runner, no questions asked regardless of my direction of travel.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    ow often have you been going fast, but controllable for the conditions then around a large radius curve is a climber. Can you realistically slow down and come to a stop to allow the rider to continue up on their merry way?
    Then you weren't controllable for the conditions. It's very simple. Find a directional trail if it's that big of a deal for you.

    That's the whole point about sight lines/radius, you don't ride like an a$$ because you don't know what is around the corner, it could be some old lady barely moving forward. That's why the DH rider must always be in control, carrying that much speed you have the ability to seriously maim or even kill people.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    DH yields to Uphill... and yeah, some just don't get it. I typically just hold my line and take the best line for me....and keep my elbows out.
    Now, it always gets a little gray when the trail is like Browns Ranch where its rolling ups and downs, but at Sonoran with long climbs it's pretty cut and dry.

    Assuming you log your stuff on strava, do the flyby and see if you can ID the guy. Then leave him a nice reminder of the etiquette on his ride comments.
    ^^This


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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Then you weren't controllable for the conditions. It's very simple. Find a directional trail if it's that big of a deal for you.

    That's the whole point about sight lines/radius, you don't ride like an a$$ because you don't know what is around the corner, it could be some old lady barely moving forward. That's why the DH rider must always be in control, carrying that much speed you have the ability to seriously maim or even kill people.
    ^^And this. Combine Raybum’s and Jayem’s posts, and you have it.


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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by myt1 View Post
    If two mountain bikers riding on single track approach each other on a hill, who has the right of way?

    I was of the impression it was the biker heading up hill who had the right of way, similar to hikers approaching each other on hill.

    Yesterday, while riding in the Sonoran Preserve, when climbing one of the the steepest sections, I was run off the trail by a descending mountain biker. Needless to say, I didn't clean that section.

    I try really hard not to be confrontational while riding, but this time I couldn't help myself. As the rider rode off down the hill, and as I was standing beside the trail, in the most exasperated voice possible I said: "thanks a lot".

    He said: "You're welcome"; and he kept riding.

    This was the worst experience of this type that I have had, but I've had other instances that are similar where the down hill rider will keep riding in the preferred track and expect me to get out of the way.

    Seriously, I have more problems with other mountain bikers when I'm riding than hikers.
    Did the downhill rider yell out "STRAVA!!!" as he was approaching? If not, then I agree, he was rude.
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  10. #10
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    I yield to everyone since I'm slow and could probably use the break....

  11. #11
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    Trail etiquette: always be nice. Ignore occasional jerks.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Depends for me. While yes, the downhiller should yield. In many example, that just isn't possible. How often have you been going fast, but controllable for the conditions then around a large radius curve is a climber. Can you realistically slow down and come to a stop to allow the rider to continue up on their merry way? By time the two riders meet, the uphiller has already put down a foot while the downhiller is dragging the rear wheel to a hault.

    If I can see a rider coming up on a long straight, absolutely will slow down. In those cases I usually motion for the rider to continue on up so they do not inadvertently stop.

    I think it is a case by case basis, depending on visibility and or conditions. I have one trail in particular here that is super chunk -trying to stop on that thing seems like it will result in some type of injury or side wall gash. I'm fearful now as runners have been discovering these trails. I too am a runner and know how I would react as a runner, especially since I know the type of downhill aggression required to 'flow' through the chunk. I would absolutely be moving aside as a runner, no questions asked regardless of my direction of travel.
    Forest Rider, you had my respect until you said this.
    =sParty

    EDIT: Sorry, Forest Rider. That came off harsher than intended. I feel the way I feel about uphill/downhill ettiquette but I didn’t mean to sound like such a jerk to you. What I meant to say is please (1) always maintain control of your bike considering conditions and (2) always yield to uphill traffic. Thanks.
    Last edited by Sparticus; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:55 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    Did the downhill rider yell out "STRAVA!!!" as he was approaching? If not, then I agree, he was rude.
    I don't understand, please explain.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by myt1 View Post
    I don't understand, please explain.


    Strava runs always have the right of way.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    I yield to everyone since I'm slow and could probably use the break....
    .....................
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Depends for me. While yes, the downhiller should yield. In many example, that just isn't possible. How often have you been going fast, but controllable for the conditions then around a large radius curve is a climber. Can you realistically slow down and come to a stop to allow the rider to continue up on their merry way? By time the two riders meet, the uphiller has already put down a foot while the downhiller is dragging the rear wheel to a hault.

    If I can see a rider coming up on a long straight, absolutely will slow down. In those cases I usually motion for the rider to continue on up so they do not inadvertently stop.

    I think it is a case by case basis, depending on visibility and or conditions. I have one trail in particular here that is super chunk -trying to stop on that thing seems like it will result in some type of injury or side wall gash. I'm fearful now as runners have been discovering these trails. I too am a runner and know how I would react as a runner, especially since I know the type of downhill aggression required to 'flow' through the chunk. I would absolutely be moving aside as a runner, no questions asked regardless of my direction of travel.
    In Sedona cross country trail riding is allowed, so on those downhill situations if I am the downhill rider and I can see a good cross country line, I just take that so I don’t impede the flow of the uphill rider.

    Many times I will yield to the downhill rider because I know they would rather not stop.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by myt1 View Post
    If two mountain bikers riding on single track approach each other on a hill, who has the right of way?

    I was of the impression it was the biker heading up hill who had the right of way, similar to hikers approaching each other on hill.

    Yesterday, while riding in the Sonoran Preserve, when climbing one of the the steepest sections, I was run off the trail by a descending mountain biker. Needless to say, I didn't clean that section.

    I try really hard not to be confrontational while riding, but this time I couldn't help myself. As the rider rode off down the hill, and as I was standing beside the trail, in the most exasperated voice possible I said: "thanks a lot".

    He said: "You're welcome"; and he kept riding.

    This was the worst experience of this type that I have had, but I've had other instances that are similar where the down hill rider will keep riding in the preferred track and expect me to get out of the way.

    Seriously, I have more problems with other mountain bikers when I'm riding than hikers.
    There are a couple of dirt roadies, a man and a woman, training on the Desert Classic for the last month who are problematic. I saw them blow a grandfather and his six year old granddaughter off the trail. I waited for the little girl and old man to get back on the trail and climb out of the wash; she gave me a big smile because she knew that she mattered.

    Last week, I was climbing one of the few remaining narrow sections of the trail; they didn’t want to yield so they went around me, riding right over the wildflowers blooming alongside the trail. Not sure which is worse. Usually I’ll stop and pull over at a wide spot but they caught me by surprise because of the line of sight.

    It’s just a few bad apples out there. Most riders are pretty decent people.
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  18. #18
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    I have been riding Sonoran trail before it has grown into what it is now. Lots of bikers/hikers/poop-machines(horses) on it. Politeness is a dying trait. I have notice lots of lycra/stava riders who are rude and seem to be proud of it. Such a shame. You're on a bike on a beautiful trail; enjoy. And let others enjoy it too. I have missed a chance to yield, but always follow by a "sorry." Just be glad that you are not wound up like them.

  19. #19
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    Do all bad people on trails wear Lycra?
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  20. #20
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    No. My wife and I call them lycrans. Movie reference. Not sure what that makes us. Jealous I guess. I look like the bubble wrap from an Amazon box in lycra.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave View Post
    There are a couple of dirt roadies, a man and a woman, training on the Desert Classic for the last month who are problematic. I saw them blow a grandfather and his six year old granddaughter off the trail. I waited for the little girl and old man to get back on the trail and climb out of the wash; she gave me a big smile because she knew that she mattered.

    "Dirt roadies" literally ran an old man and a little girl off the trail and into a wash? That's incredible!

    I'm pretty non-confidential but if I saw something like that I might have chased them down and had a word with them.

    My experience with "dirt roadies" has generally been either neutral or good, even at races where there's 100's of them they almost always say please and thank you when passing.
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  22. #22
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    What are 'Dirt Roadies? Lycra clad mountain bikers?

  23. #23
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    this time of year in the deserts, you will find this BS happening more often

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    What are 'Dirt Roadies? Lycra clad mountain bikers?
    Dirt roadies wear lycra AND are completely ignorant of anyone or anything seen on the trail. In a group of two, dirt roadies ride a wheel length apart, possibly holding an inane conversation that can be heard a half mile away. Dirt roadies are only seen in the Phoenix area in winter or early spring. When stopping for a rare rest the dirt roadie will continuously look at their watch or fitness device watching their heart rate. At the trailhead dirt roadies may be identified by their Sprinter cargo vans; when they are loading or unloading their bikes you might see a huge pile of unwashed lycra on top of a makeshift bed.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz View Post
    Combine Raybum’s and Jayem’s posts, and you have it.

    Agree, good points.

    Holding the line and 'in the right' to me means I'd not suffer as much unjust displeasure due to the chance it fusses up the other's route, timing and ride section. That's the way it's supposed to work and trail etiquette backs YOU up.
    *I'll admit that's big talk from me because I'm almost always the rider taking my time, being polite and offering almost everyone R-O-W. Not out to start a p*ssing match or instigate a confrontation, I know that other rider has earned (created) the burden they "suffer" though.
    The thing is, you never really know who's the a--hole until they pull the attitude or an irresponsible / dangerous stunt.

    I'm likely to learn from other riders and seeing notice of a downhill rider/techy area, I'm more apt to call ahead for them to continue just because I might learn something.

    This here is what will get somebody hurt or killed- you don't ride like an a$$ because you don't know what is around the corner, and could easily be challenged in the legal sense as negligence. Already has, I should say.
    Last edited by bachman1961; 1 Week Ago at 03:35 PM.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave View Post
    Dirt roadies wear lycra AND are completely ignorant of anyone or anything seen on the trail. In a group of two, dirt roadies ride a wheel length apart, possibly holding an inane conversation that can be heard a half mile away. Dirt roadies are only seen in the Phoenix area in winter or early spring. When stopping for a rare rest the dirt roadie will continuously look at their watch or fitness device watching their heart rate. At the trailhead dirt roadies may be identified by their Sprinter cargo vans; when they are loading or unloading their bikes you might see a huge pile of unwashed lycra on top of a makeshift bed.
    Okay, I had to take a lot of deep slow breaths after reading that. I think I'm good now.

    So, I wear Lycra when I ride mountain bikes, also when I ride road bikes.

    Maybe I'm doin' it wrong, but whenever I tried wearing baggy short pants, apparently the apparel of choice of real mountain bikers, I always got the crotch of the shorts caught on either the tip or back of my seat when I tried to re-position myself after moving off the saddle.

    I wear Lycra because transitions on and off the saddle are so much easier.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave View Post
    Dirt roadies wear lycra AND are completely ignorant of anyone or anything seen on the trail. In a group of two, dirt roadies ride a wheel length apart, possibly holding an inane conversation that can be heard a half mile away. Dirt roadies are only seen in the Phoenix area in winter or early spring. When stopping for a rare rest the dirt roadie will continuously look at their watch or fitness device watching their heart rate. At the trailhead dirt roadies may be identified by their Sprinter cargo vans; when they are loading or unloading their bikes you might see a huge pile of unwashed lycra on top of a makeshift bed.


    I haven't heard that version, the more common definition of a "dirt roadie" is someone that has a big engine but few skills, and comes from a road biking background.

    A little jab at roadies but your definition takes it a few steps further. Nice to know that when I pull into the trailhead driving my sprinter van full of unwashed Lycra I'm being secretly judged as someone likely to run little girls and frail old men off the trail.
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  28. #28
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    "Dirt Roadies" are guys that ride road 90% of the time and then jump on their Mtn bikes and have legs and no skills. They can wear anything. A-holes are all around us have all levels of skills. Downhill yields to uphill and all DH riders need to be able to stop for any trail user. Remember however yield does not mean stop. It means taking stock of the situation and allowing the in coming trail user to pass clearly and safely. Some times that means just moving to the right. Other times that means stopping, dismounting and moving off trail. What you do depends on the trail conditions at meeting point.
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  29. #29
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    meh you can call me whatever you want.... Once I started to wear bibs, I never went back... I didn't think I would find bibs so insanely comfortable.. but they are... I dont give a rats ass what other people think about me.. .Ive always been that way lol

  30. #30
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    Be kind to all on here and the trail.
    Last edited by tomfitz; 1 Week Ago at 04:25 PM. Reason: I thought I was quoting the hikerdick

  31. #31
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    Kinda sad that we judge people for what they wear as opposed to how they act... I've been strava buzzed while hiking by all sorts of folks and also had plenty of great interactions with all sorts.
    Although I'm a strava geek and love to go fast, it gives me great pain to see guys go out to popular trails on a Sat/Sun where you know there are TONS of hikers and making fast KOM seeking runs...
    I'm always pleasantly surprised when I come up on some hikers, pull off, and say, "Hi, how are you today?"...so fun to see an angry hiker with a nasty look on their face all the sudden smile...
    Here's a terrifying thought...how many times have you come up on hikers and they instantly move off the trail so you can get by? What would have happened if in that process, they got bit by a snake? Holy fook...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Downhill yields to uphill and all DH riders need to be able to stop for any trail user. Remember however yield does not mean stop. It means taking stock of the situation and allowing the in coming trail user to pass clearly and safely. Some times that means just moving to the right. Other times that means stopping, dismounting and moving off trail. What you do depends on the trail conditions at meeting point.
    Thanks for that
    Hadn't though of it that way but very sensible.

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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    Kinda sad that we judge people for what they wear as opposed to how they act...
    Just mental laziness. People who are too lazy to actually think find it comforting to judge people on the way they look or dress or the type of bike they ride. It feels good to laugh at "those people" who look different from us. Small minds take comfort in that kind of thing.

    As has been noted, there are inconsiderate people in all groups with all different looks. The only REAL way to identify them is by their actions - not by how they look or which user group they are in.

  34. #34
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    Wear what you want. Bike what you want. Be polite and respect all. Etiquette lets everyone enjoy the trails. Just look our for the Walking Dead with headphones in both ears!

  35. #35
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    I ride for fun, not for KOM's. Stopping to let someone pass does not bother me.

    What does bother me is when approaching people step or ride to their left to let you pass as I'm moving to my right to let them pass... This is not the UK people.
    Last edited by Phillbo; 1 Week Ago at 05:10 PM.

  36. #36
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    Was at Brown's with the lady and saw this all day when climbing. I just chalk it up to being Brown's amateur hour on Sunday late afternoon so I just followed them to their cars and mugged them.
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  37. #37
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    Smash and grab....

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Do all bad people on trails wear Lycra?
    Funny you mention. I had to chase a guy down to weekend. He blew past me as I was waiting for a dad and his kids to move to the side.

    Here's the kicker: on this particular day I was in Lycra!!!!! He wasn't.

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  39. #39
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    Bibs and flannel=nicest bikers on the trail: )

  40. #40
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    The only thing that pisses me off more than this is the the dick who rides on your ass but never passes. WTF! I'm out trail riding, not picking up buddies along the way. As for trail etiquette in and around Phoenix most of the time I get the nod when ascending, but there's going to be the occasional (sometimes just unenlightened) dick who will not yield the R.O.W.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by myt1 View Post
    Okay, I had to take a lot of deep slow breaths after reading that. I think I'm good now.

    So, I wear Lycra when I ride mountain bikes, also when I ride road bikes.

    Maybe I'm doin' it wrong, but whenever I tried wearing baggy short pants, apparently the apparel of choice of real mountain bikers, I always got the crotch of the shorts caught on either the tip or back of my seat when I tried to re-position myself after moving off the saddle.

    I wear Lycra because transitions on and off the saddle are so much easier.
    To be fair to hikerdave, he was really clear to me that it was the ignorance of others that was the main problem and not the clothing. I took it as bringing the roadie mentality to the trail not just looking like a roadie.

    As for the original topic: Wear what you like. Be nice and considerate. I have no problem yielding going uphill when it makes more sense for me to stop instead of the person coming downhill. Last I checked, I think we are riding to enjoy ourselves right?

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    To be fair to hikerdave, he was really clear to me that it was the ignorance of others that was the main problem and not the clothing. I took it as bringing the roadie mentality to the trail not just looking like a roadie.


    What is "roadie mentality"?

    A) There is no such thing.


    That was my point.
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  43. #43
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    I feel 'roadie mentality' is a pack mentality.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    What is "roadie mentality"?

    A) There is no such thing.


    That was my point.
    Pretty much this. Roadie mentality is kind of a gross generalization about all roadies because of a few that act like dicks. I wonder if those that ride road bikes think there is a “mountain bike mentality,” for example, mtbkrs that run others off the trail seeking a KOM?

    A couple weeks ago I rode up to Tom Thumb’s TH. While chilling there talking with a couple hikers, a guy on a mountain bike came racing through the area right by the bathroom. He wasn’t slowing down for anyone. We all looked at each other and the consensus was the guy’s a jackass. He’s the type of rider (roadie or mtbkr) that will get us banned from certain areas.

    Just do what your mother hopefully taught you, which was be considerate of others. If we could all do just that, we probably wouldn’t need rules about who should yield.

    Bob
    "Some people follow their dreams, others hunt them down and beat them mercilessly into submission." - Neil Kendall

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountainfrog View Post
    The only thing that pisses me off more than this is the the dick who rides on your ass but never passes. WTF! I'm out trail riding, not picking up buddies along the way. As for trail etiquette in and around Phoenix most of the time I get the nod when ascending, but there's going to be the occasional (sometimes just unenlightened) dick who will not yield the R.O.W.
    ...and here I am trying to be patient A.F. and nice, just wondering when you'll tire and pull over! Nevertheless, thanks for the slow pull!




  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    To be fair to hikerdave, he was really clear to me that it was the ignorance of others that was the main problem and not the clothing. I took it as bringing the roadie mentality to the trail not just looking like a roadie.

    As for the original topic: Wear what you like. Be nice and considerate. I have no problem yielding going uphill when it makes more sense for me to stop instead of the person coming downhill. Last I checked, I think we are riding to enjoy ourselves right?
    It wasn’t the Lycra, it was the behavior towards others and lack of concern for the environment; I feel that these two users have no vested interest in keeping my local trail, DC, open to other users. In a month they’ll be off high-altitude training in Colorado; next year if the trails are closed they’ll just go someplace else.

    I chose the “dirt roadie” label because it was the most perjorative insult I could think of for that particular deplorable pair of riders.

    Next time I’ll try to find a more generic insult which is less offensive to all of the lycra wearers out on the trail.

    Still, I had fun with my re-definition of the term “Dirt Roadie”.

    Next time I’ll go with “trail narcissists”.
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave View Post

    I chose the “dirt roadie” label because it was the most perjorative insult I could think of for that particular deplorable pair of riders


    Yeah that was pretty clear, I guess I'm just against stereotyping in any form. I prefer to judge indivuals on their own merits rather than denigrate an entire group of people.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave View Post
    ...
    I chose the “dirt roadie” label because it was the most perjorative insult I could think of for that particular deplorable pair of riders....
    Just call them A-holes.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    What is "roadie mentality"?

    A) There is no such thing.


    That was my point.
    We'll have to disagree on that one. I was primarily a road rider for a long time and there is definitely a "roadie mentality" that is competitive about other riders and not friendly. I am in no way implying that all roadies display this attitude, or that the ones that do display it at all times, but it exists.

    I have lots of roadie friends and some of them have more of this attitude on the bike than others. And off the bike, a few of them are the nicest people on the planet. Road racing is all about pushing the other person to the breaking point, so it kind of makes sense I guess.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    We'll have to disagree on that one. I was primarily a road rider for a long time and there is definitely a "roadie mentality" that is competitive about other riders and not friendly. I am in no way implying that all roadies display this attitude, or that the ones that do display it at all times, but it exists.

    Of course it exists but there are plenty of unfriendly mountain bikers too. Also some doctors are unfriendly, and grocery clearks, wildlife biologists, construction workers, bowlers, golfers, shuffle board players, etc, etc, etc.


    I've been road riding most of my life and as a group they are as friendly (or unfriendly) as any other. Also plenty of roadies are not competitive in the least.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Of course it exists but there are plenty of unfriendly mountain bikers too. Also some doctors are unfriendly, and grocery clearks, wildlife biologists, construction workers, bowlers, golfers, shuffle board players, etc, etc, etc.


    I've been road riding most of my life and as a group they are as friendly (or unfriendly) as any other. Also plenty of roadies are not competitive in the least.
    Exactly my experience. I ride road, mountain, and gravel. Never could understand why different cycle groups trash each other. We have about 90% in common.

    Bob
    "Some people follow their dreams, others hunt them down and beat them mercilessly into submission." - Neil Kendall

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Trail etiquette: always be nice. Ignore occasional jerks.
    What if everyone is a jerk? Is it OK to be a jerk back at them in this case?
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawgzilla View Post
    What if everyone is a jerk? Is it OK to be a jerk back at them in this case?



    If everyone is a jerk than it's probably you.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    If everyone is a jerk than it's probably you.
    "You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to J.B. Weld again."
    =sParty
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  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Of course it exists but there are plenty of unfriendly mountain bikers too. Also some doctors are unfriendly, and grocery clearks, wildlife biologists, construction workers, bowlers, golfers, shuffle board players, etc, etc, etc.


    I've been road riding most of my life and as a group they are as friendly (or unfriendly) as any other. Also plenty of roadies are not competitive in the least.
    You seem pretty sensitive to this. I didn’t say all roadies are jerks. I didn’t even say most roadies are jerks. I said the “roadie mentality” exists. I’m not wrong. Feel free to come ask all my roadie friends. As a roadie I find it annoying too.

    I also said that most of the roadies I know are great off the bike regardless. If your a jerk on and off the bike then you’re just a jerk. If you occasionally or often show the same behavior on your road bike then you might have a roadie mentally.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    DH yields to Uphill... and yeah, some just don't get it. I typically just hold my line and take the best line for me....and keep my elbows out.
    So you block the trail with your elbows when someone is coming DH??? That is real nice "trail etiquette"! LOL

    If I am climbing and the trail is wide I will move a little and give a DHer room to pass, will always let hiker know I am coming and slow for hikers and thank them for the 2 seconds it takes out of there 2 hour hike to take 2 steps to the side to let me pass, slow down/take a shit a line for climbers and always stop/slow way down for horses.

    Trail etiquette consist of having a good attitude/demeanor and not being an azz either descending or climbing.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    I didn’t say all roadies are jerks. I didn’t even say most roadies are jerks. I said the “roadie mentality” exists.
    A tombstone fan :

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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    If everyone is a jerk than it's probably you.
    If everyone is a jerk you’re probably on the internet

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cannonball View Post
    If everyone is a jerk you’re probably on the internet
    Truth!
    Veni vidi velo!

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bituman View Post
    Exactly my experience. I ride road, mountain, and gravel. Never could understand why different cycle groups trash each other. We have about 90% in common.

    Bob
    Confession: Back when people used to organize rides on this forum, a large group of MTBRs went out on via Bush Highway to Butcher John. I think that there was only one mountain bike used on the ride, by a guy who had road tires for his full-suspension bike. The rest of us were on our road bikes.
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
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  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by myt1 View Post
    He said: "You're welcome"; and he kept riding.
    He probably has Elixirs on his bike and couldn't stop if he tried.

  62. #62
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    Too many men, too many people, making too many problems....

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Too many men, too many people, making too many problems....
    Are you suggesting there's not much LOVE to go around?
    Last edited by Train Wreck; 5 Days Ago at 08:31 AM.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Do all bad people on trails wear Lycra?

    You must spread some Reputation around before giving it to J.B. Weld again.
    Yes, especially the dog walkers.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Too many men, too many people, making too many problems....
    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    Are you suggesting there's not much left to go around?
    I am just in a land of confusion.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  66. #66
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    If two riders approach each other on a hill the one going up has right of way (ROW), unless the downhill rider (rider B) has boost spacing, unless the uphill rider (rider A) is trying for a KOM on strava. Rider B has ROW if he's got both headphones in though. Rider A trumps headphones by not wearing Lycra, which rider B can beat by using tubes. Using tubes is trumped by rider A by using tubless and cushcore, but that's trumped if rider B is on 27.5 unless rider A is on 29+. If B has a linkage fork then that gives him ROW over all of those unless A is on a rigid steel bike, but not if he has carbon fiber rims. If he has CF rims then he gets ROW unless B is on 4 piston brakes front and rear but if A has a 4 piston brake on the front then they stop and compare the number of rear cogs and the largest pizza plate with a combination punnet square payoff matrix knowing that 50t cogs are an advantageous strategy but also recessive. In the end they each stop to compare but when rider A stops it turns out he's a horse, so he does get ROW after all.

    Anyway, it's pretty simple and most of this is on trail signage, but you can't expect people or horses to act on it all the time.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountainfrog View Post
    The only thing that pisses me off more than this is the the dick who rides on your ass but never passes. WTF! I'm out trail riding, not picking up buddies along the way. As for trail etiquette in and around Phoenix most of the time I get the nod when ascending, but there's going to be the occasional (sometimes just unenlightened) dick who will not yield the R.O.W.
    I don't like a dick on my ass either. Also when I'm out riding, I'm not there to pick up buddies. You lost me on the dicks yielding to you unless it was a typo and meant that you get the "nob" when ascending. Thanks for the info about riding in the Phoenix area Mountainfrog.
    Consciousness, that annoying time between bike rides.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfinator View Post
    If two riders approach each other on a hill the one going up has right of way (ROW), unless the downhill rider (rider B) has boost spacing, unless the uphill rider (rider A) is trying for a KOM on strava. Rider B has ROW if he's got both headphones in though. Rider A trumps headphones by not wearing Lycra, which rider B can beat by using tubes. Using tubes is trumped by rider A by using tubless and cushcore, but that's trumped if rider B is on 27.5 unless rider A is on 29+. If B has a linkage fork then that gives him ROW over all of those unless A is on a rigid steel bike, but not if he has carbon fiber rims. If he has CF rims then he gets ROW unless B is on 4 piston brakes front and rear but if A has a 4 piston brake on the front then they stop and compare the number of rear cogs and the largest pizza plate with a combination punnet square payoff matrix knowing that 50t cogs are an advantageous strategy but also recessive. In the end they each stop to compare but when rider A stops it turns out he's a horse, so he does get ROW after all.

    Anyway, it's pretty simple and most of this is on trail signage, but you can't expect people or horses to act on it all the time.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
    Umm... Thanks, I think I got it. Gonna print that and tape it to my bars! If I don't yield to you it's because I'm checking my notes.
    Veni vidi velo!

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    Umm... Thanks, I think I got it. Gonna print that and tape it to my bars! If I don't yield to you it's because I'm checking my notes.
    If we all simply tattooed it to our foreheads we could reference it whenever seeing a rider going the opposite direction.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by tfinator View Post
    If we all simply tattooed it to our foreheads we could reference it whenever seeing a rider going the opposite direction.

    Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
    Even better!

    lol
    Veni vidi velo!

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopaka View Post
    I don't like a dick on my ass either.
    ^^^
    This

  72. #72
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    Maybe it's been mentioned I don't know, but just wear headphones. That absolves you of pretty much all responsibilities of any sort of trail etiquette.

    And should you encounter any confrontational situations, just drop a blue bag and ride on. They'll know you mean business.

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