Tool kit recommendation?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Tool kit recommendation?

    Ok, so I've come to the realization that I've neglected maintenance on my bike for way to long. Mainly because a lack of specialty tools.

    Can anyone recommend a reasonably priced tool kit?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    There are a few ways to do this.

    Either buy a cheap tool kit and deal with occasional broken or rounded out tools.

    Or,

    Get the basic stuff at a hardware store, such as T-handle hex wrenches, sockets and driver (I recommend a "normal" sized set and one of those "micro" ones), vice grips, wrenches in commonly used sizes, and then buy the quality bike-specific tools that you'll need, such as BB tool, cassette tool, spoke wrench, flat wrenches if you have shimano hubs, pedal wrench, chain-whip, and so on.

    I don't know which one of these comes out to be cheaper, but often time people already have a lot of the necessary tools OR they can get a lot of those tools relatively easily/cheaply. Sometimes what comes in a bike-tool kit is not adequate to work on a bike because there are too many specialized bike tools, when something more general is needed.

    There are definitely differences between cheap and expensive tools, but you can also use that as an excuse to gradually "upgrade". I worked in a shop for a while and I know that while Park Tools is the standard, they don't make the best everything and there are a few areas where I prefer their competitor's tools.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  3. #3
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    I did notice that the kits seem to come with a lot of basic tools that i already have. I would actually prefer to spend money on nice tools that fit my specific components.

    Next question, Who in town stocks the most tools? Or is it easier to find what I need online?

  4. #4
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    i have most basic tools, sense i worked in an auto shop. but lacked the "bike tools" i got the basic kit from pricepoint, the sette one. best 30 bucks i spent on bike stuff. they sell the same thing at performance for a few bucks more with someone elses name on it. the quality has been surprizingly good, better than harbor freight quality.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 88mustanggt
    i have most basic tools, sense i worked in an auto shop. but lacked the "bike tools" i got the basic kit from pricepoint, the sette one. best 30 bucks i spent on bike stuff. they sell the same thing at performance for a few bucks more with someone elses name on it. the quality has been surprizingly good, better than harbor freight quality.
    A little more than 30 dollars http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/145...--21-Tools.htm perhaps it was on a really good sale either way for what you get it is a very good deal. I work on all my bikes with these tools and they have held up so far. I would also suggest in addition to that tool kit getting these tools also.

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm...8&hprice=16.98

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/146...Nut-Wrench.htm

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm...8&hprice=14.98
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  6. #6
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    If you are just working on your own bike, I would say don't buy a "kit". Look over your bike and notice what size and what type of tools do you need for the main components. You will definitely need a full range of allen wrenches, also a full range of combination wrenches is a good idea. After that I would say a ratchet with 10 - 15mm sockets, and then depending on your frame/fork/shock, whatever you need in the 17,18,20,23,26mm range. A torque wrench is a very good idea, and a set of torx wrenches for your disc brakes if you need them.

    I've come from a background of building muscle cars, so I have built up a decent set of basic tools, but I still come across the occasion where I have to buy more specific tools, especially when manufacturers change things up like bottom bracket design, or headset design. Just buy what you need as you need it.

    As far as brand goes, I have always liked Craftsman Pro (not regular Craftsman) for inexpensive tools like allen wrenches, sockets, combos, and torque wrenches. They also come with a lifetime warranty. Park tools are the industry standard for cycling specific tools, and you won't go wrong with those. I also have some Snap-On and Matco tools that have lifetime warranties, and feel the best to me, but are much more expensive. Stay away from Harbor Freight unless you want to buy something disposable that will strip all your bolts.

  7. #7
    Just Joshin' ya!
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    In addition to what has been said, one of my better purchases has been a good park tool cable cutter and using my dremel tool for cutting housing. I stopped using my needle nose pliers for cutting cables because they sometimes will cause the cables to fray.

    Another tool that has been a big help is a cable puller, but I don't think they are completely necessary.

    Finally, I have had two cheap brand chain whips for removing cassettes, and they both fell apart right away. I finally dropped the coin on a Park Tool and it works great. Don't skimp on that tool.
    Getting a dropper post is like getting a bidet. I didn't know I needed one until I get one and boy, does my ass thank me.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by NMPhi767
    ...and using my dremel tool...
    One of the most versatile tools you will ever own.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainflow
    One of the most versatile tools you will ever own.
    I know my angle grinder has come in handy on more than one occasion.

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