Tire Fix Methods - Need your input for a good info database we can use- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    Ahhh the pain....
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    Tire Fix Methods - Need your input for a good info database we can use

    Posted this over on the tires and wheels forum, but since y'all may not make it over there... trying to create a good resource to help us fix our tires! And we all know it's the weak link.
    Let's also keep the scope to tubeless fixes and keeping the fix tubeless (duh, tubes are easy, but if you're bikepacking or don't wanna burn your one tube, these could help). Also going to split these between those you can do w/o breaking the bead, and those where you would...No need to comment if what you do is already covered... if you have a modification on what has been said, feel free to talk about it.
    W/O breaking the bead (keeping the tire mounted and bead seated)
    1. Sew with curved needle and thread, ie, dental floss, or upholstery thread
    2. Regular old superglue and some dirt (if slice isn't totally cut through, can work). I've found that the dirt+superglue is really abrasion resistant on the outside of the tire.
    3. #2 plus some gorilla tape to add structure
    4. Tire bacon plugs or other material (I've used strips of mouse pad neoprene, cotton string, and even twigs I've found on the trail).


    Actually Breaking the bead (again, no solutions with tubes...)
    1. Patch inside w/ a tube patch (takes a long time to cure glue)
    2. Waterproof tape(like clear gorilla tape) < I have NOT tried this but will be experimenting since it kinda seems possible?
    3. #1 above + #1 or #2 here.


    Bring on your best fixes!

  2. #2
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    Tire Fix Methods - Need your input for a good info database we can use

    Iíve used dynaplugs.



    http://www.dynaplug.com/bicycles.html

    I know they are just expensive bacon strips. But the metal case is perfect size, always easy to find, waterproof, and so easy to insert with built in inserter. Iíve fixed some sidewall gashes using 2 or 3 plugs. Simple punctures use one plug, pump and go. Iíve put hundreds of miles on these and never seen them loose air once sealed. I started with the micro pill and eventually bought a mega pill so I would have ample plugs to fix gases. I find multiple standard plugs work better then the bigger size but have used both for bigger tears. I have not used the newer one that you can attach a co2 to the back of the inserter. Seems awesome, but donít know how you would k ow if needs one or two plugs.

    **** if you ever need to put a tube in take the old ones out! I fixed a friends flat and his next puncture put a tube in and the tip punctured the tube. Same as not taking thorn out before putting tube in. It takes 2 seconds to pull it out from inside the tire.

    The only time Iíve used a tube in the last two years is when a spoke broke and lost air through nipple hole.

  3. #3
    Hey, a Bright Shiny Thing
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    Finally a useful AZ forum thread!

    Raybum's suggestions are all very good, so I don't have much to add to them...

    -Bike "bacon" gets expensive, I buy the automotive strips in the two sizes and then cut them into thirds to put in my repair kit. I also cut up small pieces of old T shirt and keep some in my kit and some in my pocket. If you hear a leak, you can quickly stuff the t shirt piece in the gash saving you the effort of pumping more air in later. I also have the smallest, lightest pair of multi tool pliers. Those curved needles are so tiny and the pliers make it easier for me anyways.

    Dyna plugs look awesome, just never tried them.

    Way back in the day, before tubeless, we had run out of tubes/patches etc, in the middle of nowhere. We collected a ton of grass and stuffed it in the tire and rode it out. Was unorthodox, but worked well enough to get back
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  4. #4
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    Question:
    What is the required preparation to glue an internal patch on a tubeless tire?
    Does the sealant need to be left to dry after wiping away as much as possible? During the dry period, doesn't it bugger up the bead a lot with all the dried clumps of sealant?

    Good thing only folks in Arizona get flats. LOL

  5. #5
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    make sure you lube up that hole good before inserting the plug

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by RajunCajun44 View Post
    make sure you lube up that hole good before inserting the plug
    🤣😁🤣

  7. #7
    Ahhh the pain....
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Question:
    What is the required preparation to glue an internal patch on a tubeless tire?
    Does the sealant need to be left to dry after wiping away as much as possible? During the dry period, doesn't it bugger up the bead a lot with all the dried clumps of sealant?

    Good thing only folks in Arizona get flats. LOL
    I've only patched the inside of a tire casing at home (not trailside) and always just cleaned away the sealant with a dry towel, a light scoring with sandpaper, then some isopropyl alcohol.
    Never had an issue with sealant residue along the bead.

    The dynaplug things are cool, but damn they seem really over-engineered. Seems like instead of a machined brass or aluminum part, they could make them out of molded plastic.

  8. #8
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    I use a fine cloth like a bandana for a plug. I do like the inserter on the dynaplugs - needles are not big enough, nails not the right shape. The dynaplug also wont poke a hole in your hand pushing it in. Might buy a set just for the tool.
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  9. #9
    Click Click Click
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    I've only patched the inside of a tire casing at home (not trailside) and always just cleaned away the sealant with a dry towel, a light scoring with sandpaper, then some isopropyl alcohol.
    Never had an issue with sealant residue along the bead.

    The dynaplug things are cool, but damn they seem really over-engineered. Seems like instead of a machined brass or aluminum part, they could make them out of molded plastic.
    I have two tires with sidewall tears (1/4 inch or so) that are currently patched with a tube patch on the inside AND outside (Because the one on the inside was bulging out. So far it is working good. This actually got me to thinking, that a good emergency trailside fix may be to tube patch the outside of a sidewall tear, to allow you to finish the ride and not break the bead, and then tube patch the inside post ride. It really does not take the glue that long to dry, just a few minutes.
    "You either want to or you don't."

  10. #10
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    I carry duct tape wrapped around one of my inflater tubes and a pair of cheap latex gloves for any medical emergency to another person. (nothing more to think here)
    I've used the tape as a plug from the outside by cramming it into the hole and a piece of the glove covered by the tape on the inside repair. Both methods got me back and saved the weekend trip.
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    Question:
    What is the required preparation to glue an internal patch on a tubeless tire?
    Does the sealant need to be left to dry after wiping away as much as possible? During the dry period, doesn't it bugger up the bead a lot with all the dried clumps of sealant?

    Good thing only folks in Arizona get flats. LOL
    I do this only at home.

    I clean as much of the sealant off the tire as possible. Then clean with brake clean to ensure no surface residue. Then scuff. I will often hit it with a heat gun too. Really I just want to have clean surface to bond to. Then I use a radial tire patch rather than a tube patch. The radial tire patches have reinforcement so will not bulge with a big cut. Then glue and I like to use a clamp to press it together.

    Works great to save a tire.
    Joe
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    I do this only at home.

    I clean as much of the sealant off the tire as possible. Then clean with brake clean to ensure no surface residue. Then scuff. I will often hit it with a heat gun too. Really I just want to have clean surface to bond to. Then I use a radial tire patch rather than a tube patch. The radial tire patches have reinforcement so will not bulge with a big cut. Then glue and I like to use a clamp to press it together.

    Works great to save a tire.
    I just wiped it clean with a rag and used some rubbing alcohol, and applied the glue, let dry then the patch. For me the key is to not try to peel off the plastic cover on the back side of the patch, just leave that on and let if come off on its own (just like if you were patching a tube).
    "You either want to or you don't."

  13. #13
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    I've had great success and longevity with carrying a rounded piece of milk carton plastic to use for sidewall slices. The pic below is a view of a slice I got on a bikepack. I was tubeless with Stans fluid...so I threw in the patch and a tube and made it home another 45 miles later. The patch is pretty robust, does not deform (bubble out), weathers abuse quite well, holds in place through friction internal to the tube/patch interface, and is reusable.

    Tire Fix Methods - Need your input for a good info database we can use-img_8296.jpg

    I've used it enough times to feel good about it and not worry about it - which to me is worth a lot since ruining ones head-game on a long ride is difference between having fun and the fun having you. Ultimately, it's the fastest fix I can think of to get you where you need to be in once piece. I've always been intrigued by the stitching that others have done, but frankly the last thing I want to do on a long ride is not move. Being forced to sit and stitch never appealed to me....to each their own I guess.




  14. #14
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    My stitching success rate is about 50% and thus for any day ride, I've resorted to tubing it just to save time and frustration. If the cut isn't big enough to stick your finger through then tire bacon, superglue, and dirt has gotten me home.
    BTW, one thing I do bring is a small 10cc empty syringe to suck any sealant out of the tire (if it hasn't already spilled all over the desert) and inject it into my tube. Hence the reason getting tubes with removable cores is a must.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by azfishman View Post
    Way back in the day, before tubeless, we had run out of tubes/patches etc, in the middle of nowhere. We collected a ton of grass and stuffed it in the tire and rode it out. Was unorthodox, but worked well enough to get back
    I recall the article w/photos in MBA 20 years ago.

    I live in Oregon where we have plenty of trailside grass, ferns, fir needles, etc. -- plenty of tire stuffing material easily at hand. Meanwhile just days ago my GF & I returned from a 6-week snowbird trip to Arizona which leaves me with this question. Since the desert generally lacks such innocuous greenery, can you guys & gals employ cholla &/or prickly pear to stuff the tire?
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  16. #16
    EJC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    I recall the article w/photos in MBA 20 years ago.

    I live in Oregon where we have plenty of trailside grass, ferns, fir needles, etc. -- plenty of tire stuffing material easily at hand. Meanwhile just days ago my GF & I returned from a 6-week snowbird trip to Arizona which leaves me with this question. Since the desert generally lacks such innocuous greenery, can you guys & gals employ cholla &/or prickly pear to stuff the tire?
    =sParty

    Nah, we just stuff it with a rattler and ride on out...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparticus View Post
    I recall the article w/photos in MBA 20 years ago.

    I live in Oregon where we have plenty of trailside grass, ferns, fir needles, etc. -- plenty of tire stuffing material easily at hand. Meanwhile just days ago my GF & I returned from a 6-week snowbird trip to Arizona which leaves me with this question. Since the desert generally lacks such innocuous greenery, can you guys & gals employ cholla &/or prickly pear to stuff the tire?
    =sParty
    Sparty, we usually like to keep the sharp, thorny stuff on the outside of the tire, but maybe we need to change our thinking!

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