Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 100 of 235
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    122

    Threaded Schrader valve for ghetto tubeless?

    I currently have my wheels set up ghetto tubeless with gorilla tape and a tubeless presta valve stem. I remeber reading awhile back in one of the tubeless threads about a threaded schrader valve stem that someone used. It turns out its a lot harder to find one of these, Ive tried discount tire and several motorsports stores, ride now and moto city on the west side and still no luck. so anyone know where to find these, Im just looking for an easier way of putting in stans and schrader removable cores are perfect. Thanks

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cru_jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    781
    Quote Originally Posted by Olie12
    I currently have my wheels set up ghetto tubeless with gorilla tape and a tubeless presta valve stem. I remeber reading awhile back in one of the tubeless threads about a threaded schrader valve stem that someone used. It turns out its a lot harder to find one of these, Ive tried discount tire and several motorsports stores, ride now and moto city on the west side and still no luck. so anyone know where to find these, Im just looking for an easier way of putting in stans and schrader removable cores are perfect. Thanks
    Not sure what you mean. Every Schrader valve I've ever seen in my entire life can have the valve core removed with a valve core removal tool.





    https://www.notubes.com/product_info...roducts_id/327

  3. #3
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,245
    Every Schrader valve I've ever seen in my entire life can have the valve core removed with a valve core removal tool.
    I think OP means he would like to thread the schrader valve into the rim like a car rim,...I could be wrong.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 'size's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,103
    cru - pretty sure he means fully threaded on the OD so it can be locked down with a nut like a presta valve.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ggnarl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    410
    Just squeeze the tire to hold the valve in place.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,609
    I think, if I understand you correctly, there is another option.

    Instead of using the gorilla tape, get a 20" BMX tube with a shraeder valve, and cut it longitudinally to make a sealing strip with a built in shraeder valve. Seat the tire on the tube/strip and then cut off the excess tube rubber extending out from the bead. That way, you don't need threaded to hold the valve onto the rim.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Casual Observer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    9,211
    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    I think, if I understand you correctly, there is another option.

    Instead of using the gorilla tape, get a 20" BMX tube with a shraeder valve, and cut it longitudinally to make a sealing strip with a built in shraeder valve. Seat the tire on the tube/strip and then cut off the excess tube rubber extending out from the bead. That way, you don't need threaded to hold the valve onto the rim.
    I've never gone ghetto, but I've also see video of going the gorilla tape route and just cutting the shraeder valve from a tube.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cru_jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    781
    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    I think OP means he would like to thread the schrader valve into the rim like a car rim,...I could be wrong.
    I thought about that too...but since he said he wanted to be able to remove the valve cores and not the valve stem itself, I just assumed he need a valve core removal tool.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    122
    Sorry for not being more specific eatdrinkride and 'size are correct. Im looking for a schrader valve that is threaded all the way down. Just like the ones pictured but with a little rubber gasket on the bottom end just like a presta.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cru_jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    781
    Quote Originally Posted by smilinsteve
    I think, if I understand you correctly, there is another option.

    Instead of using the gorilla tape, get a 20" BMX tube with a shraeder valve, and cut it longitudinally to make a sealing strip with a built in shraeder valve. Seat the tire on the tube/strip and then cut off the excess tube rubber extending out from the bead. That way, you don't need threaded to hold the valve onto the rim.
    +1

    I've sucessfully done this on both a Vuelta and WTB rim. MANY others have done it on various other rims as well.

    But you don't HAVE to have removeable cores to put in sealant. It does make it easier and less potential for mess to do it after the beads are seated, but it's not mandatory. Just takes a little more paying attention to what you are doing to keep it from spilling out.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,609
    Quote Originally Posted by Olie12
    Sorry for not being more specific eatdrinkride and 'size are correct. Im looking for a schrader valve that is threaded all the way down. Just like the ones pictured but with a little rubber gasket on the bottom end just like a presta.
    But, as mentioned, you don't need one to do what you want to do...

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tonebone2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    178
    Why do you want the schrader as opposed to the Presta you're already using? Just for the bigger diameter making it easier to pour sealant in?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    122
    Thanks guys I know I can accomplish what I want with a bmx tube I just remember seeing one of the threaded schrader valves and thought it would be cool. Yea its all about cool factor for me not just function. My current setup has worked perfect over the last year without a problem. 'size where did you get those pictures

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Chalkpaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    633
    I've had good success in going to the various moto shops which are NOT BMW, Harley Davidson, or Ducati. Peer inside the workshop and if you see lots of dirtbikes and wheels and tires, then you have just increased your odds in getting the goods. Ghetto setup means spending as least as possible. Free valve stems are best. Go to the service desk at the end of the work day. You may want to bring along a 6-pac of something not too expensive for the guys there, since they are helping you out. Place the bag on the counter, slide it across while asking if you could get at least 2 old used moto tubes. Maybe ask for 4 if you think things are going well. If you really wanted to be true ghetto, just find the dumpster in back with old tubes in mass. Then if you score big, you could sell them here on this forum.
    Or if you want to spend money, go to Napa auto parts and they have threaded valve stems.
    There is a big difference between ripping and skidding.

  15. #15
    Pivotal figure
    Reputation: kenbentit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    6,373
    Here's where I ordered mine. The Cycle Gear by my house had the same valves but they were $8 each (!). I had to trim the gasket and only use one side but they work quite well.

    http://automotive-hardware.com/1-pie...lve-p-110.html
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  16. #16
    zul
    zul is offline
    Will Guide for Beer
    Reputation: zul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    709
    Chalk, your the man. Too freakin funny.

    Schrader is stronger and much more functional. For those that are not running with pipe tape or gorilla tape, you are missing out. Much easier set up, hassle free. Forget split tube.

    Option #1 is a moto valve for $7.
    Option #2 is a MTB Continental tube cut out.

    valves" width="549">

    Both of these have been working great.

    Good luck. Schrader all the way.
    If lovin you is wrong, I don't wanna be right

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    122
    Zul those would be exactly what I'm looking for. Any clue on where to get that moto valve. Ive called several places and no luck. I agree ultimately I'm looking for ease of use and for me the gorilla tape method has worked awesome and now I just want the security of a threaded valve just schrader

  18. #18
    Old-newbie
    Reputation: g3rG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    379
    I have been using these:
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=46838

    I have to order them from CRC, but they are exactly what I needed for my tubeless setups.

    gerG
    ...uphill uphill uphill DOWNHILL! uphill uphill uphill uphill DOWNHILL! uphill ...

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    200
    Quote Originally Posted by zul
    Chalk, your the man. Too freakin funny.

    Schrader is stronger and much more functional. For those that are not running with pipe tape or gorilla tape, you are missing out. Much easier set up, hassle free. Forget split tube.

    Option #1 is a moto valve for $7.
    Option #2 is a MTB Continental tube cut out.

    valves" width="549">

    Both of these have been working great.

    Good luck. Schrader all the way.
    I think the split tube method is under rated, I never understood why some consider it a hassle. It only took me about 2 hours to do both wheels and most of that time was getting stuff out and putting it back.

    I used 20" presta tubes with removable cores, easy to set the bead and its been bulletproof. My front tire holds air better than a tube, my rear tire only requires air about once a month, if that.

    Oh and any motorcycle shop that changes tires should have those Schrader valves, they are standard on tubes for motocross bikes, you could probably get them for free from their throw away tubes.
    "What kind of bike? I don't know, I'm not a bike scientist."

  20. #20
    120
    120 is offline
    Kicker of Elves
    Reputation: 120's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    427
    Check these?

    https://https://www.ezaccessory.com/TR501_Truck_Valve_Stem_Length_p/v1561.htm?1=1&CartID=0[/URL]

    https://www.ezaccessory.com/v/vspfil...os/V1561-2.jpg

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    44
    Sorry to ask, I've read a few threads on setting up tubeless, and I have a question that I couldn't find the answer to. I've had 5 flats in the last 2 months, so I'm getting a bit tired of buying tubes.... and want to give tubeless a chance!

    Reference: rotorburn site, tubeless for 30$ thread.

    - Presta valves: many mention to buy/get for free a 20" BMX tube to put over the rim strip to keep air in, and have a built-in valve. Great. My 26" AlexRims are built for Schraeder which are a lot skinnier. They mention it is important to drill on the inside rim part to get the valve to fit. What about the outer rim? Will pushing hard on the Presta through a hole made for a Schraeder work??? What about if I just hate it, and want to run tubes again? Am I screwed because I just drilled my wheelset?

    Is there a major cleanup required eventually? I mean, after 2-3 years of adding latex regularly, I'm sure it will build up and make the tire very heavy!!

    Thanks!

    EDIT: OK, just found out there are 20" BMX tubes with Schraeder valves out there. Still need to drill? Any YouTube videos or good websites to explain the procedure? thanks.
    Last edited by UnderWurlde; 11-29-2010 at 08:41 PM.

  22. #22
    Bloodied but Unbowed
    Reputation: DesertCrawler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by UnderWurlde
    Sorry to ask, I've read a few threads on setting up tubeless, and I have a question that I couldn't find the answer to. I've had 5 flats in the last 2 months, so I'm getting a bit tired of buying tubes.... and want to give tubeless a chance!

    Reference: rotorburn site, tubeless for 30$ thread.

    - Presta valves: many mention to buy/get for free a 20" BMX tube to put over the rim strip to keep air in, and have a built-in valve. Great. My 26" AlexRims are built for Schraeder which are a lot skinnier. They mention it is important to drill on the inside rim part to get the valve to fit. What about the outer rim? Will pushing hard on the Presta through a hole made for a Schraeder work??? What about if I just hate it, and want to run tubes again? Am I screwed because I just drilled my wheelset?

    Is there a major cleanup required eventually? I mean, after 2-3 years of adding latex regularly, I'm sure it will build up and make the tire very heavy!!

    Thanks!

    EDIT: OK, just found out there are 20" BMX tubes with Schraeder valves out there. Still need to drill? Any YouTube videos or good websites to explain the procedure? thanks.
    You may have that backwards. Presta is skinny. Schraeder is bigger than Presta. If you have Presta and want Schrader and your Presta rims really are Presta sized and not simply reduced with a redcuer, yes, careful drilling will make the hole bigger. You can run either tube whenever you wish. Again, the reducer is required for the Presta in a Schrader sized hole, but why not then just run Schrader and be done with it I suppose. I prefer Presta, but my last bike had one of each so I guess I don't really care.

    20" tubes can be had with Schrader or Presta valves. I bought my Presta stemmed 20" tubes locally.

    Reducers are readily available to put a Presta valve stem into a Schrader valve-sized hole -- no worries there. If you have rims drilled for Schrader valves you can use either type so long as you have the reducer.

    Using the 20" precludes the Stan's or sealant of choice from getting onto the rim, pretty much. Maybe not so much using the Gorilla tape approach. Either way, the stuff will clean up so this should not be considered a concern.

    Finally, no need for a removable core to add sealant. A simple syringe works great. I use a syringe intended for mixing 2-stroke oil with fuel. The first time I did it I just dumped the stuff in using the cap. After seating the bead, break the bead opposite the valve stem just enough to either insert the syringe or enough opening to pour the stuff using the cap. Hit it with the air compressor and it'll seal right up again. No more than 40 psi please. So far zero failures even with rims and tires that supposedly aren't supposed to work.
    "This is my favorite section...watch your step..."

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    Prestas are smaller than schrader. I think you have your names confused.
    Your tire tread will give out long before 2or3 years worth of riding, so the latex shouldn't build up. As far as going back to tubes if you drill out your tires, just buy tubes with schrader valves ( I think) instead.
    Go to you tube and search "gorilla tubeless" there is a great 2part video to watch.
    Also check out the wheels and tires forum, tons of threads to help you out.
    Good luck

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCrawler
    You may have that backwards.
    Uhhh... Yes I did.

    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCrawler
    Hit it with the air compressor and it'll seal right up again. No more than 40 psi please.
    So bike pump is out of the question? Too much fiddling around or because you just need a quick surge of air? What about when you need to "top off" every month?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    Oh yeah, one more thing: if you use the 20" tube method, and have to install a tube out on the trail due to popped bead/torn side wall etc you will have to totally disassemble your setup or cut out your stem. If you use gorilla tape or rimstrips, just unscrew the stem, and you're good to go.

  26. #26
    Pivotal figure
    Reputation: kenbentit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    6,373
    Bike pump is a maybe with most tubeless setups (including UST rims). I've gotten it to work fine with certain tire/rim combos and others have required lots of compressor time and persuasion. I just picked up a small compressor at Home Depot and saved myself the late night trip to the gas station
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by ajmelin
    Go to you tube and search "gorilla tubeless" there is a great 2part video to watch.
    Good luck
    Checked out that YouTube video (2 part), and he uses premixed latex, and UST tires. Will try with my present tires (folding Panaracer Fire XC Pro) and art supply latex.

    Thanks!

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    179

    Ghetto

    I had good luck with the gorilla tape, and home brew method on non ust tires, although I have to say the ust tires have a stronger sidewall and feel more stable. The non ust felt like they were going to roll off the rim if I ran the pressure to low. But it was better then tubes, because no flats. They did burp every once and while and I would just pump them up on the trail. Never tried the split tube method although some guys swear by it and say they don't burp. Good luck.

  29. #29
    Bloodied but Unbowed
    Reputation: DesertCrawler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by UnderWurlde
    Uhhh... Yes I did.



    So bike pump is out of the question? Too much fiddling around or because you just need a quick surge of air? What about when you need to "top off" every month?
    You need a high volume of air to make the bead want to seat. A compressor makes short work of this. However, it can be done with a hand pump but you need a good pump, and ideally, someone else pumping while someone coerces the tire to seat against the rim. It is or can be a tricky PITA. On the trail, forget about it. Pack a spare tube and be done with it.
    "This is my favorite section...watch your step..."

  30. #30
    Bloodied but Unbowed
    Reputation: DesertCrawler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,498
    Quote Originally Posted by ajmelin
    Oh yeah, one more thing: if you use the 20" tube method, and have to install a tube out on the trail due to popped bead/torn side wall etc you will have to totally disassemble your setup or cut out your stem. If you use gorilla tape or rimstrips, just unscrew the stem, and you're good to go.
    That's a great point. I was concerned about my non-UST Kevlar WTB MotoRaptors not seating so well against the non-UST rim so I chose the BMX tube approach. I have Gorilla tape in the correct width ready to try another rim so maybe that is the approach to go with next time. The worst is I waste a little time, some sealant, and have to revert to a 20" tube which I also already have.
    "This is my favorite section...watch your step..."

  31. #31
    zul
    zul is offline
    Will Guide for Beer
    Reputation: zul's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    709
    Quote Originally Posted by UnderWurlde

    So bike pump is out of the question? Too much fiddling around or because you just need a quick surge of air? What about when you need to "top off" every month?
    Initial setup = Compressor. Bike pump is 'possible' but increased chance to fail.

    Top off with air = Floor pump, hand pump or compressor. Simple.
    If lovin you is wrong, I don't wanna be right

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: 5bravobravo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    385

    Yeah, dirt bike tube cannibalism

    That's a killer idea, I just been running the split tube method, but it looks so ghetto..

    I dig the idea of running the old schrader valve off a motorcycle tube with Gorilla tape..do the beads seal willingly? or do they take bulk Stans to get there..I figured having the rubber tube between the tire and rim help form a seal...I guess it would vary tire to tire?

    I just happen to have a pile of dirt-bike tubes to cannibalize...

    Wish I could find a way to ghetto tubeless the dirtbike as well...I'm always getting pinch flats, or ripping the stems off the rear tube because the bead-locks can't keep the tire from slipping on the rim under hard acceleration/braking, high traction conditions...faulty rim-locks I think, never happened in 35yrs riding dirtbikes (although I also never had a bike with as much brute force power as the one I have now either).
    Check my pulse...

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    Quote Originally Posted by 5bravobravo
    I dig the idea of running the old schrader valve off a motorcycle tube with Gorilla tape..do the beads seal willingly? or do they take bulk Stans to get there..I figured having the rubber tube between the tire and rim help form a seal...I guess it would vary tire to tire?
    The tires you use are what is important in my experience. My WTB's were very loose and sloppy. they were old, and a first time experiment. I had to use a ratchet tiedown around the tires to get them to seat with ALOT of extra sealant (I used homemade) around the bead. My Specialized Captians mounted no sweat.
    The Gorilla tape only goes into the channel where the spoke holes are, the tube doesn't contact it at all.

  34. #34
    don't fear the barleywine
    Reputation: Moe's Tavern's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    87
    $4.25 ea, shipped
    confirmed 8g w/alu cap
    large rubber washer
    schrader dominance



    These are gorilla tape's best friend. I had to cut several mm off of the retaining nut, but otherwise a perfect setup for those of us who hate presta valves.

  35. #35
    Old-newbie
    Reputation: g3rG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    379
    ooo...good find!

    The Joe's no-flat stems appear to have disappeared, and I needed another option.

    and btw, I really hate presta valves!

    gerG
    ...uphill uphill uphill DOWNHILL! uphill uphill uphill uphill DOWNHILL! uphill ...

  36. #36
    Eroding into the trail
    Reputation: DustyBones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by Moe's Tavern
    $4.25 ea, shipped
    confirmed 8g w/alu cap
    large rubber washer
    schrader dominance



    These are gorilla tape's best friend. I had to cut several mm off of the retaining nut, but otherwise a perfect setup for those of us who hate presta valves.
    Was the retaining nut too tall to allow the cap to snug down?
    Its hard to tell what the nut looks like - here or on the website; is the nut tall in design?
    Or is the threaded valve just on the short side when installed thru the rim?

    "Black anodized. Laser etched 949 logo reputed to be worth 3hp, no really."
    We all need more hp!

  37. #37
    don't fear the barleywine
    Reputation: Moe's Tavern's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by DustyBones
    Was the retaining nut too tall to allow the cap to snug down?
    Its hard to tell what the nut looks like - here or on the website; is the nut tall in design?
    Or is the threaded valve just on the short side when installed thru the rim?
    Correct, the retaining nut was too long and interfered with the cap. I think the retaining nut is extra long to protect the threaded body of the valve since it's original design intent is for car racing. The valve is not "short", rather it's designed for automotive applications, not double wall mtb wheels. Hacksaw off like 6mm and file smooth. Takes one minute. Another advantage of these valves is the rubber washer is thick and conical so it can accommodate a non-flat interface in the drop center portion of the rim.

    Last edited by Moe's Tavern; 05-19-2011 at 08:08 AM.

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    3,557
    Quote Originally Posted by Moe's Tavern
    Correct, the retaining nut was too long and interfered with the cap. I think the retaining nut is extra long to protect the threaded body of the valve since it's original design intent is for car racing. The valve is not "short", rather it's designed for automotive applications, not double wall mtb wheels. Hacksaw off like 6mm and file smooth. Takes one minute. Another advantage of these valves is the rubber washer is thick and conical so it can accommodate a non-flat interface in the drop center portion of the rim.


    Thanks for the tip. Just ordered some. Much better than slipping brown paper packages over the counter!
    My brain went from "you probably shouldn't say that" to WTF!

  39. #39
    Eroding into the trail
    Reputation: DustyBones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    897
    Thanks much for the info & especially the photos of the components; just as I had assumed, the double-wall rim thickness affected the fit of the nut.
    The mfgr. should put images & measurements on their website for that item!
    The product looks nice; I'm going to order some for my rims.

    BTW
    Anyone ordering these, if you have a Dremel tool, you can use a disc cutter to more easily cut/shorten the nut (& make a nicer cut than a hacksaw), and it might not even require filing afterward. Available where Dremel tools are sold.

  40. #40
    Brit on a trip
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    452
    I have been using the pipe tape system with Schraeder valves for a couple of years with great success. Continental or Schwalbe bike tubes have fully threaded valves but the lock nuts are not ideal.

    However, finding that motor bike tubes have fully threaded valves with proper nuts has solved that problem most satisfactorily - that gives you the cheapest solution and Chalkpaw's advice is spot on!
    Growing old is mandatory - growing up is optional

  41. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    335
    Quote Originally Posted by Moe's Tavern View Post
    $4.25 ea, shipped
    confirmed 8g w/alu cap
    large rubber washer
    schrader dominance



    These are gorilla tape's best friend. I had to cut several mm off of the retaining nut, but otherwise a perfect setup for those of us who hate presta valves.
    Awesome... thanks. They are only 5 miles from my house.

  42. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    62

    Presta sucks

    I have 5 bikes. My goal is to convert them all to Shrader. I believe presta should be banned from real Mountain bikes. All presta does for me is dig into my wallet for more CASH.

    So thanks for all the info on how to wing myself from presta garbage.

  43. #43
    Eroding into the trail
    Reputation: DustyBones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by 22GILBERT22 View Post
    I have 5 bikes. My goal is to convert them all to Shrader. I believe presta should be banned from real Mountain bikes. All presta does for me is dig into my wallet for more CASH.

    So thanks for all the info on how to wing myself from presta garbage.
    Black anodized. Laser etched 949 logo reputed to be worth 3hp!
    949 Racing threaded schreader valve is the shiznay!
    Just got mine & they are nice, now I just have to install them.

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: woahey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    1,289
    Quote Originally Posted by Tor-y-Foel View Post
    I have been using the pipe tape system with Schraeder valves for a couple of years with great success. Continental or Schwalbe bike tubes have fully threaded valves but the lock nuts are not ideal.
    :
    I just re-did my gt setup with Continental tubes. The nuts don't really seem to do much once the bead is set. I went to the local hardware store with the nut, found aluminum hex-nut that would fit but decided on a little loctite instead.

    All in all, I spent $20 on stuff I didn't already have, and will still never replace a pinch-flat of my own on the trails...

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    186
    thought I would bring this back from the dead and ask a couple questions about the valves mo brought to our attention...When showing the entire purchase I am wondering if all parts were used? I is the conical piece that looks like a funnel used anywhere? Anyone else using these?

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    186
    that makes sense...didnt know it was rubber.

    Thanks

    Ahhh...the reading of minds before posts are sent is back..

  47. #47
    don't fear the barleywine
    Reputation: Moe's Tavern's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    87
    Quote Originally Posted by 96p993 View Post
    thought I would bring this back from the dead and ask a couple questions about the valves mo brought to our attention...When showing the entire purchase I am wondering if all parts were used? I is the conical piece that looks like a funnel used anywhere? Anyone else using these?
    Yes all parts are used. The rubber cone is the seal.

  48. #48
    Eroding into the trail
    Reputation: DustyBones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    897
    ^
    ^
    ^
    Buy them!
    You will be happy!

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: smilinsteve's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    8,609
    Quote Originally Posted by 22GILBERT22 View Post
    I have 5 bikes. My goal is to convert them all to Shrader. I believe presta should be banned from real Mountain bikes. All presta does for me is dig into my wallet for more CASH.

    So thanks for all the info on how to wing myself from presta garbage.
    How do presta valves dig into your wallet?

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Pitto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    520
    Quote Originally Posted by Moe's Tavern View Post
    $4.25 ea, shipped
    confirmed 8g w/alu cap
    large rubber washer
    schrader dominance



    These are gorilla tape's best friend. I had to cut several mm off of the retaining nut, but otherwise a perfect setup for those of us who hate presta valves.
    For Those in AUS, i just bought a set from this mob

    https://www.mx5centre.com.au/index.p...roducts_id=244

    Yes, they are almost double the US price, but the FEDEX post cost would be a killer.

    Looking forward to my tubeless conversion now

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    15
    Just order 2 from heel toe auto. Total came to $8.70 with coupon rsxrocks and shipping. Not to shabby

    The 949 website says minimum of 4 so i looked for a different retailer.

  52. #52
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by Moe's Tavern View Post
    Yes all parts are used. The rubber cone is the seal.
    Done and done...Great mod to wheels and a great peace of mind!
    Last edited by 96p993; 07-30-2011 at 02:27 PM.

  53. #53
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by Moe's Tavern View Post
    $4.25 ea, shipped
    confirmed 8g w/alu cap
    large rubber washer
    schrader dominance



    These are gorilla tape's best friend. I had to cut several mm off of the retaining nut, but otherwise a perfect setup for those of us who hate presta valves.
    I know this is an old thread but....
    holy crap.. that's cheaper than the Presta valves for tubeless... and I think they are lighter even...? and i kinda like the look better, might convert my Presta's over...

    got a friend doing tubeless with an older Schrader set up wheels and was linked back to this thread!! nice find!!!
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    100
    I bought these 949 valves and installed them today on my laserdiscs. For whatever reason, it is still leaking at the valve no matter how much I snug it down. Any ideas what I'm doing wrong? I initially tried presta valves and gorilla tape but the valve was leaking, so I found this post and bought these valves. They fit perfectly, so I had high hopes... but no luck. Any ideas?

  55. #55
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by jrss13 View Post
    I bought these 949 valves and installed them today on my laserdiscs. For whatever reason, it is still leaking at the valve no matter how much I snug it down. Any ideas what I'm doing wrong? I initially tried presta valves and gorilla tape but the valve was leaking, so I found this post and bought these valves. They fit perfectly, so I had high hopes... but no luck. Any ideas?
    yup.. had it happen on lots of rims, presta or not with a variety of stem..

    the fix, a dab of Polyurethane caulk


    I use the caulk cause I have it around being in construction, heard of people using mold builder from the art stores but I think the caulk is cheaper and easier to get a hold of...? depends on what you have around for stores.

    DON'T use latex caulk, it's not structural strong enough nor does it have enough adhesive properties to hold under pressure, it might work for a short time but you will eventually see the sealant leaking out the stem again,...


    only need a little dab what ever you use and spin the stem a few times to get an even distribution before tightening down the tension bolt to the rim... let sit over night to dry is also best.. do all that and the leaks will be gone
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    100
    Thanks, I'll give that a shot, I have some laying around. I figured the 949 stems would solve my problem, but I guess not.

  57. #57
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by jrss13 View Post
    Thanks, I'll give that a shot, I have some laying around. I figured the 949 stems would solve my problem, but I guess not.
    ya.. sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't.. but those stems are better than using presta with adaptors anyway...
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  58. #58
    Old-newbie
    Reputation: g3rG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    379
    Quote Originally Posted by jrss13 View Post
    I bought these 949 valves and installed them today on my laserdiscs. For whatever reason, it is still leaking at the valve no matter how much I snug it down. Any ideas what I'm doing wrong? I initially tried presta valves and gorilla tape but the valve was leaking, so I found this post and bought these valves. They fit perfectly, so I had high hopes... but no luck. Any ideas?
    I have some rims that refuse to seal at the valve. On those I install the 949 valve before taping. Then I run the tape over the valve (2 layers at the valve) then use an xacto to cut a hole the size of the center bore of the valve. Easy, and no extra goop to give out on me.

    gerG
    ...uphill uphill uphill DOWNHILL! uphill uphill uphill uphill DOWNHILL! uphill ...

  59. #59
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    hey, anyone using the 949's notice the seat sticks up above the rim bead? kinda don't like that... Just did them on a friend bike last night and they work well, but thinking I might pull them and replace the seat/seal with an O-ring to lower them below the bead lip. ? there is a lip in the Alum body so it I get the right size and thickness I think it'll work...
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CaptDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    279

    Tubeless with 949 schrader valves

    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    hey, anyone using the 949's notice the seat sticks up above the rim bead?
    ...thinking I might pull them and replace the seat/seal with an O-ring to lower them below the bead lip...
    I just did the 949's on a SUNRingle Charger wheelset.

    Charger Pro | SUNRinglé

    These rims have a pretty deep section between the inner & outer walls, so in order to have a workable valve-stem length I had to cut the shoulder off the lock-down nut and trim the conical rubber seal.

    The seal is surprisingly soft and easy to cut with a small pair of scissors. Everything buttoned-up slick as can be.

    The o-ring idea would probably work too. Or maybe a neoprene washer.

    The seat of the valve stills protrudes a bit into the tire "bed", but has caused no issues.

    I also slipped a thin mylar washer between the lock-down nut and rim to keep from marring the paint.



    These valves are tough to beat for anyone going tubeless. They are sturdy, the installation is simple, robust, & fuss-free, they're freakin' light, and CHEAP!

    Black anodized aluminum valve

    Imagine if someone contacted the manufacturer of these little beauties and had them produce a lighter, smaller, bicycle-specific valve?

    Who? Presta? Never heard of 'em!

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    90
    cut the valve stems out of used dirt bike tube(free from m/c shops)
    then grind the sides to fit the v- of the rim. tighten nut. very simple and free!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  62. #62
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CaptDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    279

    I'd like "Going Ghetto" for $1000, Alex.

    Very true, but for someone with weight-weenie tendencies, the steel motorcycle pieces are a bit heavy.

    Still, this thread is about going ghetto, so it's "Simple & Free" for the win!

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cstem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,851
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptDan View Post
    Very true, but for someone with weight-weenie tendencies, the steel motorcycle pieces are a bit heavy.

    Still, this thread is about going ghetto, so it's "Simple & Free" for the win!
    If someone is a weight weenie- they are using presta.
    Vassago Cycles, Shadetree Bikes, Flat Tire Bikes, Galfer Brakes USA

  64. #64
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CaptDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    279
    But someone with weight-weenie tendencies just dabbles in the disease.

    Besides, I believe (just a "hand check" - my scale isn't accurate down in the single-digit grams) the 949Racing schrader valves are lighter than a comparable Presta.

  65. #65
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptDan View Post
    But someone with weight-weenie tendencies just dabbles in the disease.

    Besides, I believe (just a "hand check" - my scale isn't accurate down in the single-digit grams) the 949Racing schrader valves are lighter than a comparable Presta.
    Yes they are
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    90
    if you really want accurate pressure readings Schrader is the only way to go.
    with presta you always have a air loss when using a gauge.
    as for as weight,if one can notice the rolling diff. between the 2 they are definitely weight weenies.

  67. #67
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
    Reputation: shiggy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 1998
    Posts
    48,236

    Threaded Schrader valve for ghetto tubeless?

    Quote Originally Posted by yz129 View Post
    if you really want accurate pressure readings Schrader is the only way to go.
    with presta you always have a air loss when using a gauge.
    Wrong! You are using the wrong gauge. I use a digital presta gauge and lose no more than 0.1psi. Can check a tire 3 times in a row and get the same reading to the tenth.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  68. #68
    I like beer.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    97
    hey im getting ready to do this, and i cant figure out where the aluminum washer goes?

    between the inside of the rim and the rubber piece?
    between the outside of the rim and the threaded piece you cut down?

    any help would be appreciated.

  69. #69
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    I threw the washer away. If you want to use it, it goes between the threaded piece you cut and the outside of the rim. It's to keep the nut from digging into the rim when you tighten it. When I cut mine, I cut all of the straight portion off, I just have the nut.
    The rubber piece has to fit tight into the inside of the rim as that is what creates the seal for the valve and the hole in the rim.

  70. #70
    I like beer.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    97
    great, thanks so much for the help.

    it just threw me off when the guy who originally posted these valves said that 'every part was used'. and i couldnt figure out where the washer went..

    trying these on my dh bike, mtx 31 rims with 2.5 schwalbie wicked wills, and stans sealant. hoping for the best, as the OG tubless method (cut tube) isnt really tubeless when you think about it

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    If you're doing the cut tube, why not just use the valve from the tube?

  72. #72
    I like beer.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    97
    im not. im doing the gorilla tape method.

    i was just saying that i dont consider the cut tube method to be true 'tubeless', as theres still a tube in there. i was saying that i really hope this works, cause i refuse to do the cut tube method.

    worst comes to worst, the 17 bucks i spent on sealant, 18 bucks spent on 949 valves, and 3 bones spent on gorilla tape will go down in a fiery crash of fail and i will have to put the tubes back in..

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    Gotcha, I miss read. I'm using the valves w/ gorilla tape, and no issues what so ever. Hopefully you'll be as lucky

  74. #74
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    2,685
    I think I got mine for "949" a ATB shop on the net, they are super nice and light made out of aluminum and then anodize.

  75. #75
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation: big0mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    4,060
    Glad this got bumped 'cause one thing I've wanted to mention for a while is I don't think these will last forever. I've had 3 or 4 situations where I had to throw a tube in which meant pulling this stem out. After putting it back in at home it was increasingly difficult to get it to seal RIGHT AROUND the stem. Last time I actually had to do the shakey shake thing and then spun the tire all the way around so the stem was on top and let what little sealant would stick up there drain down into the gap around the stem and hole. It took several sessions of doing this but it finally sealed up.

    I think my next "issue" is going to require a new stem. The little bit of rubber around the base of the stem gets compressed and doesn't bounce back to for a great seal.

    Just my experience...

  76. #76
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CaptDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    279
    Good point. What can be done is replace the shot seal with an o-ring or a neoprene washer -- anything to re-seal that area.


    My set-up is the same as GR1822's (in post #69). Has worked flawlessly all summer. We're about to do a second wheelset. Makes for a great transition to tubeless.

  77. #77
    I like beer.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    I think my next "issue" is going to require a new stem. The little bit of rubber around the base of the stem gets compressed and doesn't bounce back to for a great seal.

    Just my experience...
    if you used the 949 valves, just hit up 949 and ask for rubber replacements. i was looking at the rubber insert today, right before i installed them and thought the same thing to myself, "this rubber piece looks like a consumable piece".. hopefully later on down the road when i email em theyll have some.. atleast i ordered 4, so ill be okay for a while.

    anywho, so far so good. pretty amazed at how well it went and how simple the gorilla tape method is.. thanks again for the help GR1822.

  78. #78
    I like beer.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptDan View Post
    Good point. What can be done is replace the shot seal with an o-ring or a neoprene washer -- anything to re-seal that area.


    My set-up is the same as GR1822's (in post #69). Has worked flawlessly all summer. We're about to do a second wheelset. Makes for a great transition to tubeless.
    see the post above this one for a possible 'solution'. sorry, i forgot to multi quote it earlier.

    i ended up using the washer on top of the rim, the rim is wide, so it just barely hangs over a little bit (not enough to bother). i ended up cutting all the extruded portion, and just leaving nut itself. then i snugged it down lightly with a wrench.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    396
    I just finished installing the 949 valves in my Flow EX 29 rims. I'm so happy to be rid of the stupid prestas and adapters. I've yet to hear a single sound reason for why they are better than schraeders.

    I turned down the caps and nuts on a lathe to shorten them. You could do the same with a vise and a hack saw, or a dremel tool, or just by picking up normal nuts/caps at the hardware store.

    We'll see if i have any trouble holding air. The only reason i would is if i didn't do a clean enough job on the rim tape around the valve stem.

    As a side note, i mounted up a pair of Continental Trail Kind 29 x 2.4 and am pretty disappointed with the width. They measure about 2.2" across the widest part of the tread, what gives! The Maxxis Ardent 2.4 that i took off was a legit 2.4. Hopefully the contis will stretch out a little bit, this is the first time they've been aired up. I doubt it though.


    does my picture show up?
    Bend, OR

  80. #80
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    Picture shows, welcome to the world of schrader tubeless.
    Way more better!

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    65
    I would like to see a step by step on this. I'd like to see all the bits and pieces, as well as the trimming and extra parts.

    I'm still leaning toward using a 20" bike tube, but could be swayed to go this route with the 949s.

  82. #82
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    Try doing a search for 949 in all forums. There is a thread somewhere that shows exactly what you're asking. There may even be a link to it in this thread.
    It's really simple and self explanatory once you get your hands on the stems.

    Edit: look at post #37 of this thread. All of the parts are clearly displayed. The only cut that needs to be made is on the piece that has the nut which turns into a smooth sleeve. Cut it off just above the nut.

  83. #83
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    80
    In case anyone is pondering getting these, 949 gives you free shipping if you buy the minimum 4 valve stems. They don't advertise it anywhere, but when you go to checkout it's free! So that's $17 for 4 valve stems, versus $14 for 2 (after shipping) from heeltoe.

  84. #84
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation: big0mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    4,060
    Quote Originally Posted by NickSmolinske View Post
    In case anyone is pondering getting these, 949 gives you free shipping if you buy the minimum 4 valve stems. They don't advertise it anywhere, but when you go to checkout it's free! So that's $17 for 4 valve stems, versus $14 for 2 (after shipping) from heeltoe.
    Just scored 4. I should be set for a couple dozen years now... (can't pass up such a good deal!)

  85. #85
    Village Newbie
    Reputation: SlickWilly8019's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    79
    Oh man I wish I had found this a year ago, I fight the presta valves on my stans rim strips every time I have to fill or top them off. Even with the adapter for my air chuck I spend more time trying to get air into the tire than I'd like, almost having to cock the air chuck side ways to get it to air up. And I am using an standard automotive air chuck, not like the ones that the LBS have that slip over.

    I may just have to do the change over, it suck having to fumble around in the bag to find the adapter when I burp a tire off the rim.

  86. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GR1822's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    2,094
    It's never to late to convert!

    I think when I bought a set recently from 949 it was only $8.50. I remember shipping was free.

  87. #87
    Village Newbie
    Reputation: SlickWilly8019's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    79
    After tonite I'm done with presta valves for the long haul and the idiotic adapters, I had an adapter cross thread and I ended up breaking the valve inside the stem, the stem is still good as I was able to remove the broken part but I question what the purpose is of Presta valves now>?.

    I had a few choice words to say about the pair, I have always had an issue cross threading and it seemed to line up, except this time it was permanent. All the work topping off my sealant and getting ready for a ride in the morning - out the window. Gotta wait for the worst shopping day of the year just so I can drive down to one of the worst intersections for accidents, so I can ride until an order of 949's arrives next week.

    Am I supposed to remove the Stans rimstrip and just go with gorilla tape in place of that?

  88. #88
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by SlickWilly8019 View Post

    Am I supposed to remove the Stans rimstrip and just go with gorilla tape in place of that?
    I would..
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CaptDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    279
    Am I supposed to remove the Stans rimstrip and just go with gorilla tape in place of that?
    I would figure it would be best to run the Stan's tape, as it was specifically designed for tubeless application, unless it was damaged. Or am I missing something...?

  90. #90
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptDan View Post
    I would figure it would be best to run the Stan's tape, as it was specifically designed for tubeless application, unless it was damaged. Or am I missing something...?
    Stand rim strips and stand tape are 2 different things.... and gorilla tape works better than stands tape, just saw tad heavier
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CaptDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    279
    Thanks!

    And Happy Thanksgiving to everyone!

  92. #92
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation: big0mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    4,060
    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    Stand rim strips and stand tape are 2 different things.... and gorilla tape works better than stands tape, just saw tad heavier
    It's also a mutha to get OFF the rim when you need to retape it... Done it once and gonna have to do it again with this next set of Nevegals although I don't plan on cleaning the rims as well as I did last time. Then I removed ALL the residue. This time I'm just gonna pull the tape off and retape it this time.

    Got my new 949s today in the mail and a fresh tub of liquid latex for a new batch of sealant so I'm set to go.

  93. #93
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    I don't bother pulling it unless it has an issue. Orange clean mixed with rubbing alcohol takes the glue from it right off thou, well easier anyway.

    Don't waste $$ on the "bike" Orange stuff. Just go to the Lowe's/home depot/ace hardware and get the gallon for 10 bucks. 75-80% Orange to 20-25% alcohol works great .
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  94. #94
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation: big0mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    4,060
    I don't usually pull it off but after a handful or burps or other issues that requires the tire be removed means that the tape gets pushed around by the bead. Right now it's a sloppy mess that's been pushed quite a ways into the middle of the rim by the spokes. It's been making the toughest part of the seal being the spokes.

    I'll try the orange and alcohol, though... :thumbsups:

  95. #95
    Village Newbie
    Reputation: SlickWilly8019's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    79

    Marlin Bonny stock wheels.

    I got my 949 valves a few days ago and just did my front wheel tonight, I gotta say I've never had the joy of messing around with gorilla tape. It sticks to everything it touches, and removes cat hair from cat. It doesn't like to be pulled apart from itself very well, I had a hell of a time doing the taping.

    Also noted the valve sticking up in the center , my work around was loosening the valve enough to force the bead on both sides to go in then I tightened it down, aired it up and had leakage problems. I added the partial bottle of slime since I can see it better and its cheaper to waste, aired up to seat the bead, it leaked down immediately, sprayed more soapy water on it hit it again, leaked down slower this time, hit it for the 3rd time and still lost pressure , added more slime aired up again and waited, still felt cold air but it could be my poor blood circulation playing tricks on my hands.

    Primarily the leakage was coming from the valve stem mount, poured a bath tub of water and fiddled with it for about 10 minutes until I could no longer see the air bubbles. I don't know!!!


    I actually use purple power stuff from walmart for cleaning the bike @ 10-20% solution it doesn't hurt the parts at all, full strength for the chain and then rinse. I used acetone the first time I cleaned the wheel for Stans rim tape and the rimstrip.
    Last edited by SlickWilly8019; 12-20-2013 at 08:30 PM.

  96. #96
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    on the next one.. few points to think about and try. Many will depend on your rim and the situation...

    ..sealing to the tape/rim better...
    1st before installing tape, remount the wheel in the bike or in a wheel truing stand so you can easily rotate it while taping,.. even easier if you have someone helping who can hold- rotate-hold- rotate so you can get the tape super tight.

    2nd, you can get a better hole in the tape if you find a round metal object that is just a tad smaller than the hole in the rim, heat it up and melt the tape to get the hole, this is better than cutting as it's less likely to continue tearing beyond the hole and lead to a leak.

    3rd, before installing the stem, throw a tube and tire in and go for a quick ride around the block... then remove and install the stem. This will seat the tape firmly and push out any air bubbles or odd spots in the tape. Also if you can break just one side of the bead of the tire to get out the tube and install the stem, this will make pumping up much easier later

    4th, installing the stem may take some modification if you have a deep inset of the web in the rim. A couple I did with those stems I had to take a rotary tool and grind off a bit of the inner lip and the rubber seal to get it to sit down inside the web to seal against the tape properly. Another I replaced the wedged shape seal and got a O-ring from a few cents at the local hardware store which got it down below the bead of the rim. All of them I ended up cutting the nut down.

    5th, Seal the stem before installing tire. Many use what ever sealant they are going to use inside the tire and and drip some around the seal and stem before setting the stem and let dry. This works many times and at the least seals 80% so a little leaking of the sealant later during final setup will seal up the stem. I found a MUCH better thing to use is a Poly Caulk.. NOT A LATEX CAULK!! Poly caulks have much better adhesion and a ton better structural strength than latex (basically the same adhesive that gorilla glue/tape use) Put it on the hole and any area of the seal in contact with surface of the stem or rim before tightening down. Let it dry over night if possible. This has never leaked on me ever. I only use PL (now owned by Loctite) Window and door poly caulk, but I hear Dap and other brands are now making a similar caulk. I've never tried them as I always have the PL around for work (I'm a carpenter and it's all I'll use now on my jobs as I know it works plan and simple)


    6th get a syringe and tube unit to inject sealant.. truckerCO.com is selling them for like 3 bucks or something right now and they'll make life SOO much easier and cleaner!! Also when injecting remove the core and before putting the core back in take a cotton swab and stick it in there and clean the seal for the core, this way it doesn't get glued in when you need to service/add sealant... air what ever later.


    Lastly, take your time... The first few times it can take a long time and seem a pain to do all these steps..but after doing a few,.. well I can do a whole conversion in less than a 1/2 hr (not including drying time) Great idea is to do it over a crappy weather weekend so you're not rushing to get out and ride
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  97. #97
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation: big0mike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    4,060
    I like tip #3. In place of #6 I take the air gun and blow some in to clean out any leftover sealant.

  98. #98
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
    Reputation: thomllama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    4,237
    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike View Post
    I like tip #3. In place of #6 I take the air gun and blow some in to clean out any leftover sealant.
    ya, that's probably good enough, But I still prefer a solid object swipe over just air. Air still leaves a tad behind that can goop things up That and getting the air nozzle in-between the spokes I always get something hung up LOLOL But ya, again, it's probably more than enough...
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  99. #99
    Village Newbie
    Reputation: SlickWilly8019's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    79
    I removed it and got after the valve stem sealing cone that comes with the 949 valves, I cut a very small piece off the top of the cone and that seems to have worked and is the end all to the air leaking out. I aired that tire up 2 weeks ago to about 50psi or rock hard just to be sure it locked the bead to the rim. I've been out riding and it felt fine Ihavent noticed any significant air loss in the front tire at all so much so I wont have to air it up again for probably another 2 weeks, this will be nice. With presta valves I was having to air up once a week to keep from losing the bead seal and boogering the sealant. I have those stupid tires that aren't any good in mud or rain so I dont go out riding when it rains.

    I'm probably just going to do the rear tire even though its holding up fine. Maybe I'll be able to part with the rimstrips and get some $ back on them.

    I do the 2nd option on both tubeless setups, have a couple of screw drivers that are used for heating and melting stuff together mainly plastic welding. that works but its stinky, its worth noting that if you run 2 layers of tape you may have a raised section of melted tape around the hole it made for sealing the stem difficult, use an exacto knife to soften it up a bit by removing the hardened melted tape portion don't fray the hole.

    Also I first bought the 1.88" wide roll of gorilla tape and split it down the middle, easier said than done, it was still not quite wide enuff for my 29er bonny rim. the 1" wide was just right provided I stretch it as I pull and lay it down. I used an exacto knife to get the sides to look correct.


    Update and ETA:

    As of 1/17/2014 I have yet to add any air the front tire it is still plenty hard and is holding up great. So well in fact that I converted the rear tire to the same and with a little finess I was able to get the tire to hold air in the same manner, it only took more time because of all the punctures in that tire. I would also like to add that if you go with method and use the 1" wide tape and trim it while its on the wheel, go slow, even if you screw up and remove a little too much all you need to do is cut a section of tape long enough + a few inches to cover up the less than ideal areas. I had 2 sections that I got carried away with and I had no issues sealing the tire on the rim.
    Last edited by SlickWilly8019; 01-17-2014 at 02:44 PM.

  100. #100
    JXG
    JXG is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    184
    "i was just saying that i dont consider the cut tube method to be true 'tubeless', as theres still a tube in there."

    So what is the current thinking on "split-tube" ghetto rim strip

    Ghetto tubeless conversion DIY: tips and tricks

    vs. just using tape?

    I found this FAQ:

    Need a rim strip: “Can I convert my standard mountain bike rim to tubeless with tape and valve only? No. Without a rubber rim strip your tires will burp air very easily when ridden at normal mountain bike and cyclocross bike air pressures. The rubber rim strip creates a second bead lock between the tire bead and the bottom of the rim. This prevents the tire from loosing air when a force on the side of the tire pushes it away from the sidewall of the rim.”

    NoTubes Recommended Tires

    My concern is a tape-only setup that seems fine and then burps when the tire takes a hard hit at just the wrong angle. I've had this happen with a Stan's strip that doesn't seem to quite fit my wheel/tire combination. It is painful

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 18

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.