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  1. #1
    Zipper
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    Thank You and Goodbye

    As some of you know I am making a major life change and stepping out of my comfort zone starting on November 6th, 2011. I will be leaving Phoenix for southern Florida via my own power.

    I want to thank all you riders out there who have ridden with, helped out, put up with, laughed and ever thought that I was being too cautious on SoMo. I have learned how to be a better rider from every one of you. From watching your lines to the encouragement to try a line that scared the heck out of me for many years only to find out that it was really easy all along. I hope that I have helped other riders as well and will miss SoMo and the many other trails here in Phoenix.






    I have put a lot of thought into this trip and sold nearly everything I own in order to do this and I am leaving everything else up to chance once I leave here. I have loaded and reloaded everything I am taking with me multiple times at this point and have also built in redundant features into what is going with me. One of those features is the fact that, if needed, I will be able to load the trike onto the trailer and pull the trailer with the bike in an emergency. Another being that I am bringing 2 spare drive wheels for the trike and spare tubes, tires, cassette, derailleur, chain, and enough tools to fix any part on the bike or trike.

    There will be a send off ride starting from 48th St and Warner (NW corner) from the Cafe'. We will be meeting at 7am, November 6th, where we can chat and have a good time until 8am, when we will head east on Warner to 56th St/Priest and head south to Wild Horse Pass Rd (the one that goes to Firebird Raceway), where the group ride will end, and I will head south towards Tuscon.(those that wish to ride further are welcome to but it will be on the shoulder of the freeway)

    You can also follow me on Facebook at Robert's Ride Site
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    where I will be posting my progress, stories, and pictures along the way when I can get internet access and power.

    Again
    Thank you all for the good times
    Robert
    Zipper aka Rob

  2. #2
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    Wow.
    I don't know you, but good luck. It sounds like you are in for an interesting adventure.
    Good luck and G-d's speed.

  3. #3
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    Best of luck on your adventure, and the next chapter of your life. Major kudos for having the 'nads to do it!

  4. #4
    Alive and Lurkin'
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    A++. Although I can't make the group send off, I've been and will be following your story on FB. I wish you all the best and I'm sure your adventure will bring many, many stories worth two life times!
    Pumpin & Pimpin

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    this is seriously one of the coolest things i've ever seen/heard about. good luck to you on your adventure.

  6. #6
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    same here in that i have no idea who you are but wish you the best of luck in your journey. you are doing what prob 90% of other people don't have the nerve to do, get outside their comfort zone. if i'm around the morning of the 6th i'll stop by to bid you farewell.

    Godspeed.

  7. #7
    On wuss patrol
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    Holy *****, you're serious. Wishing you the best!
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  8. #8
    mtbr member
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    You talk about "scarey lines" on SoMo, but the line you're about to travel takes far more
    "balls" than pretty much anyone else on the AZ forum has.

    Last edited by Evil Patrick; 11-01-2011 at 07:14 AM.
    -- Evil Patrick

    Some of my Music

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    The trail...shall set you free.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    Dang, makes me want to get a facebook account....


    Good luck

  10. #10
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
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    the human bike-a-pede...

  11. #11
    MudMan
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    It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best, since you have to sweat up the hills and coast down them. Thus you remember them as they actually are, while in a motor car only a high hill impresses you, and you have no such accurate remembrance of country you have driven through as you gain by riding a bicycle. ~ Ernest Hemingway

    Good luck!

  12. #12
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    This reminds me of the folks who climb Mt. Everest. Or attempt to climb it. It's a monumental undertaking and possibly a check mark on one's personal bucket list. Maybe you are fundraising as well.

    I suppose all those intrepid mountain climbers have a send-off party with friends and well-wishers. And I suppose they say stupid things like be safe and come home in one piece. But I've lived long enough and followed enough stories about how many people die going into the wild or climbing or traveling down shoulders of high-speed highways, that I feel the best advice I could give is to tell you to find meaning or adventure some other way.

    I have a friend who made it just over halfway across Canada on his bike before he was struck by a couple of old timers in their RV. My wifes father stopped along the should of the interstate to assist a driver and was killed by a tractor-trailer driver who dozed off. I know of another cyclist killed trying to live a dream of riding from Central America to Alaska.

    You are planning a ride on the most boring strech of highway in the south. I've driven it all the way to the South of Florida and it was awful. Drivers are speeding and looking into a setting or rising sun, while becoming more and more drowsy. I was forced onto the shoulder several times by drivers drifting into my lane. There will be days, weeks, where you won't see anything of interest, just more highway. Tragedy strikes in a split second on our highways. In Flagstaff, we have had three fatalities involving bikers killed by motor vehicles. One was a drunk driver who was charged with a crime. The other two were possibly ticketed, but were impaired by either the sun or by their inability to see the biker in their mirror. Many others survived being hit by cars or trucks. They may look back and wonder why they put themselves in so much risk.

    It is my intent to scare you. To cause you to be even more careful. To get you to abort the first time you have a close call out there. I'm guessing it won't take long.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
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    prodigal son.Have you been called a ****** bag before?I'm guessing "yes".
    You don't think he's thought of this before?
    Return to your video game,now.You'll be safe and sound.

    Safe journey,man!You're awesome!
    codafurnituredesign.com

  14. #14
    On wuss patrol
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    @ scary: prod son is looking at this from the perspective of someone who has lost close and important people on the shoulder of a busy highway. Maybe take that into consideration and lighten up.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  15. #15
    K3N
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    Wow. Amazing. Best of luck and safe travels.

  16. #16
    Zipper
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    Thank you for all the Well Wishes and for taking some interest in this. I have no non-profit, charities, or fundraisers in this, this is about taking a chance and living a dream. I never turn down donations but a pat on the back, a hug, a good shake of the hand with the words "Have Fun" are equally as meaningful. I hope you will follow me and live my adventures with me on this journey.
    Zipper aka Rob

  17. #17
    Pivotal figure
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    Redefining hardcore IMO...Best of luck man!
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  18. #18
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    A couple of years ago in Florida met a Father /Son Duo that had just completed this Trek...2 of the happiest people I have ever encountered

  19. #19
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    You're a brave individual, best of luck to you!

    Why so much stuff? Tools and redundancy aside, it seems 5 boxes too many!

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linoleum View Post
    Why so much stuff? Tools and redundancy aside, it seems 5 boxes too many!
    My guess is that pretty much everything he still owns in this world are the bikes, the trailer, and what is in those boxes. I would have a tough time getting everything I own down to a space that compact.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  21. #21
    Zipper
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    My guess is that pretty much everything he still owns in this world are the bikes, the trailer, and what is in those boxes. I would have a tough time getting everything I own down to a space that compact.
    This is very true and it has been hard deciding what I want to keep and what to sell, or donate to Big Brothers Big Sisters and or give some items to friends that were not really donate-able items. I have narrowed the personal items down to the 2 footlockers just in front of the wheel guards on the trailer, the rest is camping, cooking or bike related items. The top black tote is my cooler (tote lined with 2 inch Styrofoam) since a regular cooler would not fit very well on the load.
    Zipper aka Rob

  22. #22
    "No Clue Crew"
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    Very cool adventure!!! Best of luck!!!

  23. #23
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    I admire your courage. Good luck!

  24. #24
    parenting for gnarness
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    godspeed brother! post updates.
    YES to Scottsdale Prop 420
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  25. #25
    Shovel Ready
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    Wish you the best. Will be following your adventure on FB.

    Question. Any light system on the rig? Thinking if you get caught in poor weather. It might be handy for others to see you.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

  26. #26
    My other ride is your mom
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    This reminds me of the folks who climb Mt. Everest. Or attempt to climb it. It's a monumental undertaking and possibly a check mark on one's personal bucket list. Maybe you are fundraising as well.

    I suppose all those intrepid mountain climbers have a send-off party with friends and well-wishers. And I suppose they say stupid things like be safe and come home in one piece. But I've lived long enough and followed enough stories about how many people die going into the wild or climbing or traveling down shoulders of high-speed highways, that I feel the best advice I could give is to tell you to find meaning or adventure some other way.

    I have a friend who made it just over halfway across Canada on his bike before he was struck by a couple of old timers in their RV. My wifes father stopped along the should of the interstate to assist a driver and was killed by a tractor-trailer driver who dozed off. I know of another cyclist killed trying to live a dream of riding from Central America to Alaska.

    You are planning a ride on the most boring strech of highway in the south. I've driven it all the way to the South of Florida and it was awful. Drivers are speeding and looking into a setting or rising sun, while becoming more and more drowsy. I was forced onto the shoulder several times by drivers drifting into my lane. There will be days, weeks, where you won't see anything of interest, just more highway. Tragedy strikes in a split second on our highways. In Flagstaff, we have had three fatalities involving bikers killed by motor vehicles. One was a drunk driver who was charged with a crime. The other two were possibly ticketed, but were impaired by either the sun or by their inability to see the biker in their mirror. Many others survived being hit by cars or trucks. They may look back and wonder why they put themselves in so much risk.

    It is my intent to scare you. To cause you to be even more careful. To get you to abort the first time you have a close call out there. I'm guessing it won't take long.
    Really? Just when I think you can't get any more douchy....you double down.....I realize that you have concerns and have lost folks close to you....but have you ever heard of a thing called tact?

    To the OP.....awesome undertaking...I wish you all the best!




  27. #27
    Zipper
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle64 View Post
    Question. Any light system on the rig? Thinking if you get caught in poor weather. It might be handy for others to see you.
    Answer. Yes, I have a Light In Motion Seca 1400 incase i get caught out after dark to see where I am going. On "the human bike-a-pede... " as Longhairmike put it, I have 2 white flashing frog lights on the steering knuckles, 1 red facing rear just below the mirror and one on the back of the seat (traffic side) as well as one on the flag of the trike. On the trailer I have 2 red Frog lights (one on each side mounted to the wheel guards) plus a red reflector. On the trailing bike I have a Cateye 360 visible (clear backed version so its visible from all directions) mounted to the seat post and a 5ft flag as well that will also have a small red flasher on it when i find some more batteries for it.

    Visibility is the most important part of keeping me safe on the road.
    Zipper aka Rob

  28. #28
    pedaller
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    You got those stilletos in one of those boxes?



    Best of luck Rob! Will also be following on FB.
    "Nobody ever told me not to try" - Curious George Soundtrack by Jack Johnson

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    @ scary: prod son is looking at this from the perspective of someone who has lost close and important people on the shoulder of a busy highway. Maybe take that into consideration and lighten up.
    @Malibu-prodigal son is looking at it from a self centered perspective.Instead of encouraging someone to live life to the fullest,with a "make sure you be safe and take every precaution"comment.He insists on pulling attention to himself with macbre tales of death from his own life.
    Would you tell someone wanting to be something dangerous,like a firefighter or police officer about horror stories of dying in the line of duty,just before that person goes off to training?
    Maybe YOU should take into consideration that this guy,obviously has thought about this for a while and understands the risks.Yet,..he wants to do this in his life!
    Every point could have been made without being a dick about it.But that wasn't good enough for him.

    Carry on rbtcha!You're the man!
    codafurnituredesign.com

  30. #30
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    Hi Rob, I don't know you but best wishes and good luck. It is stories like yours that make me read mtbr and inspire me to go out and ride.

  31. #31
    AKA shitbird
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    Well I think it's awesome Zipper! Hope to see you at the send off ride
    JRA

  32. #32
    Multiple Lines Rock
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    peace and wow, awesome

  33. #33
    PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
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    Best of luck Zipper! Safe travels and have fun in the keys!
    Bender to AZDog: I'm not the best person to give advice on not riding!

  34. #34
    Big B's Trails
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    Very cool, a inner inner inner part of me would like to do this but with kids and a wife it isn't reality so I, like others, will live vicariously through you BE SAFE!
    I dig dirt!

  35. #35
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    Make friends along the way and have a blast. I hope to join the send off ride. I would suggest a "make it rain" segment of the ride where people throw singles your way so you have cash for vending machine stops.

  36. #36
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Good luck Zipper!!! I look forward to following your adventure

  37. #37
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    Great story, and good luck. Do you have a route posted up anywhere?

  38. #38
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    Dude, this is inspiring beyond words! I once took a 3700 mile motorcycle trip and people thought "I" was crazy. I wish you nothing but fair temps and clear skies. Post your website here so I can follow your progress.

    Damn it, man, now you've given me a new item for my bucket list!
    Without heroes, we are all plain people, and don't know how far we can go. Bernard Malamud

  39. #39
    Hazardous to your health!
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    easily the sickest thing ive seen this month....,. GOOD LUCK!!!!
    2011 Specialized Rockhopper: Captain Tires, Disc Brakes, 24 speed

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  40. #40
    Hazardous to your health!
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    and not to be a dork but seriously man...be careful!
    2011 Specialized Rockhopper: Captain Tires, Disc Brakes, 24 speed

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  41. #41
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    What an incredible journey this will be! Good luck man! Where in SoFla are you headed to? I grew up in Miami so I know the area very well. Let me know if you need any advice or help regarding SoFla. Also be thankful you're getting there during "winter" as it will be a tad "drier" than the usual swamp air down there.

  42. #42
    Zipper
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooter_dude View Post
    Dude, this is inspiring beyond words! I once took a 3700 mile motorcycle trip and people thought "I" was crazy. I wish you nothing but fair temps and clear skies. Post your website here so I can follow your progress.

    Damn it, man, now you've given me a new item for my bucket list!
    Thank you.

    I have always dreamed of riding across the country, though I always thought it would be in a group tour, I feel I am doing the right thing and am looking forward to my departure on Sunday.

    I will continue to post on my Facebook Page
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    I will also try to cross post here as much as possible
    Zipper aka Rob

  43. #43
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    Best of luck, Rob!

  44. #44
    Downhill Messiah
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    Have a fun and safe trip man, and good luck.
    Madspeed always prevails!

  45. #45
    Beetlejuice!
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    Wow Zipper, I'll add myself to the list of envious people and say best wishes! Your send off is not too far from my house so I'll try to be up and make it there to say Bon Voyage!
    "too weird to live, too rare to die" - HST
    "Oh Gravity, thou art a heartless bitch" - Sheldon

  46. #46
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    Wow, Rob, I don't think I've had the honor to ride with you, but my thoughts will be with you as you head into your great adventure! I am really excited for you and look forward to following your epic through your updates here and on FB. Best to you, man.

  47. #47
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    Rob I also look forward to following your adventure on FB. I am curious what the total weight is that you will be traveling with, and how many miles you have ridden your rig to date? I know DRAG is of concern, but have you ever thought about a bigger flag with a higher mast?

    TD

  48. #48
    Zipper
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    Rob I also look forward to following your adventure on FB. I am curious what the total weight is that you will be traveling with, and how many miles you have ridden your rig to date? I know DRAG is of concern, but have you ever thought about a bigger flag with a higher mast?

    TD
    I actually have 2 flags, one as seen in the pic on the trike and the second is mounted to the axle of the trailing bike both have 5ft shafts. As far as total weight, right now a rough estimated weight with me on it is about 500 pounds, figuring 220 pounds for the load give or take a few pounds 80ish pounds for trike trailer and bike/muni, and 190 pounds for me. I think I will stop at the truck stop on the way out of town and get an exact weight.
    I have been rolling around town a bit on the trike with the trailer and a small load but haven't don any real serious long rides with it yet. The trailer pulls effortlessly untill you start climbing and then you have dead weight. on level ground I can honestly hardly tell it is back there and have to keep checking the mirror to be sure it is and since i put mountain gearing on the front instead of road, I will be able to just slowly grind up the worst of the hills as they come at me.
    Zipper aka Rob

  49. #49
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Best of luck to you Rob! I hope it turns out to be a great experience. Make share to keep us posted on your FB account. I'll be watching.

    Thx...Doug

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer View Post
    Really? Just when I think you can't get any more douchy....you double down.....I realize that you have concerns and have lost folks close to you....but have you ever heard of a thing called tact?

    To the OP.....awesome undertaking...I wish you all the best!

    Tact might not get through. Correction. It won't. Yesterday I saw a kid face down in his own blood, on the side walk on Milton St. in Flagstaff. Rescue people were just arriving. I don't think it was a life-threatening injury, though. Looked more like a car rode into him as it pulled out of Taco Bell. That happened to me once, only the driver got confused and put his foot on the gas rather than the brakes, and drove up and over my bike, while I kept rolling away from being squished.

    My angle is this: If you paid $50k to climb Everest in 1996, you were told that up to that time, there was a 1 in 6 chance you would die while trying to live your dream. You were told to be safe and turn back under certain circumstances. The problem is that people who invest a lot to attempt some major accomplishment, tend to be hard driven types who don't see the level of risk. Those '96 climbers thought they were prepared and they were very determined to succeed. That was their demise, along with getting a little fuzzy in the head from the altitude. Even after all the publicity about the fatalities, the same scenario played out again, on the same route, years later.

    I see someone riding their bike in the bike lane along route 66 each day. They are riding less than 30 feet from the wide paved urban trail that parallels the roadway. By choosing to ride within a few feet of motorized traffic rather than on that urban trail, the chances of them getting seriously injured probably increase from 1 in 20,000 to something closer to 1 in 500.

    What did the rider who got killed by the trash truck here in Flagstaff do so wrong? The truck killed him while moving at 3-5 mph. But the truck driver was turning and the rider got pinned and could not get out of the way.

    What is the risk factor riding a bike to Florida? Don't know. What is the risk factor riding to Florida on Interstate 10? Probably a lot more than on another route. But maybe it's less. On a 2 lane highway with no shoulder, you'd have to occupy a traffic lane when riding a trike with a trailer. The highway patrol will tell you that moving 5-10mph on a road where cars and trucks are moving 65mph is dangerous, very dangerous. Factor in the setting sun and drivers on cell phones, and the odds quickly move against the biker.

    On the other hand, more people survived climbing Everest than died climbing Everest. It all comes down to a persons comfort with risk vs. the pay-off.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    Tact might not get through. Correction. It won't. Yesterday I saw a kid face down in his own blood, on the side walk on Milton St. in Flagstaff. Rescue people were just arriving. I don't think it was a life-threatening injury, though. Looked more like a car rode into him as it pulled out of Taco Bell. That happened to me once, only the driver got confused and put his foot on the gas rather than the brakes, and drove up and over my bike, while I kept rolling away from being squished.

    My angle is this: If you paid $50k to climb Everest in 1996, you were told that up to that time, there was a 1 in 6 chance you would die while trying to live your dream. You were told to be safe and turn back under certain circumstances. The problem is that people who invest a lot to attempt some major accomplishment, tend to be hard driven types who don't see the level of risk. Those '96 climbers thought they were prepared and they were very determined to succeed. That was their demise, along with getting a little fuzzy in the head from the altitude. Even after all the publicity about the fatalities, the same scenario played out again, on the same route, years later.

    I see someone riding their bike in the bike lane along route 66 each day. They are riding less than 30 feet from the wide paved urban trail that parallels the roadway. By choosing to ride within a few feet of motorized traffic rather than on that urban trail, the chances of them getting seriously injured probably increase from 1 in 20,000 to something closer to 1 in 500.

    What did the rider who got killed by the trash truck here in Flagstaff do so wrong? The truck killed him while moving at 3-5 mph. But the truck driver was turning and the rider got pinned and could not get out of the way.

    What is the risk factor riding a bike to Florida? Don't know. What is the risk factor riding to Florida on Interstate 10? Probably a lot more than on another route. But maybe it's less. On a 2 lane highway with no shoulder, you'd have to occupy a traffic lane when riding a trike with a trailer. The highway patrol will tell you that moving 5-10mph on a road where cars and trucks are moving 65mph is dangerous, very dangerous. Factor in the setting sun and drivers on cell phones, and the odds quickly move against the biker.

    On the other hand, more people survived climbing Everest than died climbing Everest. It all comes down to a persons comfort with risk vs. the pay-off.
    So, now you're suggesting eating at Taco Bell is dangerous to bikers?

    How many of these bikers have taken the extra precaution to "be seen?" Can you please provide stats to support your claims that is a biker is 500 to 1 to be seriously injured if they chose to ride on the road. Or is this your personal opinion?
    Last edited by Casual Observer; 11-01-2011 at 11:24 AM.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbtcha View Post
    I actually have 2 flags, one as seen in the pic on the trike and the second is mounted to the axle of the trailing bike both have 5ft shafts. As far as total weight, right now a rough estimated weight with me on it is about 500 pounds, figuring 220 pounds for the load give or take a few pounds 80ish pounds for trike trailer and bike/muni, and 190 pounds for me. I think I will stop at the truck stop on the way out of town and get an exact weight.
    I have been rolling around town a bit on the trike with the trailer and a small load but haven't don any real serious long rides with it yet. The trailer pulls effortlessly untill you start climbing and then you have dead weight. on level ground I can honestly hardly tell it is back there and have to keep checking the mirror to be sure it is and since i put mountain gearing on the front instead of road, I will be able to just slowly grind up the worst of the hills as they come at me.
    Rob:

    I feel much better knowing you have three flags rather than my recommended two flags. Also since you are starting at about 2,000' and Florida is close to sea level it seems like the ride is mostly downhill. If you get a chance let us know the entire route, and I will put in the route into Topo Fusion to see if there is any uphill that might slow you down.

    Are we going to get any real time tracking of your progress? That would be cool watching you haul ass down the downhill sections. Do you have a solar panel to charge your batteries? Or you could put a generator on the front wheel of your recumbent so when you get to downhill sections you could flip the generator onto your front wheel.

    TD

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    Tact might not get through. Correction. It won't. Yesterday I saw a kid face down in his own blood, on the side walk on Milton St. in Flagstaff. Rescue people were just arriving. I don't think it was a life-threatening injury, though. Looked more like a car rode into him as it pulled out of Taco Bell. That happened to me once, only the driver got confused and put his foot on the gas rather than the brakes, and drove up and over my bike, while I kept rolling away from being squished.

    My angle is this: If you paid $50k to climb Everest in 1996, you were told that up to that time, there was a 1 in 6 chance you would die while trying to live your dream. You were told to be safe and turn back under certain circumstances. The problem is that people who invest a lot to attempt some major accomplishment, tend to be hard driven types who don't see the level of risk. Those '96 climbers thought they were prepared and they were very determined to succeed. That was their demise, along with getting a little fuzzy in the head from the altitude. Even after all the publicity about the fatalities, the same scenario played out again, on the same route, years later.

    I see someone riding their bike in the bike lane along route 66 each day. They are riding less than 30 feet from the wide paved urban trail that parallels the roadway. By choosing to ride within a few feet of motorized traffic rather than on that urban trail, the chances of them getting seriously injured probably increase from 1 in 20,000 to something closer to 1 in 500.

    What did the rider who got killed by the trash truck here in Flagstaff do so wrong? The truck killed him while moving at 3-5 mph. But the truck driver was turning and the rider got pinned and could not get out of the way.

    What is the risk factor riding a bike to Florida? Don't know. What is the risk factor riding to Florida on Interstate 10? Probably a lot more than on another route. But maybe it's less. On a 2 lane highway with no shoulder, you'd have to occupy a traffic lane when riding a trike with a trailer. The highway patrol will tell you that moving 5-10mph on a road where cars and trucks are moving 65mph is dangerous, very dangerous. Factor in the setting sun and drivers on cell phones, and the odds quickly move against the biker.

    On the other hand, more people survived climbing Everest than died climbing Everest. It all comes down to a persons comfort with risk vs. the pay-off.
    I guess to not make this all about the bad that can happen I have to say I have been riding bikes since I was 4 and motorcycles since I was 16. I have driven everything from a sub compact to an 18 wheeler. One thing I know for sure, I am the small guy on a bike and all I can do is make myself visible and pay attention to who's doing what and attempt not to put myself in a position where someone runs me over making a right turn. As for my route I am only following I-10 where I have to, if there are frontage roads or bike paths that is where I will be. Arizona and New Mexico have few options there though and only in some areas of cities. Once I get past El Paso, Texas, I will be saying goodbye to the freeway and be on country roads and working my way across the state through small towns north of I-10. There are routes for bikes that are safe and I have been doing my homework on this matter.

    I know the only one that can keep me safe is ME
    Zipper aka Rob

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    Best of luck to you! I will be following your amazing journey on FB!

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    I'm following his adventure on Facebook as well. Sometimes I wish I could quit my job, and take a few months off to ride across the USA. Have a great ride!

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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    ...since you are starting at about 2,000' and Florida is close to sea level it seems like the ride is mostly downhill.
    Except for that pesky little thing called the Continental Divide...
    "Nobody ever told me not to try" - Curious George Soundtrack by Jack Johnson

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbtcha View Post
    I guess to not make this all about the bad that can happen I have to say I have been riding bikes since I was 4 and motorcycles since I was 16. I have driven everything from a sub compact to an 18 wheeler. One thing I know for sure, I am the small guy on a bike and all I can do is make myself visible and pay attention to who's doing what and attempt not to put myself in a position where someone runs me over making a right turn. As for my route I am only following I-10 where I have to, if there are frontage roads or bike paths that is where I will be. Arizona and New Mexico have few options there though and only in some areas of cities. Once I get past El Paso, Texas, I will be saying goodbye to the freeway and be on country roads and working my way across the state through small towns north of I-10. There are routes for bikes that are safe and I have been doing my homework on this matter.

    I know the only one that can keep me safe is ME

    When my cousin and I were young, we dreamed of riding motorcycles from Argentina to Alaska. I mentioned this to a friend many years later and he suggested one of a thousand different scenarios that we probably had not considered.

    Suppose you are riding along a dirt road in the mountains near dusk, looking for a place to spend the night. You come to a border crossing. It is nothing more than a small guard shack and a simple street barricade. A young man, maybe 16 years old walks from the shack. He is holding an automatic weapon. You fumble for your papers. You glance over his shoulder and notice a picture thumb-tacked on the wall of his little shack. It is a picture of a Honda Transalp XL700V, just like the one you are riding. You suddenly realize that nobody else will likely pass this way for hours and your motorcycle is worth more than this kid makes in a lifetime. One squeeze on his trigger and he will live out his greatest dream. He need only shove your body over the hillside.

    One of my favorite Mickey Rourke movies is Body Heat. He has a small supporting part in it. William Hurt plays a man who wants to kill the husband of Kathleen Turner and cover the crime with arson. Mickey Rourke plays Teddy Lewis, an ex-con who William Hurt goes to for advice on how to pull off the crime. Here is the dialogue I remember the most;

    [Ned is getting the arson set-up from Teddy]
    Teddy Lewis: I got a serious question for you: What the f*** are you doing? This is not sh*t for you to be messin' with. Are you ready to hear something? I want you to see if this sounds familiar: any time you try a decent crime, you got fifty ways you're gonna f**k up. If you think of twenty-five of them, then you're a genius... and you ain't no genius. You remember who told me that?
    [Ned nods, "yes"]

    When you say that all you can do is make yourself visible, you are thinking of just of thing, out of dozens, that may save your life. Try coming up with more. A person at the traffic school I attended years ago was asked what decision he could make to be safer on the highway. He answered he would avoid driving through an Indian reservation on bingo night, when every other driver is drunk. It's a bit out there, but it might have some truth to it. And those highways you plan to ride down may not have a shoulder. You might be in a traffic lane, going up over a hill at 5mph, while others are coming up that hill behind you at 65mph. They might notice the bright colored flags and slow down and they might notice the flags and try to slow down and not quite slow down enough. From where they are sitting, you might look more like a pile of cargo boxes that fell off a truck, onto the roadway. Your trike and you may not be visible because of the cargo trailer.

    Las Vegas bookmakers might tell you that if someone did this exact trip ten times, they'd be hit and seriously injured one or two times. If you know those odds going in, and you've set aside some cash to cover hospital bills or funeral expenses, you may have the mother of all adventures. I hope angels will look over you and protect you.
    Last edited by The Prodigal Son; 11-04-2011 at 07:53 AM.

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    It's not you place to judge what he has plannned. Step off and let him live his life!
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casual Observer View Post
    So, now you're suggesting eating at Taco Bell is dangerous to bikers?

    How many of these bikers have taken the extra precaution to "be seen?" Can you please provide stats to support your claims that is a biker is 500 to 1 to be seriously injured if they chose to ride on the road. Or is this your personal opinion?
    I think hes saying Flag is dangerous to bikers....


    OP.. BADASS!!! Gonna have my wife add your facebook so we can watch your progress. I just came off a 32 mile overnighter and man that was a hell of a high... yours is an endeavor beyond my comprehension at this point! I hope you learn a lot about life and a little about yourself along the way!

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noelg View Post
    Except for that pesky little thing called the Continental Divide...
    Yes indeed, That Pesky Continental Divide.....
    Texas Canyon along I-10 is going to be one of the highest spots cresting at 4947 feet which i should hit around day 3. then there is El Paso that sits around 5000 feet and is in the beginning of what is called Texas hill country which will last until about the time I get to Austin, Texas.
    Zipper aka Rob

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle64 View Post
    It's not you place to judge what he has plannned. Step off and let him live his life!
    I was thinking the same thing, but his wacko posts are very entertaining.
    Regardless of the bizarre scenarios that TPS comes up with I bet Rob's journey will be a success in many ways. I hope I have the cojones to do something like this someday.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    When my cousin and I were young, we dreamed of riding motorcycles from Argentina to Alaska. I mentioned this to a friend many years later and he suggested one of a thousand different scenarios that we probably had not considered.

    Suppose you are riding along a dirt road in the mountains near dusk, looking for a place to spend the night. You come to a border crossing. It is nothing more than a small guard shack and a simple street barricade. A young man, maybe 16 years old walks from the shack. He is holding an automatic weapon. You fumble for your papers. You glance over his shoulder and notice a picture thumb-tacked on the wall of his little shack. It is a picture of a Honda Transalp XL700V, just like the one you are riding. You suddenly realize that nobody else will likely pass this way for hours and your motorcycle is worth more than this kid makes in a lifetime. One squeeze on his trigger and he will live our his greatest dream. He need only shove your body over the hillside.

    One of my favorite Mickey Rourke movies is Body Heat. He has a small supporting part in it. William Hurt plays a man who wants to kill the husband of Kathleen Turner and cover the crime with arson. Mickey Rourke plays Teddy Lewis, an ex-con who William Hurt goes to for advice on how to pull off the crime. Here is the dialogue I remember the most;

    [Ned is getting the arson set-up from Teddy]
    Teddy Lewis: I got a serious question for you: What the f*** are you doing? This is not sh*t for you to be messin' with. Are you ready to hear something? I want you to see if this sounds familiar: any time you try a decent crime, you got fifty ways you're gonna f**k up. If you think of twenty-five of them, then you're a genius... and you ain't no genius. You remember who told me that?
    [Ned nods, "yes"]

    When you say that all you can do is make yourself visible, you are thinking of just of thing, out of dozens, that may save your life. Try coming up with more. A person at the traffic school I attended years ago was asked what decision he could make to be safer on the highway. He answered he would avoid driving through an Indian reservation on bingo night, when every other driver is drunk. It's a bit out there, but it might have some truth to it. And those highways you plan to ride down may not have a shoulder. You might be in a traffic lane, going up over a hill at 5mph, while others are coming up that hill behind you at 65mph. They might notice the bright colored flags and slow down and they might notice the flags and try to slow down and not quite slow down enough. From where they are sitting, you might look more like a pile of cargo boxes that fell off a truck, onto the roadway. Your trike and you may not be visible because of the cargo trailer.

    Las Vegas bookmakers might tell you that if someone did this exact trip ten times, they'd be hit and seriously injured one or two times. If you know those odds going in, and you've set aside some cash to cover hospital bills or funeral expenses, you may have the mother of all adventures. I hope angels will look over you and protect you.
    TPS:

    When I read your original post I thought to myself you were reading my mind? How could that be? If the OP is badly injured (or worst) on this adventure we can all say he was doing what he loved to do. We are all going to have to face the BIG Lights Out Moment someday. Hopefully we will all get to enjoy his FB posts as he moves East.

    I use to Windsurf in the Columbia Gorge and went for a bike ride one day on the Washington side west of Bengin (Sp?). There was no shoulder just a metal guard rail to keep vehicles from going off the road into the river. It was cherry picking time and the trucks weren't yielding to any stupid biker like me, so I had to jump over the rail to keep from being killed or my left arm torn off. I hope there aren't any country roads were that might be the case. I would hate to have to try and lift a 500 lb. trailer over a 3' high guard rail in a matter of less than 10 seconds.

    It would be cool if the OP were to mount a video camera on the seat post of the bike he is towing. It would be a good training tool for future riders thinking of doing the same type of adventure. It would really be interesting video during high cross wind periods or when BIG trucks passed him within a couple feet.

    Texas is known for high thermal activity in the afternoon, and it can be real calm out before a massive thermal takes off. If there are lots of big cumulus clouds out watch out. Pull out the hang glider and go for a ride in the cloud street until things calm down.

    TD

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    Quote Originally Posted by chongoman View Post
    I was thinking the same thing, but his wacko posts are very entertaining.
    Regardless of the bizarre scenarios that TPS comes up with I bet Rob's journey will be a success in many ways. I hope I have the cojones to do something like this someday.
    People of his "sect" in society tend to spend far too much time judging, pontificating and worst case, trying to dictate what others do with their free will. He is amusing though.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    Las Vegas bookmakers might tell you that if someone did this exact trip ten times, they'd be hit and seriously injured one or two times. If you know those odds going in, and you've set aside some cash to cover hospital bills or funeral expenses, you may have the mother of all adventures. I hope angels will look over you and protect you.
    It's taken me a while, but I now know the trick: just jump to the last paragraph of your posts.


    Please show me where I can place a bet on this ride, or are you just making **** up again?
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

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    Not that I have any personal stake in this, or didnt just happen across it while looking at the "New Posts" feature. But, I have to give the OP a big hand, hes doing something most people wouldnt have the balls to do in a moving van, much less by bicycle.


    I wish you good luck and good fortune, may the people along your journey be helpful and supportive in any way. Dont let TPS's posts get you down, however take heed in the wisdom hidden in his cycnical delivery methods. Its dangerous, no way around that, protect yourself the best you can and may god and luck be on your side.
    2010 Giant Yukon FX
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  66. #66
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    Great News ! I just got word that I scored a GoPro its used but it should make for some interesting video running the wilds of the southern half of the country. Now just to figure out some inexpensive or free editing software that is decent and easy to use. If everything works out I will be able to edit videos from the day and then upload then when I have wifi, even though I know it will take a while to upload them. I think it will be interesting with the camera mounted to different parts of the rig during the trip. Special thanks to Lear Miller for having to have the latest and greatest GoPro for making this happen.
    Zipper aka Rob

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    Have a great and safe ride.

    May the road rise to meet you,
    May the wind be always at your back.
    May the sun shine warm upon your face,
    The rains fall soft upon your fields.
    And until we meet again,
    May God hold you in the palm of his hand.
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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHNIPE View Post
    I think hes saying Flag is dangerous to bikers....
    I thought he was saying bikes are dangerous to bikers...it's the constant in every bicycle accident ever. Hope the OP has a great time and look forward to seeing photo's and hearing stories!
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

  69. #69
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    good bye
    I was told there would be Cake

  70. #70
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    When are you leaving?

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazelem View Post
    When are you leaving?
    Scheduled for Sunday morning November 6th
    Zipper aka Rob

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    I am envious of your freedom to attempt an journey like this. I do implore you to find an alternate route south to Tucson. I would recommend this route, phoenix to tucson in Tempe, AZ | Bike Map | MapMyRIDE. Ride though Sun Lakes, Sacaton and Casa Grande instead of riding the free way. If you follow this route you will never have that unlawful and more dangerous ride on the freeway. I have taken it a few times my self, once a there and back in a 16 hour day. Good luck!

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbtcha View Post
    Great News ! I just got word that I scored a GoPro its used but it should make for some interesting video running the wilds of the southern half of the country. Now just to figure out some inexpensive or free editing software that is decent and easy to use. If everything works out I will be able to edit videos from the day and then upload then when I have wifi, even though I know it will take a while to upload them. I think it will be interesting with the camera mounted to different parts of the rig during the trip. Special thanks to Lear Miller for having to have the latest and greatest GoPro for making this happen.
    To hear some tell it, the video may also help the authorities in their investigation....

    Here's to a new and exciting chapter in your life.

  74. #74
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    good luck rob. i'm envious of your adventure.
    This is just need to know information: Am i supposed to enjoy the irony or pity the sincerity?

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    Hi Rob, best of luck to you. Saw you this morning on 48th street between warner and elliot. Ride safe!

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    An epic like that qualifies you to be an hornery Canuck.


    peddle On; avec prudence svp.
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    Not sure if he has addressed this before but what kind of gearing is the trike to be able to haul all of that stuff uphill? Isn't his tow load about 700 Lbs? What about braking and going downhill? I couldn't tell by the pictures but are there brakes on the trailer? Just wondering how that thing is going to get slowed down.

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    i see both sides and both are correct...to a point. esp about the rookie police going into training. how many rookies you think have died acting like a tv cop and such? but anyhow my point is theres nothing wrong warning about the dangers and possible dangers on such a ride. it is always better to plan and prepare for more things and not need them than it is to not prepare and need it. and on that note i hope he has a awesome ride but i for one wouldnt do it well at least not in arizona unless its oddly cool/cold cause its too frigging hot here normally good luck and have fun

    edit: oh and im going now to sub to his trip

  79. #79
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    At over 475 lbs of load being pushed back and forth on the connector point between the bike and the trailer it will be interesting if that could create a problem at some point?

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    depends really on the max weight on the trailer but i dont think it will be as it should flow pretty well

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    Quote Originally Posted by gillotte View Post
    depends really on the max weight on the trailer but i dont think it will be as it should flow pretty well
    So the total load is 740 lbs., so how does that equate to the forces on the trailer connector during uphill and downhill load situations.
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  82. #82
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    Up Hills are painful and slow, Down Hills are nerve racking an worry some but that's why they call it an adventure. Its not the hills that are the problem right now though, its all the construction along I-10 and the fact that my phone went ca-puts today
    Zipper aka Rob

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    I am revisiting this thread to say it was a good decision to end the ride. I'm glad he had a dream, and that it was a big one, a difficult one. My wife is like that. She was among the first to ride the AZ Trail from Utah to Mexico, 810 miles. I tried very hard to talk her out of it. Her load was about 100 pounds on a B.O.B. trailer and I felt it would make the journey very difficult and unpleasant. It did but she and her friend Andrea were determined and they made it. On her attempt to ride the Great Divide Trail from Canada to Mexico, she bailed out after less than 600 miles due to an inflamed I.T. band. I was glad to see it end without something worse happening. I am glad Rob called it quits when he did. He can now recover and dream up something new. I hope his friends and family support him and also press him to prepare well for his next adventure.

    What I thought was odd, both before and after this trip began and ended, was how little people said to help the guy prepare better. Nobody suggested hauling a 500 pound around the valley a half-dozen times on 50-100 miles test rides. Nobody asked if he had done any rides pulling this load up and down grades. Trail Doc was the only person who suggested the connection between the heavily loaded trailer and the trike would be under enormous stress. I realize few here have attempted to haul that much weight behind a recumbent, but it had to strike most people as beyond the limits of the brakes and extremely dangerous going down hills.

    So it sounded like the trip ended in Casa Grande after 3 or 4 days. It seems that road construction was a problem that forced him off the highway. It sounded like crossing a bridge with no shoulder caused another problem. This happened within a short distance of the start of the ride. It seemed odd that a trip of 2700 miles +/- ended after whatever, 40 miles or so, with no idea how road construction or shoulderless bridges could factor in. But mostly, the trip required a huge amount of fitness. Not just fitness from doing 10-20 mile rides on a mountain bike but fitness from pulling a 500 pound load around for months on long rides. I can't understand why nobody made these observations or suggestions in hopes of insuring a better chance of completing the trip. What I took away from the initial posts of well-wishers was they were like a group gathered under a tall building watching someone standing on a ledge at the top of the building, preparing to jump with some home-made wings strapped on their arms. They all give him the thumbs up sign and wish him luck.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    I can't understand why nobody made these observations or suggestions in hopes of insuring a better chance of completing the trip.
    Because unlike you,most people don't make it their life's work telling people how to live their lives. Preach away blow-hard.

    p.s. I don't recall him asking for advice either. People of a certain segment in life can't help but give their unsolicited prescription for how others should live their lives , can they?

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    I am revisiting this thread to say it was a good decision to end the ride. I'm glad he had a dream, and that it was a big one, a difficult one. My wife is like that. She was among the first to ride the AZ Trail from Utah to Mexico, 810 miles. I tried very hard to talk her out of it. Her load was about 100 pounds on a B.O.B. trailer and I felt it would make the journey very difficult and unpleasant. It did but she and her friend Andrea were determined and they made it. On her attempt to ride the Great Divide Trail from Canada to Mexico, she bailed out after less than 600 miles due to an inflamed I.T. band. I was glad to see it end without something worse happening. I am glad Rob called it quits when he did. He can now recover and dream up something new. I hope his friends and family support him and also press him to prepare well for his next adventure.

    What I thought was odd, both before and after this trip began and ended, was how little people said to help the guy prepare better. Nobody suggested hauling a 500 pound around the valley a half-dozen times on 50-100 miles test rides. Nobody asked if he had done any rides pulling this load up and down grades. Trail Doc was the only person who suggested the connection between the heavily loaded trailer and the trike would be under enormous stress. I realize few here have attempted to haul that much weight behind a recumbent, but it had to strike most people as beyond the limits of the brakes and extremely dangerous going down hills.

    So it sounded like the trip ended in Casa Grande after 3 or 4 days. It seems that road construction was a problem that forced him off the highway. It sounded like crossing a bridge with no shoulder caused another problem. This happened within a short distance of the start of the ride. It seemed odd that a trip of 2700 miles +/- ended after whatever, 40 miles or so, with no idea how road construction or shoulderless bridges could factor in. But mostly, the trip required a huge amount of fitness. Not just fitness from doing 10-20 mile rides on a mountain bike but fitness from pulling a 500 pound load around for months on long rides. I can't understand why nobody made these observations or suggestions in hopes of insuring a better chance of completing the trip. What I took away from the initial posts of well-wishers was they were like a group gathered under a tall building watching someone standing on a ledge at the top of the building, preparing to jump with some home-made wings strapped on their arms. They all give him the thumbs up sign and wish him luck.
    Sooooo, I guess the obvious question then is, why didn't YOU make these suggestions to him?
    "Don't feel bad. A lot of people have no talent"

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunerinaz View Post
    Sooooo, I guess the obvious question then is, why didn't YOU make these suggestions to him?
    hah, I'm sure he'll respond to you in just under 2000 words. Getting to the point is not his strong suit.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    I am revisiting this thread to say it was a good decision to end the ride. I'm glad he had a dream, and that it was a big one, a difficult one. My wife is like that. She was among the first to ride the AZ Trail from Utah to Mexico, 810 miles. I tried very hard to talk her out of it. Her load was about 100 pounds on a B.O.B. trailer and I felt it would make the journey very difficult and unpleasant. It did but she and her friend Andrea were determined and they made it. On her attempt to ride the Great Divide Trail from Canada to Mexico, she bailed out after less than 600 miles due to an inflamed I.T. band. I was glad to see it end without something worse happening. I am glad Rob called it quits when he did. He can now recover and dream up something new. I hope his friends and family support him and also press him to prepare well for his next adventure.

    What I thought was odd, both before and after this trip began and ended, was how little people said to help the guy prepare better. Nobody suggested hauling a 500 pound around the valley a half-dozen times on 50-100 miles test rides. Nobody asked if he had done any rides pulling this load up and down grades. Trail Doc was the only person who suggested the connection between the heavily loaded trailer and the trike would be under enormous stress. I realize few here have attempted to haul that much weight behind a recumbent, but it had to strike most people as beyond the limits of the brakes and extremely dangerous going down hills.

    So it sounded like the trip ended in Casa Grande after 3 or 4 days. It seems that road construction was a problem that forced him off the highway. It sounded like crossing a bridge with no shoulder caused another problem. This happened within a short distance of the start of the ride. It seemed odd that a trip of 2700 miles +/- ended after whatever, 40 miles or so, with no idea how road construction or shoulderless bridges could factor in. But mostly, the trip required a huge amount of fitness. Not just fitness from doing 10-20 mile rides on a mountain bike but fitness from pulling a 500 pound load around for months on long rides. I can't understand why nobody made these observations or suggestions in hopes of insuring a better chance of completing the trip. What I took away from the initial posts of well-wishers was they were like a group gathered under a tall building watching someone standing on a ledge at the top of the building, preparing to jump with some home-made wings strapped on their arms. They all give him the thumbs up sign and wish him luck.
    I agree, a lot of rude people here that don't value life. It's disgusting and I pray for them.
    I tried to stop him so many times. He's really strong in the brain and everywhere else. When he left, I cried for days. The lord clearly intervened here and I'm so happy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tmarkos View Post
    I agree, a lot of rude people here that don't value life. It's disgusting and I pray for them.
    I tried to stop him so many times. He's really strong in the brain and everywhere else. When he left, I cried for days. The lord clearly intervened here and I'm so happy.
    I think it was the already bad knees that intervened but whatever floats your boat...

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnio View Post
    I think it was the already bad knees that intervened but whatever floats your boat...
    Tony is just sassin'.
    Getting a dropper post is like getting a bidet. I didn't know I needed one until I get one and boy, does my ass thank me.

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    I can't understand why nobody made these observations or suggestions in hopes of insuring a better chance of completing the trip. What I took away from the initial posts of well-wishers was they were like a group gathered under a tall building watching someone standing on a ledge at the top of the building, preparing to jump with some home-made wings strapped on their arms. They all give him the thumbs up sign and wish him luck.
    I can't speak for anyone but myself and since I was a "well-wisher" I feel as though I should respond. Here is how I look at the situation differently than you.

    Here is what I know of Robert: I know Robert from riding South Mountain, more specifically shuttling South Mountain. I do lots of trail rides on Somo and I'm sure he does too but we never really hooked up on trail rides. Therefore, I don't really know too much about his fitness level (and certainly nothing about his road biking prowess) . What I do know is that he's a grown man with a solid head on his shoulders. Another thing that I know nothing about is towing a trailer with a recumbant. Sure 500 lbs sounds like a hell of a lot but I really wouldn't know.

    So when it came to wishing Robert well I did so on here, Facebook, and even joined him for the "send off" ride. He seemed to have thought everything out and made had no illusions about making a quick trip of it. Why would I question someone who had researched, planned, and knew far more about cross country trekking than myself? Here is a person who is passionate about riding and had a dream to do something big. This should be celebrated not frowned upon. Maybe he would have made it if his knee wouldn't have blown up? Maybe not? I don't know. How the hell do you seem to know so much?

    Your analogy about standing on a rooftop with home made wings is pure idiocy. You are acting as though it was a do-or-die mission. He had food, water, shelter, cellphone, and a gun for effs sake. What was going to happen on that trip that can't happen on a shorter ride? Would you have the same reaction if he had posted that he was planning a ride to Tucson?

    Since he first posted about his trip you have been on here preaching about how it's a bad idea, too risky, etc. You went on and on with your typical novel like posts and in reality you knew next to nothing about the person who was actually planning the trip and now you're bashing the people who wished him well. You remind me of the stereotypical bitter old man who sits on his porch yelling at the neighborhood kids all day.

    Oh, one more thing. This post probably exceeds by 10 times the longest post I've ever put up on mtbr. Evidently you dribble is contagious.

    eabos
    JRA

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    Quote Originally Posted by tmarkos View Post
    I agree, a lot of rude people here that don't value life. It's disgusting and I pray for them.
    I tried to stop him so many times. He's really strong in the brain and everywhere else. When he left, I cried for days. The lord clearly intervened here and I'm so happy.

    At least someone has some wisdom around here. Thank you Tmarkos for understanding the lords strength

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post

    So it sounded like the trip ended in Casa Grande after 3 or 4 days. It seems that road construction was a problem that forced him off the highway. It sounded like crossing a bridge with no shoulder caused another problem. This happened within a short distance of the start of the ride. It seemed odd that a trip of 2700 miles +/- ended after whatever, 40 miles or so, with no idea how road construction or shoulderless bridges could factor in. But mostly, the trip required a huge amount of fitness. Not just fitness from doing 10-20 mile rides on a mountain bike but fitness from pulling a 500 pound load around for months on long rides. I can't understand why nobody made these observations or suggestions in hopes of insuring a better chance of completing the trip. What I took away from the initial posts of well-wishers was they were like a group gathered under a tall building watching someone standing on a ledge at the top of the building, preparing to jump with some home-made wings strapped on their arms. They all give him the thumbs up sign and wish him luck.
    This is very funny coming from a guy that went into a forest fire a while back to take pictures. You clearly lacked common sense in that instance, yet you blather on and on here about Zipper's sensibilities.
    You have lots to say, but rarely post anything on here about anything positive or good. All you do is criticize. Doesn't it get exhausting?
    Sure it seemed over-the-top and many things were likely to go wrong, but trying to do something interesting is way better than sitting in front a computer and being critical and mean spirited.
    be nice man! It's a way better way to go through life.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnio View Post
    I think it was the already bad knees that intervened but whatever floats your boat...
    I was kind of wondering why he was using the recumbent rather than a regular bike, so he had bad knees, that explains that part. I know a guy who travels over 750 miles each year as a HAPPILY HOMELESS person towing a bob trailer with 60 lbs. in it. He told me every pound makes a BIG difference. On head wind days he just camps out rather than fight it.

    It's hard to understand where Robert came up with the idea that he could pull so much weight uphill for over a thousand miles unless he planned on taking short distances each day.

    TD

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    So the total load is 740 lbs., so how does that equate to the forces on the trailer connector during uphill and downhill load situations.
    Is that a cigarette in his hand?

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    When my cousin and I were young, we dreamed of riding motorcycles from Argentina to Alaska. I mentioned this to a friend many years later and he suggested one of a thousand different scenarios that we probably had not considered.

    Suppose you are riding along a dirt road in the mountains near dusk, looking for a place to spend the night. You come to a border crossing. It is nothing more than a small guard shack and a simple street barricade. A young man, maybe 16 years old walks from the shack. He is holding an automatic weapon. You fumble for your papers. You glance over his shoulder and notice a picture thumb-tacked on the wall of his little shack. It is a picture of a Honda Transalp XL700V, just like the one you are riding. You suddenly realize that nobody else will likely pass this way for hours and your motorcycle is worth more than this kid makes in a lifetime. One squeeze on his trigger and he will live out his greatest dream. He need only shove your body over the hillside.

    One of my favorite Mickey Rourke movies is Body Heat. He has a small supporting part in it. William Hurt plays a man who wants to kill the husband of Kathleen Turner and cover the crime with arson. Mickey Rourke plays Teddy Lewis, an ex-con who William Hurt goes to for advice on how to pull off the crime. Here is the dialogue I remember the most;

    [Ned is getting the arson set-up from Teddy]
    Teddy Lewis: I got a serious question for you: What the f*** are you doing? This is not sh*t for you to be messin' with. Are you ready to hear something? I want you to see if this sounds familiar: any time you try a decent crime, you got fifty ways you're gonna f**k up. If you think of twenty-five of them, then you're a genius... and you ain't no genius. You remember who told me that?
    [Ned nods, "yes"]

    When you say that all you can do is make yourself visible, you are thinking of just of thing, out of dozens, that may save your life. Try coming up with more. A person at the traffic school I attended years ago was asked what decision he could make to be safer on the highway. He answered he would avoid driving through an Indian reservation on bingo night, when every other driver is drunk. It's a bit out there, but it might have some truth to it. And those highways you plan to ride down may not have a shoulder. You might be in a traffic lane, going up over a hill at 5mph, while others are coming up that hill behind you at 65mph. They might notice the bright colored flags and slow down and they might notice the flags and try to slow down and not quite slow down enough. From where they are sitting, you might look more like a pile of cargo boxes that fell off a truck, onto the roadway. Your trike and you may not be visible because of the cargo trailer.

    Las Vegas bookmakers might tell you that if someone did this exact trip ten times, they'd be hit and seriously injured one or two times. If you know those odds going in, and you've set aside some cash to cover hospital bills or funeral expenses, you may have the mother of all adventures. I hope angels will look over you and protect you.
    Sounds like a bad case of the What if's! Some let fear get the best of em, others like to wrap a harness around that fear and live their dreams. It's now wonder that those too afraid to send it will criticise those that go for it. I too wouldn't ride the way you described through those 3rd world countries and I sure as hell don't trust drivers on the roads and I guess it's not enough of my dream to override those fears but it sure is inspiring that it is someones dream and they are going for it!

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubo View Post
    Is that a cigarette in his hand?
    thats funny.

  97. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by kubo View Post
    Is that a cigarette in his hand?
    Nice catch
    I dig dirt!

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    Quote Originally Posted by chongoman View Post
    This is very funny coming from a guy that went into a forest fire a while back to take pictures. You clearly lacked common sense in that instance, yet you blather on and on here about Zipper's sensibilities.
    You have lots to say, but rarely post anything on here about anything positive or good. All you do is criticize. Doesn't it get exhausting?
    Sure it seemed over-the-top and many things were likely to go wrong, but trying to do something interesting is way better than sitting in front a computer and being critical and mean spirited.
    be nice man! It's a way better way to go through life.
    It's not exhausting, but it's not a good use of free time. A lot of people, including the Forest Service LEO's, misunderstood the pictures taken during the Schultz fire. The info I had on day two was that the fire was 2-3 miles north of Mt. Elden. I rode up The Heart Trail and was planning to ride halfway down Little Bear to take photos from a very safe distance, and quickly found out some of the fire backed up the mountain, in my path. I would say that years as a police officer and then as a prison guard were much more life-threatening. But your point is well taken. There are better ways to go through life.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son View Post
    When my cousin and I were young, we dreamed of riding motorcycles from Argentina to Alaska. I mentioned this to a friend many years later and he suggested one of a thousand different scenarios that we probably had not considered.

    Suppose you are riding along a dirt road in the mountains near dusk, looking for a place to spend the night. You come to a border crossing. It is nothing more than a small guard shack and a simple street barricade. A young man, maybe 16 years old walks from the shack. He is holding an automatic weapon. You fumble for your papers. You glance over his shoulder and notice a picture thumb-tacked on the wall of his little shack. It is a picture of a Honda Transalp XL700V, just like the one you are riding. You suddenly realize that nobody else will likely pass this way for hours and your motorcycle is worth more than this kid makes in a lifetime. One squeeze on his trigger and he will live out his greatest dream. He need only shove your body over the hillside..
    I have a friend that rode his 400cc Honda motorcycle all around the world. He rode it to
    the southern tip of South America to Newfoundland, across to Alaska. He rode through Europe, Africa, all the countries that end in "stan", Asia, and Russia. He rode it in Australia and New Zealand. Multiple times. He did it all with nothing more than people that were happy to see him doing something big, something that really made him feel good inside. Did he have hardships while traveling? Yes. He was dehydrated several times, caught little colds and other bugs, and said he spent a month peeing out his butt after he got home. He told stories of running into the wrong people in the middle of nowhere, and walking away from it all.

    I think your story of the armed guard and all is just another American nightmare. This is the reason why most American's are afraid to venture outside of the borders. There's only more people on the other side, ya know. Sure, maybe they look a little different or speak a different language, but they're still just people. Remember how much that point mattered when the OP was just going to FL. In case you don't own a map there's no country borders to cross on the path.

    I guess what I am saying, is that rather than point out anything and everything bad that can happen, look at the adventure that somebody else might be venturing out on. In other words, don't piss in their Cheerio's.

    You're on a mountain bike forum. There are certain risks you take no matter what trails or roads you ride, but you do it anyways. Nobody tells you not to bike, nobody says "Don't ride that trail" or "Don't take that line".

    The only other thing (other than being a scaredy cat) I can think of is that your jealous. You're jealous of the OP and the adventure he set out on. Sure, he may have bailed before he got out of the state, but you're jealous of his sense of adventure, of his attachment, or lack there of, and/or his testicular fortitude to embark on such a journey.

    To the OP: Way to go! I know you didn't make it anywhere near your final destination, but you did try what very few would. If only everybody had the balls to even think about attempting the trip you did...
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you’ll crash.
    - Julie Furtado

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    Glad your friend was alright in his trips. Youre both right and wrong about traveling. Sure it could possibly happen the way The Prodigal Son said or it could go the way woheys friends experience did. Yes theyre just people whether a different color or speak a different language but that doesnt mean bad sh*t doesnt happen and while not often happens to much. So take precautions and try to be as safe as you can be but dont let What ifs...? stop you simply because theyre What ifs. There are pretty much always ways to lessen risks in travel(barring accidents and things out of anyones control).

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