Spot Belt Drive SS- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Spot Belt Drive SS

    Anyone else checked out the Spot Belt Drive SS bikes at Rage? If I were into SS riding I think I might want to see how these belt drives system work. I like SS riding so don't think I'm anti SS. My knee is the one that does not like SS riding!
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    Sounds as if Spot has already worked out the initial kinks in the system. I think many people were waiting to buy the non-first generation belt systems. The first generation squeeked. Now the rings and cogs are teflon coated. The first gen frames had minimal tire clearance which is reportedly corrected.

    I think it's pretty cool. Too bad my Spot doesn't have the keyed dropout or I'd try it.

  3. #3
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    I'm not sure the specific name of the belt system. Rage just has two on the floor which happen to be on Spot frames.
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  4. #4
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    Vapor ware? I have a frame that is a perfect application for the belt. Be interested once it is available (if ever).

  5. #5
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    Looks similar to this but the rear cog is a little different.

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  6. #6
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    I just can't believe how awesome this is. Seems like the belt is a great idea for offroad. Now for the transmission, we're gold.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Vapor ware? I have a frame that is a perfect application for the belt. Be interested once it is available (if ever).
    Give Ed a call. Spot has everything in stock from what I've heard. I think it's only a couple hundred bucks for the belt, cog and ring. The only catch is getting the belt on your bike. If you have a way to unbolt your seat stay from the dropout, you're golden.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roverbiker
    The only catch is getting the belt on your bike. If you have a way to unbolt your seat stay from the dropout, you're golden.
    Indeed I do.

    Called Spot. They have them, but only if you like to ride 32X19. Other ratios, you are out of luck. Maybe in a year or so.

    Around $230.

  9. #9
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    I stopped by Rage on the way home. I was told the gearing is about 2 to 1 which would be close to the 32x19 stated. The rear drop out on the Spot splits for the belt and a metal plate used to hold the rear drop out together.

    Couple crappy cell phone shots.



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  10. #10
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    Whoah slow your roll people. how do we know its awesome? what are the advantages besides being different? No good for duallys unless you have a belt tensioner. When the belt breaks how do you fix it? hub transmissions are way expensive and not durable or efficient. chains work fine.

    As a fool who bought one of those ktrak snow bike kits (SUUUUUUCKED) I have a healthy distrust for belts and those who promote them.

  11. #11
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    A healthy amount of skepticism is prudent, but I have to say... I've broken numerous chains on bicycles and an assortment of motorcycles, but the belt drive on my 1340cc Harley is 21 years old now and has never needed any maintenance or replacement.

    I think the belt drive folks pretty much have it figured out by now.

    And for me, that right there would be the advantage of a belt drive bicycle: I could wrench on my bike even less frequently than I do now.

    I wouldn't want a belt drive on anything other than a single speed. Of course, I wouldn't want anything other than a single speed anyway.

    Greg

  12. #12
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    I worked as an industrial electrician for over 13 years and all the drive motors we had used the same type of belt drives. These were motors pushing up to 500 hp and it was very rare to see a belt break. As for the snow trak, Dang! I actually wanted to get one of those for a cruiser ride thing (just to be weird). Did it not work at all?
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  13. #13
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    How's that belt going to hold up to the AZ heat???
    "Nobody ever told me not to try" - Curious George Soundtrack by Jack Johnson

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    It was like riding in very deep sand . Traction was no problem, it was floatation/drive train drag that made it not work. It would be better at a ski hill, on packed powder going down, but in these conditions all you need is a big set of snow tires anyway. Also the thing made my 26 lb bike weigh 47 lbs. And ride like a wheelbarrow. Dumped it on ebay asap. What tore it was having to pedal down the hill i just pushed the thing up.

  15. #15
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    I'm really interested in this system. If I didn't love my current ride, I'd seriously check one out. Next time I'm in the market for another SS, I'll definitely look at these. Not having to worry about chain breakage or creaking...priceless!
    Why would I need more than one gear?
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  16. #16
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    Hey pal I'll get some better images of this setup. I charged my camera and need to stop but Rage and pick up my twin rail tiresfor my Niner/commuter bike.
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  17. #17
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    Saw these at Rage last night. These bikes are way cool. The whole belt drive thing is kind of intriguing.

  18. #18
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by AKA Monkeybutt
    Saw these at Rage last night. These bikes are way cool. The whole belt drive thing is kind of intriguing.
    That's the way I looked at it. It may not be the greatest thing since sliced bread. But it is interesting checking out a different approach. Did you notice how the rear drop out split apart as to allow a belt to slide through.

    PS: Nice Sultan!
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by trb2929

    PS: Nice Sultan!

    Thanks

  20. #20
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    Stoped by Rage picked up some tires and shot a few images.









    This is what I think is interesting. Rear drop out splits so the belt can feed through.

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  21. #21
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    i think if it can work in your engine, which generates several hundred times more power than you can ever muster or on a motorcycle, it can work on a bike.

    i'd really want to give that a try, because it looks sweet as hell.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noelg
    How's that belt going to hold up to the AZ heat???
    probably the same way the belts in your car's engine hold up to several hundred degrees every day.

  23. #23
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    There's some talk on blogs from people who tried them at Interbike about these slipping and needing high belt tension (more friction) to keep from slipping.

    A more relevant comparison would be dirt bikes or quads..are any using open belts?

    Would someone buy one and ride the crap out of it and report back?

  24. #24
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    Guys at Rage said they have sold a few. So someone is out there testing it. When I started this thread it was because I thought it was an interesting design. We can throw out analogies all day, have you seen a chain on a blower of a top fuel dragster lately? Few more HP on one of those than a Quad. But I agree it's a different setup and should be field tested to see how well it performs.
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  25. #25
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    Anyone ever hear of Steve Fassbinder, Spot-sponsored rider?



    *Three-time World 24-Hour Solo Champ.
    *Just got third in the 2009 World Champs last weekend.
    *24-Hour Solo Mountain Bike Racer Hall of Fame.
    *Likes to do 150-mile jaunts through the San Juans for fun.

    He rides a Spot with belt drive. I'd say he's put it through its paces.

  26. #26
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    Not hating the idea, just cautious about change for sake of change (is it an improvement over chain/sprockets or just different?) The strength of a belt obviously isn't an issue, good examples given. I'd be more interested in how long the sprockets last in the offroad environment as they look to be non-metal. Also already know how much it costs to freshen a chain drive, how does a belt setup compare?

    Spot's website is down so no help there.

  27. #27
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    Spot's website is down even when it's up.

    They need to hire a talented webinator, for sure.

    I'm not a huge belt drive proponent. I might try one some day if I'm replacing my drive train while someone waves a belt drive under my nose. But I would say that the major advantage of the system, for someone like me who would rather ride than wrench, is that you don't have to lube or clean a belt.

    Significantly decreased wrenching time is one of my top 5 reasons for riding a single speed. If I could decrease my monthly time spent wrenching from 20 minutes to 5, I'd probably be sold on a belt drive.

    Greg

  28. #28
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    The sprockets are metal (aluminum) with a teflon coating. They do look a bit different but it's due to the surface (it's not polished like chainrings can be).
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  29. #29
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    Oh, I see.. This is a single speed thing, not a real mountain bike type setup.

    p.s I live under a bridge. Can't help it.

  30. #30
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    That's funny. You thought we were talking about real mountain biking. Honest mistake. No we were talking about pretend mountain biking on a single speed.

    (just razzing you here ^^^.)

  31. #31
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    Would it work with a Rohloff? That'd take care of the transmission problem.

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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velokid1
    That's funny. You thought we were talking about real mountain biking. Honest mistake. No we were talking about pretend mountain biking on a single speed.

    (just razzing you here ^^^.)

    I think ggnarl needs to take a loop up 396 with the Triplets from Spotsville and he will find out what is "real" mountain biking...right Brit?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velokid1
    Significantly decreased wrenching time is one of my top 5 reasons for riding a single speed. If I could decrease my monthly time spent wrenching from 20 minutes to 5, I'd probably be sold on a belt drive.

    Greg
    This is a big reason I went SS. I used to wrench a lot, even like it but now with two kids, less wrench time is a priority.

    Oh, and I like pain. That's the second reason I prefer SSing.
    Why would I need more than one gear?
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  34. #34
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    O.K,OK, I just miss the good old days, before the decline of the sport, you know before things got weird. I was thinkin 'bout this last night, and you got a belt right? Belts are made of some kind of fiber, like Kevlar, covered in rubber. Granted the fiber might not be stretchy but the rubber covering it is soft and will have a certain amount of give to it. I am sure it feels fine to ride, but you are going to lose efficiency to that rubber, no way around it. also the belt has to be relatively tight to avoid play, this will increase drive line drag also. Internal geared hubs are less efficient than a cog set up especially in the lowest gear due to the small size of the gears.This is well known. also they are expensive and less durable. I guess i just don't understand the dislike of bike maintenance. I have always loved goofing with my bike.

  35. #35
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB
    This is a big reason I went SS. I used to wrench a lot, even like it but now with two kids, less wrench time is a priority.

    Oh, and I like pain. That's the second reason I prefer SSing.
    I set my X9 derailleurs months ago and think I have adjusted them once since then. I spend more time checking air in the tires. I like taking care of my equipment SS or geared. So wrenching on a bike does not bother me at all.

    PS: Guess you need a fix geared for the road then!
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  36. #36
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    The question that hasn't been answered is...Is a belt drive better by any measure than a chain drive?

    I get the attraction a rigid 29er SS (fixie) rider would have for belt drive

    I don't get the not wanting to wrench part, for me working on bikes is as much a part of biking as riding them.

  37. #37
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    Okay I just demoed one up here in Crested Butte. Alpineer has 3 Spot demos (S, M, L...guess which one I rode) Just took a spin around town, didn't get on any dirt.

    Feels like...a chain.

    The guy at Alpineer said they just got a shipment of new freewheels from Spot for the demos, apparantly the ones they came with were faulty.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by going29AZ
    I think ggnarl needs to take a loop up 396 with the Triplets from Spotsville and he will find out what is "real" mountain biking...right Brit?
    You bet. Nothing like climbing out of the saddle for miles on end to show someone about real mountain biking. The Soul Boys dont need no belts, there chains work plenty well enough as it is. They dont need any more help!!

    Quads were definetly sore for a couple of days after that one. Plus my SOMO local trails feel a little harsh after the beautiful Prescott trails!!

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjeff

    I don't get the not wanting to wrench part, for me working on bikes is as much a part of biking as riding them.
    For anyone with the luxury of having extra time and a choice in how they spend it, I can relate to that. But for me- a guy with a wife, mortgage, 6 yr old and newborn- the lack of maintenance is pretty attractive. Particularly after a decade of wrenching professionally.

    I don't mind turning a wrench on my SS for 1 hour a month, but I'm not going to invite more maintenance by running a bike with gears and suspension that I don't need.

    At any rate, belt drive on a bicycle: I don't think anyone (except for some of us forum jockeys online) has claimed it was some revolutionary shift in paradigms for the bicycle world. But I will tell you after sitting around in bike shops for 15 years that the more forward-thinking of my colleagues have spent many hours wondering when the industry would finally come up with an improvement for the link chain and derailleurs on bicycles.

    All other bicycle technologies have improved in significant ways over the past 20 years but the chain-driven bicycle drivetrain has seen very little improvement. It remains vulnerable to damage and to dirt... high-maintenance... over-engineered... ugly. Whether it's the belt or not, something is eventually going to replace the bicycle chain. It's the obvious weak link (pun intended) of the bicycle.

    Greg

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by BritMtnBiker
    The Soul Boys dont need no belts, there chains work plenty well enough as it is. They dont need any more help!!
    Thanks for the compliments, boys, but you do know you're putting a huge bullseye on our backs, don't ya? And I can't ride nearly fast enough to keep people from hitting the center.

    Quote Originally Posted by BritMtnBiker
    Quads were definetly sore for a couple of days after that one. Plus my SOMO local trails feel a little harsh after the beautiful Prescott trails!!
    Not harsh... "technical."

    When you come up again, PM me so we can meet up. Me and my pretend mtn bike are back East/home for the next 2 weeks, btw.

    Greg

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjeff
    The question that hasn't been answered is...Is a belt drive better by any measure than a chain drive?

    I get the attraction a rigid 29er SS (fixie) rider would have for belt drive

    I don't get the not wanting to wrench part, for me working on bikes is as much a part of biking as riding them.
    According to Spot, there are several advantages. 1) The belt will outlast any chain according to them and their tests. 2) No lube, no cleaning. 3) The sprokets and rings are suggested to last longer as well. 4) The system carries less slack. Imagine the slack from a semi-loose chain on a freehub with crummy PAWLS. Now imagine a belt drive with immediate hookup due to zero slack. Lastly, I've been told the system is really silent and clean feeling.

    The advantages seem obvious enough to me. Does it deliver? Who knows.
    Last edited by Roverbiker; 08-19-2008 at 09:02 PM.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggnarl
    O.K,OK, I just miss the good old days, before the decline of the sport, you know before things got weird. I was thinkin 'bout this last night, and you got a belt right? Belts are made of some kind of fiber, like Kevlar, covered in rubber. Granted the fiber might not be stretchy but the rubber covering it is soft and will have a certain amount of give to it. I am sure it feels fine to ride, but you are going to lose efficiency to that rubber, no way around it. also the belt has to be relatively tight to avoid play, this will increase drive line drag also. Internal geared hubs are less efficient than a cog set up especially in the lowest gear due to the small size of the gears.This is well known. also they are expensive and less durable. I guess i just don't understand the dislike of bike maintenance. I have always loved goofing with my bike.
    Actually, one of the advantages of belts in general is the lack of "stretchiness" for lack of a better term. As for mechanical drag in an internal hub, mechanical drag is a red herring. This new ceramic bearing mania is really far fetched. The difference in drag (relative to watts) between a really smooth hub and one filled with crunchy bearings is actually very, very slight. We're talking a matter of a second or two over 24 miles on a road bike. You probably have more drag from the knobs on your shoes in the wind.

  43. #43
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    If this belt drive provides less power to the back wheel, it's nothing something that would appeal to me.

    It would be interesting to see the results of a comparison of two bikes with the same gear ratio: one with a conventional chain drive, and the other with a belt. To each of them you would provide a consistent, repeatable amount of power to the cranks, and measure the power output at the back wheel.

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  44. #44
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    i agree that the belt should be pretty stable, strong and durable.

    Do those cranks look super short? bad angle maybe?

    My concern with the belt is the normal early adopter issue, of product availability and support.

    Spot is the only source of belts, cranks and rear cogs. What if they stop making them? I have a Spot SS hub that broke an axel. Took a lot of work to replace, and spot told me I was lucky, because I got the last axel they could find. They have only been out of hubs for 2 years or so.

    So if this doesn't take off to multiple manufacturers, you could have a useless bike (unless it can convert back to chain) if Spot decides to bail on it.
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  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roverbiker
    Imagine the slack from a semi-loose chain on a freehub with crummy pauls.
    Ouch! Dude, I I'm right here. I can hear you.

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  46. #46
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    ... and if we just ...

    I love your sense of humor, Pawl.

  47. #47
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    I rode one

    Quote Originally Posted by mattKHS
    i agree that the belt should be pretty stable, strong and durable.

    So if this doesn't take off to multiple manufacturers, you could have a useless bike (unless it can convert back to chain) if Spot decides to bail on it.
    and it felt like a quieter chain
    BTW-The setup could be converted back to a chain drive easy enough
    Over The Edge in Fruita has demos also.
    I've been inside too long.

  48. #48
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    Who is manufacturing the belt drive components that I see on Orange bicycles all the time? Spot's not the only bike company making (outsourcing, more precisely) belt drive bicycles.

    Greg

  49. #49
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    I think I read that the same company who makes the belts for harley & Bulle makes this belt for spot.
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattKHS
    I think I read that the same company who makes the belts for Harley and Buell makes this belt for Spot.
    Last I heard, that was Gates.
    http://www.gates.com/

    For years, Jesel has been making belt drives for race car engines.
    http://www.jeselonline.com/v2/index.php?categoryid=22

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  51. #51
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    This is what I remember from when I was keeping up on the this new belt system: I came across one too many complaints of the belt slipping on standing climbs, so stopped following its development. Also, there were reports from desert riders who found it would start squeeking when really dry and had to spray some water on it. The efficiency reports on power transfer looked comaparable - and that was with with a newish chain in proper condition. A key advantage is that the system is way lighter than a normal drivetrain. The belt weighs hardly anything; meanwhile, my KMC SS chain weighs almost a pound (400 grams). Other tidbits: You can always go back to a traditional drive train. It lasts way longer and is way more reliable (supposedly). Belts made by Gates. If you don't like Spot or steel, you can buy the special kehole chainstay gizmo and give it to a custom designer to use (Spot was selling the steel module ~8 months ago with a promise that the alum and ti modules were soon to follow). Many thought the belt's best application would be for commuter bikes when teamed with an internal hub. And everyone raved about how smooth it felt and sounded. Anyhow, that's my recollection, although it might be kind of...spotty.

  52. #52
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    Saw this bike at lunch today and it was NICE. But to only have 1 option for gearing really stinks..

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by theFuzz
    Saw this bike at lunch today and it was NICE. But to only have 1 option for gearing really stinks..
    isnt that what an SS is?


    or are you saying there are no other cogs available for a different ratio?
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  54. #54
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    Cogs dont seem to be available. I did the WOR last april and would have died if I had to do all that climbing in a 32x19 gearing...

  55. #55
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    WOR?

    So Spot doesnt have anything else? Odd. I could see some optional sizes being a must for development.
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  56. #56
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    They may, I just cannot find any info on cogs so far..

  57. #57
    NardoSS
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    also...

    I spoke with a Spot rep a few months back and the belt drive system will be available for purchase separately...eventually. The catch is that you have to slice your frame and then have it re-welded after sliding in the belt. I have an EBB so I'd be able to go up or down one cog size. Who knows whey those will hit the market. I'll wait for 2nd generation.

    If motorcycle belts last thousands of miles I can't imagine my scrawny legs stretching or breaking this one. Also, let's say the belt does have to be changed in 3 or 4 years I'll probably want a new frame by then anyway.

    It's my understanding that any welded location is just as reliable as a non-welded tube. Is that correct?

    Spotbikes.com is still down...a web site down for days or weeks doesn't exactly make me want to invest in their product. That's just me though.

  58. #58
    Not a Barry supporter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by theFuzz
    I did the WOR last april and would have died if I had to do all that climbing in a 32x19 gearing...
    Yea, but you're weak so that doesn't count.

    Besides, 32x19 is the perfect gearing for AZ. I'm really interested in it.
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder
    EPA = crooks!

  59. #59
    NardoSS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB
    Yea, but you're weak so that doesn't count.
    My kung fu is also not very strong.

    32x19 for a 29er is just about perfect for the Phoenix area, but I'd like to have options just in case.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB
    32x19 is the perfect gearing for AZ.
    A 32 x 19 gear is 1.68:1, which is very close to a 42 x 25.

    The terrain I ride on here in Arizona includes long level surfaces, steep climbs, and steep descents. Factor in headwinds and tailwinds, and you may understand that any one gear ratio is only ideal part of the time. The rest of the time it's just not the right gear.

    Back in 1980, I rode my fixed-gear track bike with silk sew-ups and a Campagnolo Super Record front brake on the street a few times (until I smacked a pedal in a fast turn and almost went down in traffic). The gear my coach recommended for training rides was a 42 x 18 (2.33:1), but he told us to avoid steep climbs so we wouldn't damage our knees by pushing too big a gear.

    My preference is to minimize life's compromises, not add more of them.

    Dave
    http://www.roadsters.com/

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by NardoSS
    I spoke with a Spot rep a few months back and the belt drive system will be available for purchase separately...eventually. The catch is that you have to slice your frame and then have it re-welded after sliding in the belt.


    Spotbikes.com is still down...a web site down for days or weeks doesn't exactly make me want to invest in their product. That's just me though.
    No, no, no, no......You don't cut and weld your bike. As stated earlier on this thread, the system requires a specific Spot dropout. The dropout has a "key" which is removed to allow the belt to pass through, then the key is bolted back in place. So, you would have to cut and weld to have the dropout installed, but that's it.

    Some bikes can skip the key. If your bike has a bolted pivot or a bolted dropout, that will allow the belt to pass through.

    As for the web site, Spot recently purchased Maverick. As part of the deal, Maverick brought with them a web designer who is rebuilding Spots crummy web site.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roadsters
    A 32 x 19 gear is 1.68:1, which is very close to a 42 x 25.

    The terrain I ride on here in Arizona includes long level surfaces, steep climbs, and steep descents. Factor in headwinds and tailwinds, and you may understand that any one gear ratio is only ideal part of the time. The rest of the time it's just not the right gear.

    Back in 1980, I rode my fixed-gear track bike with silk sew-ups and a Campagnolo Super Record front brake on the street a few times (until I smacked a pedal in a fast turn and almost went down in traffic). The gear my coach recommended for training rides was a 42 x 18 (2.33:1), but he told us to avoid steep climbs so we wouldn't damage our knees by pushing too big a gear.

    My preference is to minimize life's compromises, not add more of them.

    Dave
    http://www.roadsters.com/

    Ahhh, ok. I agree that pushing too big a gear can destroy knees. I think I was close to having that issue a few months ago. Then hell came and brought heat with it and I hit the geared roadie. I've only ridden the MTB 3X's this summer and twice was in Seattle! I went 1x9 and I think I'll stick with that for the summer....but at SoMo last Sunday, I was kind of off my game and I it could have been the gears. Climbing was just too easy. (No, I'm not saying this to be a jerk and brag that I'm a great climber b/c I'm not....but I do like to suffer....I'm weird like that.) I just didn't suffer or get as good as a workout as I like. I like to be completely wasted after a ride, and SS @ 32x19 is a good gear for that. Anyway, that's probably the most worthless .02 ever!

    But Joe's still weak!
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder
    EPA = crooks!

  63. #63
    more beers, lees gears.
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    As a web developer, it does take a few weeks to design and build out a site.

    But no need to take down the old I didnt think. It still communicated some info.

    Interesting about the merger / purchase of maverick. I didnt know spot was growing that much.


    So will we see upside down spot forks on belt driven bikes?
    A burrito is a sleeping bag for ground beef.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattKHS
    As a web developer, it does take a few weeks to design and build out a site.
    And you also know it only takes a few minutes to hand-code an index.html file that has the company name, address, phone number, and E-mail address, along with a mention that the site is being redone and will be back up soon, and then upload it to the server.

    Dave
    http://www.roadsters.com/

  65. #65
    more beers, lees gears.
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    yep. but i dislike doing that. Then it looks tacky in 6 months.

    I say have a full working temp site up (even if its just a few basic pages), with some legit content.

    I also know that clients are a pain in the arse. I can build a full CMS driven site in a few days, but clients muck that up into weeks. I also used to work as an in house designer at a commercial real estate firm, and that was even slower.
    A burrito is a sleeping bag for ground beef.

  66. #66
    NardoSS
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roverbiker
    No, no, no, no......You don't cut and weld your bike.
    I have a Fisher Rig so it's not like I plan on cutting into a piece of art or an expensive frame that can't be replaced very easily. I don't have the money for a very nice bike so I just have to be really fast on a very cheap/fun one.

    Nevermind...you were right. The frame would require heat treating again and would not be worth the cost to do so and then to repaint.
    Last edited by NardoSS; 08-21-2008 at 04:37 PM.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by NardoSS
    I have a Fisher Rig so it's not like I plan on cutting into a piece of art or an expensive frame that can't be replaced very easily. I don't have the money for a very nice bike so I just have to be really fast on a very cheap/fun one.

    Nevermind...you were right. The frame would require heat treating again and would not be worth the cost to do so and then to repaint.
    To make the Spots more affordable, some of their models like the Longboard are made offshore and are a really good value. For a few hunny more than a Rig, you can get the belt system, hydro brakes, etc. I hope they do well with those bikes. I think they're pretty slick.

  68. #68
    Frame Building Moderator Moderator
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    A bit more info

    I'm in the process of playing with some of the belt drive stuff, if anyone is still reading this thread:
    http://waltworks.blogspot.com/2008/0...-thoughts.html

    I'm still trying to figure out how to get any kind of decent tire clearance and <18" chainstays. Honestly, I probably won't get anything done until the riding season is over. My free time is dedicated to pedaling right now, not being in the shop.

    -Walt

  69. #69
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    Thanks for the info Walt. I've been trying to research retrofitting my sir 9, but will stick with a chain. I live 10 minutes from Bilenky in Philadelphia. I was hoping it would be fairly easy. Please keep us informed of your progress. A few of us are still reading. E

  70. #70
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    Someone here in Prescott had a belt drive frame for a short time and there can indeed be tire clearance issues.

  71. #71
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    Their site is STILL down. Maybe they have their web team making frames instead?

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