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  1. #1
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Patching a ripped sidewall

    This weekend I tore a 1/4" gash in the sidwall of a brand new tire and of course the Stans sealant won't even remotely come close to sealing it up. Normally I'd just chuck the tire and put a new one on the bike...but this tire is brand friggin' new (as in the 1st ride!). The environmentalist in me just can't seem to waste the rubber.

    Is there any way to patch this tire so it holds up w/a Stans setup?

    Thx...Doug

  2. #2
    parenting for gnarness
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    This weekend I tore a 1/4" gash in the sidwall of a brand new tire and of course the Stans sealant won't even remotely come close to sealing it up. Normally I'd just chuck the tire and put a new one on the bike...but this tire is brand friggin' new (as in the 1st ride!). The environmentalist in me just can't seem to waste the rubber.

    Is there any way to patch this tire so it holds up w/a Stans setup?

    Thx...Doug
    there was a thread about some techniques on here not too long ago. I think Chongo has been working on a Nobel prize for new technology. Autopatches have worked, ymmv. Worst case, run a tube for a few months.
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  3. #3
    Tucson, AZ
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    That happened to me once and I did patch it.

    I used a regular cold vulcanizing tube patch, added some superglue for extra insurance, ran the stan's and never had a problem with the tear. I did decide to chuck the tire after all of it tho.

  4. #4
    My other ride is your mom
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    I just patched two sidewall tears by this method:

    1) Buy contact cement at a hardware store (looks like a jar of rubber cement)
    2) Use a patch made from old tube....cut to size
    3) Follow directions on the jar of contact cement (this is vulcanizing, so same thing as chad talks about)
    4) Apply to the inside of the tire.....dry......install......ride.....

    Post Edit: Since I use this method every once in a while...my jar of Contact Cement gets "gummy"....so I have to usually buy a new one..........So, to make a long story short....if anyone desires a fix.....hit me up PM style.....I'll let you use my Contact Cement and extra tubes for free......just feed me a beer when I do the work for you and you'll have saved 50 bucks on a new tire.




  5. #5
    Tucson, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    I just patched two sidewall tears by this method:

    1) Buy contact cement at a hardwear store (looks like a jar of rubber cement)
    2) Use a patch made from old tube....cut to size
    3) Follow directions on the jar of contact cement (this is vulcanizing, so same thing as chad talks about)
    4) Apply to the inside of the tire.....dry......install......ride.....
    5. Swear never to use that tire again.

  6. #6
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    OR............Just spend a few bucks more on Spec tires, free replacement.
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  7. #7
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    In addition to the patch, you may need to stitch the case together using some durable material such as wire or synthetic fiber thread that is not susceptible to UV. Very easy to do and you'd be amazed at how much more life you will get out of the tire.

  8. #8
    My other ride is your mom
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipolopolo
    OR............Just spend a few bucks more on Spec tires, free replacement.

    #6....realize, holy $h!t....these tires are heavy....and go back to step 1......




  9. #9
    Just a rider...
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    I've sewn up a couple using dental floss, then patch with regular patch. Worked fine until tread wore out. About 250 miles. Never worried about it after first ride. YMMV

  10. #10
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Thanks all for the suggestions.

    Here's one more detail I left out: after the tire blew chunks I stuck a tube in it. But when I pumped it up to 35psi, a bulge developed where the tear is (the tube is just beginning to poke through the sidewall)...so got to thinking: if I use a rubber patch to seal up the tire, wouldn't the patch bulge out too?

    Since tires have thread in them, I was wondering if it was possible to make a patch out of something else that is made of thread that doesn't "flex" like rubber: denim. I was thinking it might be interesting to take a small 1" square of denim and coat it with gorilla glue (or some other glue that doesn't dry hard...maybe caulk?)...let it dry...and then use that as a patch (maybe use rubber cement?). Would that work any better than a rubber patch?


    Thx...Doug

  11. #11
    My other ride is your mom
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    Quote Originally Posted by azepicriderandrunner
    5. Swear never to use that tire again.

    You're running on borrowed time my friend....while you're still there, can you pick some lottery numbers for me.....I could use the juice...I'll promise to buy you the best plywood snowboard for the next time you snowboard down a South American Volcano ash field.......




  12. #12
    My other ride is your mom
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    Thanks all for the suggestions.

    Here's one more detail I left out: after the tire blew chunks I stuck a tube in it. But when I pumped it up to 35psi, a bulge developed where the tear is (the tube is just beginning to poke through the sidewall)...so got to thinking: if I use a rubber patch to seal up the tire, wouldn't the patch bulge out too?

    Since tires have thread in them, I was wondering if it was possible to make a patch out of something else that is made of thread that doesn't "flex" like rubber: denim. I was thinking it might be interesting to take a small 1" square of denim and coat it with gorilla glue (or some other glue that doesn't dry hard...maybe caulk?)...let it dry...and then use that as a patch (maybe use rubber cement?). Would that work any better than a rubber patch?


    Thx...Doug

    No....too porous for a large surface area bulge. If you're experiencing a hernia...then you need to use a combo of what has already been offered here on this thread. First...you need to stitch it up like DesertCrawler talks about....then, you need to seal it up with the method I've outlined.

    Post Edit: I'm intrigued by your idea of using denim, and soaked in something like Gorilla Glue......I can see how that might work assuming you could get the glue to penetrate into the patch material....my concern is that Gorilla Glue or something like it would not penetrate into the thread structure....rather, it would coagulate on the surface and form a barrier which does not offer any additional value to the strength of the system as a whole. The reason contact cement works is because it chemically melts the two surfaces together. For small tears.....no problem. For big tears...you need to stitch......good luck!!!!!




  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    #6....realize, holy $h!t....these tires are heavy....and go back to step 1......
    Maad, try some research, some of the lightest tires in the industry. A 26 x 2.00 Fast Track Control is 515g, the S-works Fast Track SLK is a mere 495g. Problem is they are not reliable (the s-works tire) in our rocks. For races only.
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  14. #14
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    No....too porous for a large surface area bulge. If you're experiencing a hernia...then you need to use a combo of what has already been offered here on this thread. First...you need to stitch it up like DesertCrawler talks about....then, you need to seal it up with the method I've outlined.

    Post Edit: I'm intrigued by your idea of using denim, and soaked in something like Gorilla Glue......I can see how that might work assuming you could get the glue to penetrate into the patch material....my concern is that Gorilla Glue or something like it would not penetrate into the thread structure....rather, it would coagulate on the surface and form a barrier which does not offer any additional value to the strength of the system as a whole. The reason contact cement works is because it chemically melts the two surfaces together. For small tears.....no problem. For big tears...you need to stitch......good luck!!!!!
    What if you coated the denim in rubber cement? That's less viscous than Gorilla Glue and you could "squish" it into the fibers...and then ultimately stick it to the inside of the tire casing? Or buy a can of that liquid spray-on rubber, coat both sides of the denim with it, squish that into the fibers, let it dry, and then glue it onto the casing?

    I dunno...just thinking of a way to make a patch out of something with strong fibers instead of plain-ol' rubber. Then you wouldn't have to stitch the outside up, which is what seems to fail over time according to the other posters.

    Thx...Doug

  15. #15
    My other ride is your mom
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    Hey Doug....see post #4 for your "what-if's-yah-buts"




  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipolopolo
    Maad, try some research, some of the lightest tires in the industry. A 26 x 2.00 Fast Track Control is 515g, the S-works Fast Track SLK is a mere 495g. Problem is they are not reliable (the s-works tire) in our rocks. For races only.

    And your point is....????????




  17. #17
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    My point is, your saying they (spec tires) are heavy. Not......but ride whatever you like, I was just offering information. I would rather get free replacement than ride around on a booted tire. Maad, really it doesn't matter to me what tires you run.
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  18. #18
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    I've had good luck with emergency tire boots. I think they are made of kevlar or some similar weave and won't allow the "hernia" thing with the tube. I patched one of those soft Spec tires a few months back and it's still holding strong. Most LBS have them.

    http://www.parktool.com/product/emer...tire-boot-TB-2

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipolopolo
    My point is, your saying they (spec tires) are heavy. Not......but ride whatever you like, I was just offering information. I would rather get free replacement than ride around on a booted tire. Maad, really it doesn't matter to me what tires you run.

    I know you don't....it's not a big deal....to be plain...I'd rather roll the dice and go with a 2.3" tire that is 595gms (MutanoRaptor) and have to boot one every once in a while....than deal with Spec's tires which will never require booting in that size range, but only because they're a bit heavier.

    To each his/her own....I like to go fat and light...I'll deal with the consequences later (hence my sewing skills). As an aside....I don't run tires under 2.3".....what do you take me for, a dirt roadie?




  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bituman
    I've had good luck with emergency tire boots. I think they are made of kevlar or some similar weave and won't allow the "hernia" thing with the tube. I patched one of those soft Spec tires a few months back and it's still holding strong. Most LBS have them.

    http://www.parktool.com/product/emer...tire-boot-TB-2

    Bob

    A piece of plastic from a milk jug works too, possibly with stitching.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCrawler
    A piece of plastic from a milk jug works too, possibly with stitching.

    Milk jug is the emergency boot.....does not bond as well as rubber from a tube...but only after stitching.




  22. #22
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    I think you will have problems getting any type of glue to adhere to the sidewall, since it's been coated with Stans. That stuff penetrates the tires, and I think it would be difficult to remove it.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    Milk jug is the emergency boot.....does not bond as well as rubber from a tube...but only after stitching.
    Yes, makes sense. Denim (or canvas, or nothing?) and stitching is probably the way to go.

  24. #24
    Occidental Tourist
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    I recommend the sewing circle technique. I only had standard thread but I wonder of fishing line or something like that coupled with some contact cement would work to keep it tubeless.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Patching a ripped sidewall-cimg2772.jpg  

    This is just need to know information: Am i supposed to enjoy the irony or pity the sincerity?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyBike'sBroken
    I think you will have problems getting any type of glue to adhere to the sidewall, since it's been coated with Stans. That stuff penetrates the tires, and I think it would be difficult to remove it.
    I was able to patch a tire that had Stans in it by cleaning the area with contact/brake cleaner, then roughing up with the tool from the patch kit, and patching as directed.
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  26. #26
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    I tore about a 1/2in hole in a Specialized Eskar 2bliss last weekend. First ride out as well.
    Was able to patch it with a car patch kit cut up and ride it another 4 days, but in the end it hernia'ed and I got it swapped out for a UST Grid. Never thought about stitching it, makes sense, I will try that next time.
    I agree with chipo though, while I will probably buy another Nevegal for the rear next go round, the fact that Exhale just swapped it out for a new one is pretty cool about Specialized tires.

  27. #27
    Eroding into the trail
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    Quote Originally Posted by bskarasek
    I've sewn up a couple using dental floss, then patch with regular patch. Worked fine until tread wore out. About 250 miles. Never worried about it after first ride. YMMV
    Montana Dental Floss is the stuff of legends!

  28. #28
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    I swear by the Monkey Grip brand auto tire patches you can buy at Ace. The rubber cement combined with the adhesive on these patches make them work easily every time for me. See this thread: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=692120

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by chongoman
    I swear by the Monkey Grip brand auto tire patches you can buy at Ace. The rubber cement combined with the adhesive on these patches make them work easily every time for me. See this thread: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=692120
    Awesome. I'll swing my Ace Hardware this morning and get a kit.

    Your cotton trick has saved me 3x now with the small sidewall tears (well...I used toilet paper for one of them and it worked OK too). Now if your Ace boot kit works on this larger tear, I owe you BIG TIME. Maybe I'll come over and help you empty the shitter on your parent's Airstream.

    Thx...Doug

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    I know you don't....it's not a big deal....to be plain...I'd rather roll the dice and go with a 2.3" tire that is 595gms (MutanoRaptor) and have to boot one every once in a while....than deal with Spec's tires which will never require booting in that size range, but only because they're a bit heavier.

    To each his/her own....I like to go fat and light...I'll deal with the consequences later (hence my sewing skills). As an aside....I don't run tires under 2.3".....what do you take me for, a dirt roadie?
    FWIW - I've known plenty of people that have ripped open the sidewall on a Specialized tire. I'd say they are no more durable than any other brand...just that their warranty is better.

    Thx...Doug

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by chipolopolo
    Maad, try some research, some of the lightest tires in the industry. A 26 x 2.00 Fast Track Control is 515g, the S-works Fast Track SLK is a mere 495g. Problem is they are not reliable (the s-works tire) in our rocks. For races only.
    You seriously get warranty on sidewall tears? You are probably also the guy that returns a pair of pants to REI when you fall down and get a tiny hole in the knee.

    Maybe Specialized tires are so pricey because of the "warranty" being taken advantage of?

    I run Specialized tires almost exclusively, but I am too proud to return the tires because they leak air, and when I get a hole in my pants I patch them with the most funkiest patch I can find. I just patched a Captain on the outside and rode 4 days bikepacking. No problems.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by urbanseeds
    You seriously get warranty on sidewall tears? You are probably also the guy that returns a pair of pants to REI when you fall down and get a tiny hole in the knee.

    Maybe Specialized tires are so pricey because of the "warranty" being taken advantage of?

    I run Specialized tires almost exclusively, but I am too proud to return the tires because they leak air, and when I get a hole in my pants I patch them with the most funkiest patch I can find. I just patched a Captain on the outside and rode 4 days bikepacking. No problems.
    I'm not following your logic. If your car transmission fails under warranty do you take it a shop to repair and pay for it, or do you take it to the dealership for warranty?

    Specialized chooses to offer the warranty in an effort to gain business. I have on multiple occasions returned a tire I didn't like and got a new one. Specialized believes that they offer a product that can complete with the big tire manufacturers, but have had a tough time gaining the business. They have differentiated themselves from their competition by offering a warranty. I am not a Specialized guy, but I do like their tires.

    The ONLY reason I bought into Specialized tires, was the warranty. If for any reason I was not happy, I could take it back, no questions asked. I went through several tires until I found a combination that I liked. Specialized has now earned a new customer, as well as a LBS.

    I don't find Specialized tires to be any more expensive than anything else out there. Sure, I can find Kendas cheap online, but if I go into an LBS, you are looking at about $50 per tire, which is what I paid for my Specy tires. Findng deals on Maxxis tires is nearly impossible. DNA was running a special a few weeks ago, buy one get one free. So I stocked up at $25 per tire.

    I for one have had a difficult time finding tires that are durable enough for my riding and our terrain. I can feel confident that if I spend $50 on a Specy tire, and cut it the first day out, I'm covered. I have patched many tires, if the cut is big enough, a patch won't hold well.
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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I'm not following your logic. If your car transmission fails under warranty do you take it a shop to repair and pay for it, or do you take it to the dealership for warranty?

    Specialized chooses to offer the warranty in an effort to gain business. I have on multiple occasions returned a tire I didn't like and got a new one. Specialized believes that they offer a product that can complete with the big tire manufacturers, but have had a tough time gaining the business. They have differentiated themselves from their competition by offering a warranty. I am not a Specialized guy, but I do like their tires.

    The ONLY reason I bought into Specialized tires, was the warranty. If for any reason I was not happy, I could take it back, no questions asked. I went through several tires until I found a combination that I liked. Specialized has now earned a new customer, as well as a LBS.

    I don't find Specialized tires to be any more expensive than anything else out there. Sure, I can find Kendas cheap online, but if I go into an LBS, you are looking at about $50 per tire, which is what I paid for my Specy tires. Findng deals on Maxxis tires is nearly impossible. DNA was running a special a few weeks ago, buy one get one free. So I stocked up at $25 per tire.

    I for one have had a difficult time finding tires that are durable enough for my riding and our terrain. I can feel confident that if I spend $50 on a Specy tire, and cut it the first day out, I'm covered. I have patched many tires, if the cut is big enough, a patch won't hold well.
    We, as consumers, are so quick to just go out and buy or replace something that can be fixed. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I'm not following your logic. If your car transmission fails under warranty do you take it a shop to repair and pay for it, or do you take it to the dealership for warranty?

    Specialized chooses to offer the warranty in an effort to gain business. I have on multiple occasions returned a tire I didn't like and got a new one. Specialized believes that they offer a product that can complete with the big tire manufacturers, but have had a tough time gaining the business. They have differentiated themselves from their competition by offering a warranty. I am not a Specialized guy, but I do like their tires.

    The ONLY reason I bought into Specialized tires, was the warranty. If for any reason I was not happy, I could take it back, no questions asked. I went through several tires until I found a combination that I liked. Specialized has now earned a new customer, as well as a LBS.

    I don't find Specialized tires to be any more expensive than anything else out there. Sure, I can find Kendas cheap online, but if I go into an LBS, you are looking at about $50 per tire, which is what I paid for my Specy tires. Findng deals on Maxxis tires is nearly impossible. DNA was running a special a few weeks ago, buy one get one free. So I stocked up at $25 per tire.

    I for one have had a difficult time finding tires that are durable enough for my riding and our terrain. I can feel confident that if I spend $50 on a Specy tire, and cut it the first day out, I'm covered. I have patched many tires, if the cut is big enough, a patch won't hold well.
    +1
    Companies like Spesh tires, REI, Costco, Performance etc. aren't offering offering their return policy because they are suckers. They offer them because it makes them money in the long haul by creating happy customers.

    I find I can fix a tire faster than the time takes to go to the store, buy a new tire and install it. However, I have no guilt at all about returning something to any of the stores above after I use it and am not happy with it.

    I used to work at REI and take returns and there were always ridiculous examples of people returning ancient boots and tents, but overwhelmingly people are pretty honest an reasonable with policies like this.

    SMC sold me a Spesh tire for the first time a couple months ago. I was cautious about buying it and the sales guy reminded me about the return policy and I was sold. I liked it so much that I decided to patch it (see thread posted above) rather than return it. 50 bucks to SMC and no return by me because of the return policy. Good move sales guy

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by chongoman
    +1
    Companies like Spesh tires, REI, Costco, Performance etc. aren't offering offering their return policy because they are suckers. They offer them because it makes them money in the long haul by creating happy customers.

    I find I can fix a tire faster than the time takes to go to the store, buy a new tire and install it. However, I have no guilt at all about returning something to any of the stores above after I use it and am not happy with it.

    I used to work at REI and take returns and there were always ridiculous examples of people returning ancient boots and tents, but overwhelmingly people are pretty honest an reasonable with policies like this.

    SMC sold me a Spesh tire for the first time a couple months ago. I was cautious about buying it and the sales guy reminded me about the return policy and I was sold. I liked it so much that I decided to patch it (see thread posted above) rather than return it. 50 bucks to SMC and no return by me because of the return policy. Good move sales guy

    through traffic in the store is half the battle in retail. free ship-to-store pickup, returns, etc. all serve that purpose.
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  36. #36
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    well....I may have to start eating my words here....I just ripped another sidewall....that makes it 3 sidewall rips in the past week....




  37. #37
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    [QUOTE=chongoman]+1
    Companies like Spesh tires, REI, Costco, Performance etc. aren't offering offering their return policy because they are suckers. They offer them because it makes them money in the long haul by creating happy customers.

    [\QUOTE]

    Not only that, but the warranty and return costs are very accurately calculated and often factored into the final price of the product.

    I will also repair a tire if it is an option, but in some cases it is not. I am more interested in the satisfaction portion of the policy. Basically there is little risk in trying a new tire. I should also note, that the bike shop is not harmed in anyway by the return policy. All costs are incurred by Specialized. I would feel a bit guilty about trying new tires if I knew SMC had to eat the costs.
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  38. #38
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    [QUOTE=tiSS'er]
    Quote Originally Posted by chongoman
    +1
    Companies like Spesh tires, REI, Costco, Performance etc. aren't offering offering their return policy because they are suckers. They offer them because it makes them money in the long haul by creating happy customers.

    [\QUOTE]

    Not only that, but the warranty and return costs are very accurately calculated and often factored into the final price of the product.

    I will also repair a tire if it is an option, but in some cases it is not. I am more interested in the satisfaction portion of the policy. Basically there is little risk in trying a new tire. I should also note, that the bike shop is not harmed in anyway by the return policy. All costs are incurred by Specialized. I would feel a bit guilty about trying new tires if I knew SMC had to eat the costs.
    But why would you buy a tire you know very likely will not hold up well here, even if you can replace it free of charge. I'm not an expert on Specalized tires, but I've had one and got maybe 10 rides out of it before I split the sidewall. And from the tone of some of the posts here, I'm not the only one.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    But why would you buy a tire you know very likely will not hold up well here, even if you can replace it free of charge. I'm not an expert on Specalized tires, but I've had one and got maybe 10 rides out of it before I split the sidewall. And from the tone of some of the posts here, I'm not the only one.
    Specialized tires are more durable than any tires I have come by. I rarely have to repair my tires. I take tires back because I don't like it and want to try another. I don't even look at tires that are less than 850grams. For the longest time, I ran a 1200gram Maxxis Minion 2.35 DH dual ply rear tire.

    I recently tried a Kenda Nevegal 2.35 UST tire which weighs about 1000grams. The tire punctured 3 times in 2 months, all 3 punctures at PMP, which you know is tough on tires. The 900gram Specialized GRID tire is not only lighter, but in the 4 months I have ridden it, never had it puncture, cut, etc. I trust these tires.

    On my XC bike which I ride everywhere has a front tire that is 950grams, and the rear is 900grams. I hate repairing tires, putting in tubes, or just having a ride disrupted by flats.
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  40. #40
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    [QUOTE=skinny-tire]
    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    But why would you buy a tire you know very likely will not hold up well here, even if you can replace it free of charge. I'm not an expert on Specalized tires, but I've had one and got maybe 10 rides out of it before I split the sidewall. And from the tone of some of the posts here, I'm not the only one.
    Who said I was buying a tire I knew wouldn't hold up?
    The Spesh tires I know about are from the 2Bliss series and they are known to hold up well in tough conditions. They also set up really well on Stans rims.
    Sure I got a snake bite with this particular tire, but the situation I put this tire in would have pinched a dual ply DH tire.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    Specialized tires are more durable than any tires I have come by. I rarely have to repair my tires. I take tires back because I don't like it and want to try another. I don't even look at tires that are less than 850grams. For the longest time, I ran a 1200gram Maxxis Minion 2.35 DH dual ply rear tire.

    I recently tried a Kenda Nevegal 2.35 UST tire which weighs about 1000grams. The tire punctured 3 times in 2 months, all 3 punctures at PMP, which you know is tough on tires. The 900gram Specialized GRID tire is not only lighter, but in the 4 months I have ridden it, never had it puncture, cut, etc. I trust these tires.

    On my XC bike which I ride everywhere has a front tire that is 950grams, and the rear is 900grams. I hate repairing tires, putting in tubes, or just having a ride disrupted by flats.
    Fair enough. I did get it because a buddy was really high on Specalized. Prior to that, all I've run in WTB (on the HT) and Maxxis (on the AM). I have a Hutchinson on the HT now, and like it. But I'm a creature of habit, so I took the split sidewall as OCD karma.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  42. #42
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    [QUOTE=chongoman]
    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire

    Who said I was buying a tire I knew wouldn't hold up?
    The Spesh tires I know about are from the 2Bliss series and they are known to hold up well in tough conditions. They also set up really well on Stans rims.
    Sure I got a snake bite with this particular tire, but the situation I put this tire in would have pinched a dual ply DH tire.
    I misinterpreted what TiSS wrote, and assumed he returned the tires because they were not holding up. Apparently he returned them because he didnít' feel it was the right fit, and Specialized has a good return policy. I've heard others complain they rip too easy, and like I said, I've only had one Speclized (2Bliss), and tore it very quickly. Maybe just luck of the draw.

    But I'll stick with WTB and Maxxis, weight be damned.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  43. #43
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    [QUOTE=skinny-tire]
    Quote Originally Posted by chongoman
    I misinterpreted what TiSS wrote, and assumed he returned the tires because they were not holding up. Apparently he returned them because he didnít' feel it was the right fit, and Specialized has a good return policy. I've heard others complain they rip too easy, and like I said, I've only had one Speclized (2Bliss), and tore it very quickly. Maybe just luck of the draw.

    But I'll stick with WTB and Maxxis, weight be damned.

    There is no question that the S-Works line of tires tear very easily, they are however listed as race only. Tires that weight 500 grams are just silly where we ride. I find more people simply try to find a light tire, rather the right tire.

    The one thing that Specialized is getting very good at is offering variety within a tire line. Most of their tire models have a S-Works series for racers, a Control series for AM which are a bit tougher, 2Bliss for the XC/AM crowd which is a standard tire with a 2Bliss bead, Aramdillo for superior protection but with a weight penalty, and GRID which is a true UST. They recently have been offering a SX model in a few DH tires which are about 950grams and are a 1.5 ply tire. The SX models are genious since you get very close to DH level protection with a "reasonable" weight.

    I am running a Butcher SX 2.3 on the front of my bike and finally dialed it in at 22psi. These tires are very durable. I have found with Specy tires more than others, they are very pressure sensative. Another point of interest, you will notice many of the Specy tires are Maxxis copies. A few years back, Specy hired the main designer from Maxxis. The Butcher that i am running now is a Minion DHF clone.
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  44. #44
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    [QUOTE=tiSS'er]
    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire


    There is no question that the S-Works line of tires tear very easily, they are however listed as race only. Tires that weight 500 grams are just silly where we ride. I find more people simply try to find a light tire, rather the right tire.

    The one thing that Specialized is getting very good at is offering variety within a tire line. Most of their tire models have a S-Works series for racers, a Control series for AM which are a bit tougher, 2Bliss for the XC/AM crowd which is a standard tire with a 2Bliss bead, Aramdillo for superior protection but with a weight penalty, and GRID which is a true UST. They recently have been offering a SX model in a few DH tires which are about 950grams and are a 1.5 ply tire. The SX models are genious since you get very close to DH level protection with a "reasonable" weight.

    I am running a Butcher SX 2.3 on the front of my bike and finally dialed it in at 22psi. These tires are very durable. I have found with Specy tires more than others, they are very pressure sensative. Another point of interest, you will notice many of the Specy tires are Maxxis copies. A few years back, Specy hired the main designer from Maxxis. The Butcher that i am running now is a Minion DHF clone.
    TiSSer,

    Man....you wrote what I was thinkin, well said. They as a manufacturer have given the market what it's asked for. The R&D they put into every aspect of their line, road, MTB, tires whatever is pretty impressive. I do not take advantage of their ultra generous warrantee. BUT they will over achieve at every turn in service, specially to their S-Works demographic. I'm outright embarrassed at times, stealing a "brain" off a bike on the floor or replacing a spec. 143 toupe saddle because THEY didn't like the creaking. (twice)

    Total brand & LBS loyalty.
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  45. #45
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    OK.....so say I want to go down to Spec and pick up a tire.....shock....horror....what's a good, fast rolling tread with some side knobs that won't slide out on me in our desert, loose conditions????




  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    OK.....so say I want to go down to Spec and pick up a tire.....shock....horror....what's a good, fast rolling tread with some side knobs that won't slide out on me in our desert, loose conditions????
    I'm pretty happy with the 2.3 Clutch Control TLR front and 2.2 Purgatory UST rear on my 26'er ride. Ran the 2.4 Purgatory TRL and 2.2 Captain GRID on my 29'er for over a year with good results. All tubeless on Flows riding mostly in the PMP. I've been watching this thread. Spec seem larger than Maxxis in my opinion. So weights could be adjusted to a 2.5 Maxxis when comparing to a 2.3 Spec.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

  47. #47
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    Dang Maad,

    The Dark side?????
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    OK.....so say I want to go down to Spec and pick up a tire.....shock....horror....what's a good, fast rolling tread with some side knobs that won't slide out on me in our desert, loose conditions????
    Depends on what you are looking for in a size and tread. I would say the first step would be to start with The Captain. Seems to be a very popular tire here. One thing I find about Specy tires, is that their side knobs are excellent. Be sure to play with pressures before giving up on the tire.

    Will you be running tubed or tubeless?

    Check out their website, their weights have been very accurate, and their tires tend to run big. A 2.2 is more like a 2.25 or 2.3 and they all seem to have great volume. For a more durable tire on the rear, go with a GRID, Armadillo, or Control tire. The GRIDs are rediculoulsy durable, at a slight weight penalty.

    The great thing about Specialized, if you choose a tire, and you are not satisfied, take it back and try another. Yoiu must keeo the packaging the tire comes in and your receipt.
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle64
    I'm pretty happy with the 2.3 Clutch Control TLR front and 2.2 Purgatory UST rear on my 26'er ride. Ran the 2.4 Purgatory TRL and 2.2 Captain GRID on my 29'er for over a year with good results. All tubeless on Flows riding mostly in the PMP. I've been watching this thread. Spec seem larger than Maxxis in my opinion. So weights could be adjusted to a 2.5 Maxxis when comparing to a 2.3 Spec.
    I LOVE the Clutch Control on the front, but I would classify this as more of an AM tire. Not a great roller, but great at braking, and cornering.

    The Purgatory I thought was OK, but it rolled poorly IMO. I ran the 2.4 though, which is HUGE.

    I am now on the Butcher (Specy was sold out of the Clutch for a while) and am very impressed. Running an Eskar GRID 2.3 out back and really like it as well. I find it isn't perfect, but overal a very good tire, especially when leaned agressively.
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  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    Depends on what you are looking for in a size and tread. I would say the first step would be to start with The Captain. Seems to be a very popular tire here. One thing I find about Specy tires, is that their side knobs are excellent. Be sure to play with pressures before giving up on the tire.

    Will you be running tubed or tubeless?

    Check out their website, their weights have been very accurate, and their tires tend to run big. A 2.2 is more like a 2.25 or 2.3 and they all seem to have great volume. For a more durable tire on the rear, go with a GRID, Armadillo, or Control tire. The GRIDs are rediculoulsy durable, at a slight weight penalty.

    The great thing about Specialized, if you choose a tire, and you are not satisfied, take it back and try another. Yoiu must keeo the packaging the tire comes in and your receipt.
    tiSSer,
    Another highly accurate post, I prefer the fast trak LK series, they roll awesome and tend to hold pretty tight, as you said the sidewall knobs seem to be reliable, I run higher pressures that most 36-38 depending on current conditions but they seem to not drift to bad. I run them on both 26 & 29er

    For a race tire the SLK (super low knob) S-works gets the nod.
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I LOVE the Clutch Control on the front, but I would classify this as more of an AM tire. Not a great roller, but great at braking, and cornering.

    The Purgatory I thought was OK, but it rolled poorly IMO. I ran the 2.4 though, which is HUGE.

    I am now on the Butcher (Specy was sold out of the Clutch for a while) and am very impressed. Running an Eskar GRID 2.3 out back and really like it as well. I find it isn't perfect, but overal a very good tire, especially when leaned agressively.
    Would go Captain Control 2.2 (front) on the 29'er next time.

    Playing with pressures on the 26'er.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

  52. #52
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    OK that was a disaster!

    So as suggested...I went out and bought the tire patch kit from Ace Hardware. I then proceded to rough up the area inside the tire and coat it well with rubber cement...let it dry...and stuck the patch on. So far so good. Since the casing had some thread showing on the outside, I also put a little Superglue on the threads just to keep them from fraying.

    FWIW - the cut was a little longer than 1/4"...maybe 3/8" or 1/2".

    Anyway, once the tire patch dried for about an hour, I mounted the tire on the rim, put in some Stans goo, and inflated the tire to 40psi to get it to seat on the rim. So far so good...the patch looks like it is not leaking...

    ...until...

    ...the patch started to form a bubble.

    ...then the bubble got bigger...and bigger...and bigger...and eventually popped and spewed Stans all over the place like a giant zit!

    Great.

    So now I have a truly dead tire with a garage full of Stans goo.

    Now it's time for a new tire. Drat.

    Thanks anyway for the suggestions.

    Thx...Doug

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    I'm only sport'n 80 mm travel w/ my 'ol reba air up front on my 29 - to compensate lack of plush I switched to the purgatory 2.4 up front and the 2 bliss control for the back feels like a cadillac compared to the kenda's

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    So as suggested...I went out and bought the tire patch kit from Ace Hardware. I then proceded to rough up the area inside the tire and coat it well with rubber cement...let it dry...and stuck the patch on. So far so good. Since the casing had some thread showing on the outside, I also put a little Superglue on the threads just to keep them from fraying.

    FWIW - the cut was a little longer than 1/4"...maybe 3/8" or 1/2".

    Anyway, once the tire patch dried for about an hour, I mounted the tire on the rim, put in some Stans goo, and inflated the tire to 40psi to get it to seat on the rim. So far so good...the patch looks like it is not leaking...

    ...until...

    ...the patch started to form a bubble.

    ...then the bubble got bigger...and bigger...and bigger...and eventually popped and spewed Stans all over the place like a giant zit!

    Great.

    So now I have a truly dead tire with a garage full of Stans goo.

    Now it's time for a new tire. Drat.

    Thanks anyway for the suggestions.

    Thx...Doug
    HaHa. Stan's zit.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    So as suggested...I went out and bought the tire patch kit from Ace Hardware. I then proceded to rough up the area inside the tire and coat it well with rubber cement...let it dry...and stuck the patch on. So far so good. Since the casing had some thread showing on the outside, I also put a little Superglue on the threads just to keep them from fraying.

    FWIW - the cut was a little longer than 1/4"...maybe 3/8" or 1/2".

    Anyway, once the tire patch dried for about an hour, I mounted the tire on the rim, put in some Stans goo, and inflated the tire to 40psi to get it to seat on the rim. So far so good...the patch looks like it is not leaking...

    ...until...

    ...the patch started to form a bubble.

    ...then the bubble got bigger...and bigger...and bigger...and eventually popped and spewed Stans all over the place like a giant zit!

    Great.

    So now I have a truly dead tire with a garage full of Stans goo.

    Now it's time for a new tire. Drat.

    Thanks anyway for the suggestions.

    Thx...Doug

    {facepalm}




  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    So as suggested...I went out and bought the tire patch kit from Ace Hardware. I then proceded to rough up the area inside the tire and coat it well with rubber cement...let it dry...and stuck the patch on. So far so good. Since the casing had some thread showing on the outside, I also put a little Superglue on the threads just to keep them from fraying.

    FWIW - the cut was a little longer than 1/4"...maybe 3/8" or 1/2".

    Anyway, once the tire patch dried for about an hour, I mounted the tire on the rim, put in some Stans goo, and inflated the tire to 40psi to get it to seat on the rim. So far so good...the patch looks like it is not leaking...

    ...until...

    ...the patch started to form a bubble.

    ...then the bubble got bigger...and bigger...and bigger...and eventually popped and spewed Stans all over the place like a giant zit!

    Great.

    So now I have a truly dead tire with a garage full of Stans goo.

    Now it's time for a new tire. Drat.

    Thanks anyway for the suggestions.

    Thx...Doug

    What tire are you running that requires 40psi? Is it a Kenda?
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  57. #57
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    I guess I don't get the big deal of patching the interior. I've had defective tires before that I patched the interior and it held great and I got full life out of it. Use a radial car tire patch kit, it's made to patch the interior of tires. Cheap and effective.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    What tire are you running that requires 40psi? Is it a Kenda?
    I only inflate tires to 40psi to get the bead to pop on the rim (Stans Flow). Once the bead sets I then back the pressure down to 27psi or so.

    Unfortunately the tire patch didn't survive the 40psi shot.

    Thx...Doug

  59. #59
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    ok...i had a almost identical situation as op happen last weekend. brand new tire at bootleg, 1 run....ripped sidewall. i already had the idea to fix, and after reading this thread my ideas where reinforced. first off....maxxis minion dhr 2.5, bond prep (scuff & clean w/ solvent) inside & patch (old tube cut to size), thick coat of contact cement to both tire & patch...let dry. heat both patch & tire w/ heat gun, apply patch to desired location. roll out any air pockets. continued to mount tire for stans application. alls well after 6 runs on mingus...
    j

  60. #60
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    I'm really digging captain controls, 2.2 front, 2.0 rear. Fast, light, grippy as heck and seems to be fairly durable.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    So as suggested...I went out and bought the tire patch kit from Ace Hardware. I then proceded to rough up the area inside the tire and coat it well with rubber cement...let it dry...and stuck the patch on. So far so good. Since the casing had some thread showing on the outside, I also put a little Superglue on the threads just to keep them from fraying.

    FWIW - the cut was a little longer than 1/4"...maybe 3/8" or 1/2".

    Anyway, once the tire patch dried for about an hour, I mounted the tire on the rim, put in some Stans goo, and inflated the tire to 40psi to get it to seat on the rim. So far so good...the patch looks like it is not leaking...

    ...until...

    ...the patch started to form a bubble.

    ...then the bubble got bigger...and bigger...and bigger...and eventually popped and spewed Stans all over the place like a giant zit!

    Great.

    So now I have a truly dead tire with a garage full of Stans goo.

    Now it's time for a new tire. Drat.

    Thanks anyway for the suggestions.

    Thx...Doug
    I have dealt with this on several occasions myself....figured half hour of work to repair a $40-50 tire was worth the effort! I have found that sewing the bigger tears before patching really helps the bulging that you experienced. Also glueing the threading on the outside helps as well.

    I bought the patch kit from the auto supply store that Durtgurl mentioned sometime ago, and those patches are really thick and dont bulge out too bad. But might be the same as the ones you got from Ace. (big props to ace for their loose bolt department!!) I also found better results with letting glue sit overnight before airing them up.

    Been wondering if you have a big hand stapler, if you could staple the the tear instead of sewing it. This might hold up better/worse? Not sure but got to be a way for us to start saving some of our tires.

    I have had a Spec Fast Trak Grid 2bliss on the rear for the last three months and had zero issues with it. I have killed tons of the 2bliss controls but the Grid really has held up well and I have been riding 4 days a week and really beat it around!! Just wish the grip would last a bit longer.

  62. #62
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    for reference
    I work with inflatable Fabrics and composites that go on Commercial airliners. The escape slides and liferafts you use incase of emergencies. The way our company repairs a hole permanently in an inflatable structure is to place a patch inside and outside. It is needed to place a patch with the same integrity of the base material on the inside of the hole at minimum. Area prep is key as well as following the adhesives directions to a T. In the case of a rip, one should try to round the 2 edges of the rip so that the rip has less of a chance to continue in the same direction. I understand this may not be possible but it is ideal. With the fabrics we use on slides, a 1/8" hole needs a 2" patch inside and 1"outside and a 1/4" hole will need a 4" round patch on inside and 1.5" on outside. A 1/4" rip needs a patch extending 2" past the rip on each side and a about a 2x1" patch on outside. Keep in mind this is a fabric with urethane coating on one side. The sewing technique is not used in my industry. I understand that I'm talking about in some cases a significantly larger patch than you guys may be use to seeing or using. Just some food for thought here.

    i've done some ghetto patching of holes myself. One time on a large puncture it included a pc of my shirt which I slimed with a little Powerbar goo on the inside and wrapped electrical tape around the outside. I preped the area as best I could and stretched the tape out upon application and tripple wrapped around the rim and tire. I got 4 thorns in one ride so I had to result to this technique.



    So about returning Specialized tires??

    I am going to be running the 2.4 UST purgatory Grid front and rear on my El Guapo. If I don't like the tire, do I take it back to the LBS or send it to Specialized myself with a copy of the receipt and original packaging? I couldn't find anything on the Specialize site about warranty. Maybe someone can point me in the correct direction?

    I'm pretty sure I'm going to like the tires as I love the 2.4 Purg Control on my 29r but I'm getting into a more aggressive type of riding now so I might want something else.

    about the return, I'm also a bit concerned about it being all slimed up with Stans and or Slime and Specialize maybe having a problem with it. Anyone think they will see an issue with this?

    Thanks for the info
    back at it
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  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by berny2435

    So about returning Specialized tires??

    I am going to be running the 2.4 UST purgatory Grid front and rear on my El Guapo. If I don't like the tire, do I take it back to the LBS or send it to Specialized myself with a copy of the receipt and original packaging? I couldn't find anything on the Specialize site about warranty. Maybe someone can point me in the correct direction?

    I'm pretty sure I'm going to like the tires as I love the 2.4 Purg Control on my 29r but I'm getting into a more aggressive type of riding now so I might want something else.

    about the return, I'm also a bit concerned about it being all slimed up with Stans and or Slime and Specialize maybe having a problem with it. Anyone think they will see an issue with this?

    Thanks for the info
    You take the tire back to the LBS. The LBS will sedn the tire back to Specialized and be credited for it. You have 90 days to try the tire. When you return a tire, no excuse is needed. I usually talk to Scott at SMC about the tire and why I don't like it. It is good info for him. You need to return the tire with the plastic piece the tire is wrapped in, as well as the receipt.

    Walk in, find a new tire, walk out. That simple.

    As far as the Stans issue, I have not had any problems. I wash the tire inside and out, but there is usually some residue left, no worries. Specialized does not have issues with you running sealant.

    Just thinking about the return policy...I have returned 2 tires that I didn't care for, and I have bought a total of 11 tires. I am getting to be so happy with the Butcher as a front tire on my XC/AM bike, I may very well purchase some Butcher DH tires. On top of all that, here I am blabbing in the interwebs about their tires, and now there are a few of you who may try them out. Seems like the return policy is favorable for Specy....excellent marketing...
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    You take the tire back to the LBS. The LBS will sedn the tire back to Specialized and be credited for it. You have 90 days to try the tire. When you return a tire, no excuse is needed. I usually talk to Scott at SMC about the tire and why I don't like it. It is good info for him. You need to return the tire with the plastic piece the tire is wrapped in, as well as the receipt.

    clip..

    Thanks! I got mine ordered from Landis off of Southern in South Tempe. Would have went to SMC but they are a little further off the path from Work to Home. Plus I wanted to see that shop as I haven't been there before. Nice place but they don't carry many tires in the larger sizes. I noticed that Slippery Pig does though. I'm still tryin to pick my homebase. Each have been good to me so far.
    back at it
    2014 Trek Stache 7.

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I have returned 2 tires that I didn't care for, and I have bought a total of 11 tires. I am getting to be so happy with the Butcher as a front tire on my XC/AM bike, I may very well purchase some Butcher DH tires.
    I was thinking about a Butcher on the front and Clutch on the rear but damn they are expensive. I nabbed a smoking deal on a couple WTB Dissent DH and Prowler DH tires on Chainlove and I've only got the one ride on Trail 8 on them but they seemed perfectly adequate for the task. Not that I'm good enough to tell the difference

  66. #66
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    So screw Specialized and their stupid warranty, im not poor I will buy what works best. Cool if I rip a huge tear in my sidewall and they replace it, that was nice. But when i swap it for the Capitan Grid UST and it gets a small hole in the tread on my first use, I will buy Kenda Nevegal USTs at full price, even if they were 100 each, not to have to deal with this bull*****.
    I am losing faith in Stan's too. This was not a big hole at all, and it just all bubbled out, didn't seal, and wouldn't even seal around the patch. Is there a better sealent than Stans?

    Am I riding wrong? When I had tubes it was pinch flats. Tubeless it is holes and tears that don't seal.

    WEAK.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhxBenK
    So screw Specialized and their stupid warranty, im not poor I will buy what works best. Cool if I rip a huge tear in my sidewall and they replace it, that was nice. But when i swap it for the Capitan Grid UST and it gets a small hole in the tread on my first use, I will buy Kenda Nevegal USTs at full price, even if they were 100 each, not to have to deal with this bull*****.
    I am losing faith in Stan's too. This was not a big hole at all, and it just all bubbled out, didn't seal, and wouldn't even seal around the patch. Is there a better sealent than Stans?

    Am I riding wrong? When I had tubes it was pinch flats. Tubeless it is holes and tears that don't seal.

    WEAK.
    I rode Stan's on wimpy XC class tires on the various PMP stuff we ride, shuttled Gernoimo, and ran National/Mormon thrice. One puncture that did not seal itself, and that was due to not having replenished the sealant. My fault. Two One was at Geronimo where I tore the bead off the rim after hitting a rock. Likely too low air pressure. Again, I blamed myself.

    Stan's works in general.

    Can speak to your specific issues, but I know it can be frustrating.

    Patches and Stan's or any incompatible chemicals may not work well. The ammonia may be the culprit, dunno.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCrawler
    I rode Stan's on wimpy XC class tires on the various PMP stuff we ride, shuttled Gernoimo, and ran National/Mormon thrice. One puncture that did not seal itself, and that was due to not having replenished the sealant. My fault. Two One was at Geronimo where I tore the bead off the rim after hitting a rock. Likely too low air pressure. Again, I blamed myself.

    Stan's works in general.

    Can speak to your specific issues, but I know it can be frustrating.

    Patches and Stan's or any incompatible chemicals may not work well. The ammonia may be the culprit, dunno.
    The stan's in the front nev has hever burped, I am wondering if maybe there isn't enough solid stans crystals in there and that's why.
    I have had a puncture or flat on 80% of my rides, and I ride 3-5 days a week.

    Admittedly today's was at the end of my run, I did porcupine rim, zipper, back to 40th, then ran 1a loop and back down zipper.

    What tires you running?

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhxBenK
    The stan's in the front nev has hever burped, I am wondering if maybe there isn't enough solid stans crystals in there and that's why.
    I have had a puncture or flat on 80% of my rides, and I ride 3-5 days a week.

    Admittedly today's was at the end of my run, I did porcupine rim, zipper, back to 40th, then ran 1a loop and back down zipper.

    What tires you running?
    Stans & Flat Attack mix for me.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhxBenK
    The stan's in the front nev has hever burped, I am wondering if maybe there isn't enough solid stans crystals in there and that's why.
    I have had a puncture or flat on 80% of my rides, and I ride 3-5 days a week.

    Admittedly today's was at the end of my run, I did porcupine rim, zipper, back to 40th, then ran 1a loop and back down zipper.

    What tires you running?
    Not enough Stan's or perhaps a bad batch could account for the lack of performance.

    You likely already have done so, but maybe experimenting some more with tire pressures is in order.

    The tires that I ran with Stan's were WTB MotoRaptor Race 2.25 on non-UST rims using the split 20" tube approach for the rim interface.

    These tires are paper thin and very light. The sidewalls are so worn they are even more flimsy. A patched tear in the sidewall keeps me from running them tubeless now. Doing so just wouldn't be safe. Now I run tubes and take it somewhat easy in places where pinch flats are probable.

    I am sure there are better choices for recreational use and aggressive riding. I ran them at 22 psi and they hooked up on climbs and rolled like crazy, and survived numerous runs on Cheesegrater, the gnarly sections of 8, 220 chutes and drops, and everywhere else that poor bike has been. Still running them now at about 25 psi to ward off pinch flats a bit but still enjoy great traction in virtually all conditions.

    You might look at some of the Maxxis offerings for super tough AZ tires. A High Roller rear in the DH super tacky works awesome. I have a Minion up front but won't buy another one for reasons well documented by numerous people. Maybe an Ardent up front could work. Anyway, so far zero flats.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCrawler
    You might look at some of the Maxxis offerings for super tough AZ tires. A High Roller rear in the DH super tacky works awesome. I have a Minion up front but won't buy another one for reasons well documented by numerous people.
    Hmmm... haven't seen any of this documentation. Where's the thread(s)? I did a quick search but didn't really come up with much besides personal preference.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by big0mike
    Hmmm... haven't seen any of this documentation. Where's the thread(s)? I did a quick search but didn't really come up with much besides personal preference.

    Month's ago read pretty much every review I could find and bought them anyway. There were enough comments about the mid-transition traction issue that it stuck out when it started happening to me. Google would be your best bet. Even with this complaint, they are clearly an outstanding tire, For me, I will try a different front next time around.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesertCrawler
    Month's ago read pretty much every review I could find and bought them anyway. There were enough comments about the mid-transition traction issue that it stuck out when it started happening to me.
    I guess that's where me sucking so bad comes in handy since when I lose traction I assume it's my fault. And it usually is...

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