Results 1 to 30 of 30
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    48

    Need GPS Recomendations

    To all out there who use a GPS for riding I am looking for tips (calling AES folk, etc). I don't know what to look for. I don't need a fitness oriented one, I have a forerunner "watch" already.

    1. I want to use the one I buy to be able to load .gpx files, maps, routes, etc. for Mtn biking.
    2. Geocaching sounds like something really cool to do with the kids.
    3. It would be great to be able to use it in the car. Thereby, improving the return on investment when justifying it to my lovely wife.

    Please feel free to recommend specific models and anything you like, dislike, have learned, etc. I appreciate your help.

  2. #2
    Black and Sticky
    Reputation: Bituman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    700
    Here's a good place to start:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=548367
    "Some people follow their dreams, others hunt them down and beat them mercilessly into submission." - Neil Kendall

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: starkynuke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    17
    I use a Garmin eTrex Vista cx for biking/hiking/fishing/geocaching and just about everything else. The cx is hard to find these days, but the Hcx isn't. The 'H' just means it has a "high sensitivity" for better satellite tracking or something of the sort. The eTrex Vista cx's can be found for about $100 if you look around...

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: starkynuke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    17
    Forgot to mention likes/dislikes/lessons learned. Likes: track feature, geocaching is easy, color screen, button setups, water-proofing. Dislikes: customer service, doesn't like cities with tall buildings. Lessons: 1) Fight the urge to get integrated rechargeable battery. When I'm hiking and I've killed a battery, it's a lot easier to just pop in new AA's. Plus, I can use it every day camping and have no worries about battery life. 2) Bigger screen isn't always better. The bigger the screen usually the bigger the device. The bigger the device the less likely you are to carry it. Previous: Magellan explorist 300 and 500...hated them.

  5. #5
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,245
    60csx is what I have and I bought it specifically for the reasons you mentioned.
    -Upload tracks (removable storage)
    -Can use city maps in the car (has a larger screen than hcx versions)
    -turn by turn directions
    -color screen
    -geocache ready

    Likes:
    -Useful direct feature buttons keep me from having to navigate through menu screens too much like smaller units.
    -Great reception in the trees.....or even in my living room, lol.
    -Water proof, like most. I've taken it into the water at Box Canyon in Payson several times, no issues.
    -Can take a 2gb card, new ones maybe more.
    -Color screen
    -Electronic compass, very useful for geocaching. Keeps you from having to walk a few yards in one direction to get your bearing.

    Dislikes:
    -Kinda big for the bars. I just throw it in my pack or strap it in the front if I need to see it often.
    -Garmin maps are so so, and expensive. There are alternatives but his applies to any Garmin I suppose.

    My 60csx if a few years old now, I'm sure Garmins current offerings are a bit different but for what you want I'd look for a big color screen, lots of direct input buttons, removable storage and turn by turn directions as a starting point. All those things are probably more common than not nowadays, idk.

  6. #6
    Chilling out
    Reputation: bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,971
    +5 on the 60CSx, it's been a faithful companion for years now for me too. Many a trip on it, car - bike - and geocaching.

    Be advised, there's rumor that Garmin is updating the model line this year, specifically bringing out what amounts to new revisions of the 76 and 60 series. The GPSMAP 78 series is "out" - but who knows the availability - and the "62" series is rumored to be coming. The notable upgrades in them (seen from previews) is better support for paperless geocaching, more memory capacity, better compass (3-axis vs 2-axis), and Garmin-based support for what they call "Custom Maps" - e.g. raster image based maps.

    I'm going to be *very* interested in upgrading to the 62 whence it comes out.

  7. #7
    ...
    Reputation: dtownmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,349
    Hey Phil.

    I use the Vista HCX. Does everything you need. I got Nancy the Dakota recently. I actually like hers better.

    The best feature of the Dakota over the HCX is that you can load tracks with up to 10,000 points. With the HCx a track can only have 500 points max. When you reduce a big track to 500 points - it loses a lot of granularity. For this reason alone I'd go with the Dakota.

    Scott Morris (creator of Topofusion) has spent lots of time with both units. Check his comments here http://www.bikepacking.net/reviews/g...min-vista-hcx/ and here http://www.topofusion.com/diary/2009...ota-20-review/.

    --Jeff

  8. #8
    ...
    Reputation: dtownmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,349
    One other thing. Don't waste your money on the Garmin maps. You can get free topo maps here: http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/maps/view/1. Spend that money on a copy of Topofusion - way better that the standard Garmin software.

    --Jeff

  9. #9
    Losing Ground
    Reputation: Guipago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    213
    I had a 60CSx and it was a stellar performer and bombproof. I lost it though, and waited for a while to get a new unit. When I found a good deal on the Dakota20, I got that for the main advantage of being able to load and create custom maps. If you're computer savvy all you need is a KMZ file which can be created and exported from TopoFusion, Google Earth, and some others. One major downside of the touchscreen models is visibility when mounted to a fixed location. It can be very hard to impossible to see depending on sun direction. If it's true about a "62" version coming out to support custom maps, it might be worth it to wait (depending on availability and price) just for the visibility factor.
    Dtown's right about the free AZ Topos too.

  10. #10
    sprocket
    Reputation: yetisurly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,182
    Quote Originally Posted by philaz
    To all out there who use a GPS for riding I am looking for tips (calling AES folk, etc). I don't know what to look for. I don't need a fitness oriented one, I have a forerunner "watch" already.

    1. I want to use the one I buy to be able to load .gpx files, maps, routes, etc. for Mtn biking.
    2. Geocaching sounds like something really cool to do with the kids.
    3. It would be great to be able to use it in the car. Thereby, improving the return on investment when justifying it to my lovely wife.

    Please feel free to recommend specific models and anything you like, dislike, have learned, etc. I appreciate your help.
    I run a Garmin Dakota. Nice bike mount. Small with pretty big display, touch screen, accurate, fast. 2 AA batteries, no removable storage, but 800MB built in. Nice unit.

  11. #11
    Tucson, AZ
    Reputation: azepicriderandrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,974
    All great advice; I use an Etrex Vista for 3 years and could see myself upgrading to the Dakota when/if my Etrex dies.

  12. #12
    sprocket
    Reputation: yetisurly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,182
    Quote Originally Posted by dtownmtb
    One other thing. Don't waste your money on the Garmin maps. You can get free topo maps here: http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/maps/view/1. Spend that money on a copy of Topofusion - way better that the standard Garmin software.

    --Jeff
    the AZ State map from gpsfiledepot is pretty spiffy.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tonebone2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by dtownmtb
    One other thing. Don't waste your money on the Garmin maps. You can get free topo maps here: http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/maps/view/1. Spend that money on a copy of Topofusion - way better that the standard Garmin software.

    --Jeff
    +1

    Also, my Dakota seems to have come with preloaded topo and trails of any NF land, and I didn't buy any Garmin maps. I think it's NF area, I'm not sure. I noticed in Sedona, Payson area, and by Bumble Bee so far that all had preloaded topo and actually in Sedona it had most of the trails.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kcaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    182
    If you have an iphone 3gs, this app has been worth every bit of its $2.99 price. Try the lite version first, fo free!

    http://gps.motionx.com/iphone/overview/

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: starkynuke's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by dtownmtb
    One other thing. Don't waste your money on the Garmin maps. You can get free topo maps here: http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/maps/view/1. Spend that money on a copy of Topofusion - way better that the standard Garmin software.

    --Jeff



    Jeff, outstanding recommendation! I had found that website a year or two ago and it's just getting better. The maps you find on there are absolutely great.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tonebone2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by kcaz
    If you have an iphone 3gs, this app has been worth every bit of its $2.99 price. Try the lite version first, fo free!

    http://gps.motionx.com/iphone/overview/

    iPhone for GPS tracking is a cheap way to get into GPS for casual use. As a former user of it though, I strongly recommend not using it, or at least relying on it. It's OK for urban use maybe around South Mouth or PMP for example, even though battery life while tracking is going to be a max of about 7 hrs. When you are out in more remote areas and don't get cell signal, the inaccuracy of it is downright scary. Seriously do not plan on using iPhone to get you where you are going if you are somewhere without cell signal. I finally gave up on it after spending a few hours semi lost on the BCT because it's navigation was so far off. It was showing me at least half a mile away from where I was.

  17. #17
    MTBikeAZ.com
    Reputation: TheBarqsMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    117
    My vote is for the 60CSx. Faithful and bombproof (has hit the ground many times on downhills) I wear it on my chest when following tracks on new trails, and stash it in the CamelBak when riding familiar desert. Always gets good reception.

    REI has it on sale for $199. The lowest price I have ever see, even online. Must be chucking inventory to get ready for the new model.

    I've been using the GPS file Depot maps for years too. Awesome and free.
    Mike
    MTBikeAZ.com
    --
    How fast can you climb?
    http://helipadtt.blogspot.com

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    48
    Thanks everybody. I think I have narrowed it to the 60CSX or Dakota 20. It looks like they both allow the same number of tracking points but, the Dakota is compatible with Garmin's "custom maps" and has 850MB internal storage. I found a Dakota 20 for $255 from "GPS onsale" (plus 12-15 in shipping). Do you think it is worth the money over walking into REI and getting a 60csx for $200?

    Regarding, the custom maps thing, are there other ways than Garmin's software to do the same thing? I assume their are.

  19. #19
    Chilling out
    Reputation: bear's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    5,971
    There does exist ways of making custom maps other than the Garmin stuff, but it's not as simple / seamless IIRC. Disclaimer: I have *not* spent the time to really setup and do it myself so it may be easier than I think.

  20. #20
    Losing Ground
    Reputation: Guipago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    213
    Quote Originally Posted by philaz
    Thanks everybody. I think I have narrowed it to the 60CSX or Dakota 20. It looks like they both allow the same number of tracking points but, the Dakota is compatible with Garmin's "custom maps" and has 850MB internal storage. I found a Dakota 20 for $255 from "GPS onsale" (plus 12-15 in shipping). Do you think it is worth the money over walking into REI and getting a 60csx for $200?

    Regarding, the custom maps thing, are there other ways than Garmin's software to do the same thing? I assume their are.
    I have access to a lot of program applications and data and can usually figure out software, but I've tried to follow tutorials and create custom maps for 60CSx, but never had success. With something like TopoFusion it's a fairly simple process to load them on the Dakota20.

    Those are both great prices. To me the main deciding factors would be custom maps vs. visibility.

  21. #21
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,245
    Quote Originally Posted by Guipago
    Those are both great prices. To me the main deciding factors would be custom maps vs. visibility.

    I would really like to be able to load custom maps to my 60csx, that would be cool.

    I haven't looked at gps's in a while and the Dakota looks interesting. Screen size looks to be the same as the 60csx but it would work much better on the bars of a bike. Poor visability when in use would be my main concern, only b/c of what I read earlier. Also, it seems as if everything needs to be accessed through menus and sub-menus. I don't like that idea, however with the touch screen technololgy I'm guessing it really isn't a problem as you should be able to select from a menu list without having to actually scroll through it like in the past.

    I'd go put my hands on both of them and play around with the both of them. That's what I did when I was shopping. I went to buy a Vista hcx but once I played with the 60csx I was sold on that one.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  22. #22
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
    Reputation: longhairmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,588
    if they've dropped the 60csx price to $200 i'd definitely grab it

    i also bought the comprehensive US road database microSD card for my 60csx,, it was fun turning it on in a jet at 530mph and seeing how quickly you're whipping by everything.
    there are just SO many menus on that thing i think i've barely scratched the surface of them.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tonebone2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by philaz
    Thanks everybody. I think I have narrowed it to the 60CSX or Dakota 20. It looks like they both allow the same number of tracking points but, the Dakota is compatible with Garmin's "custom maps" and has 850MB internal storage. I found a Dakota 20 for $255 from "GPS onsale" (plus 12-15 in shipping). Do you think it is worth the money over walking into REI and getting a 60csx for $200?

    Regarding, the custom maps thing, are there other ways than Garmin's software to do the same thing? I assume their are.
    I don't remember for sure what the price on those at REI right now, but I know most of those units have a $50 rebate on them right now.

    To answer the second question- Topofusion. Like other people having been saying, once you get into GPS, TF is your best friend. Making custom maps and send them to your unit is super easy in TF too.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    48
    REI had a deal on the Dakota 20 so I got one of those. Any suggestions on how big an Micro SD card I should get? It came with Garmins 100k topo US map software included. Can I have that and Topofusion loaded at the same time or does that cause problems? That is probably a dumb question but, I am clueless.

  25. #25
    Tucson, AZ
    Reputation: azepicriderandrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,974
    Quote Originally Posted by philaz
    REI had a deal on the Dakota 20 so I got one of those. Any suggestions on how big an Micro SD card I should get? It came with Garmins 100k topo US map software included. Can I have that and Topofusion loaded at the same time or does that cause problems? That is probably a dumb question but, I am clueless.
    If you are referring to the basemaps on the GPS, yeah, those are fine to put on. I have most of the southwest on mine. No reason to really get a huge Micro SD card as the GPS actually holds all the date from the GPX files.

  26. #26
    jimfab
    Guest

    200 bucks

    just an FYI, Cabelas has a package deal on the 60csx with case and topo and all that for 215 this weekend, and sports authority has the dakota for 200. Both are in the PHX sunday adds. I got the 60csx a while back and love it, it has way more features than i know how to use, but what i like most about it is the bats last a long time compared to my old blue legend and it is easy to use the simple features, fast start up, even tracks in my house, very easy to see on the go. The bike mounts are not to be found in stores, i had to get one online.

    Also... Cabelas will hold one over the phone if you cll and ask for optics/ hand held gps department. I got mine for 200 about 4 months ago without the topo or case, best deal i have ever seen.

    Rock on- Jim

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,079
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/DeLorme-Ea...1-203/10993618

    Just ordered this best deal i could find on a couple hours of research
    XC, Road, XXC, Endurance, Mtn, All-Mtn, Cross, Gravel, just go have fun on 2 wheels!

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by tonebone2000
    Seriously do not plan on using iPhone to get you where you are going if you are somewhere without cell signal. I finally gave up on it after spending a few hours semi lost on the BCT because it's navigation was so far off. It was showing me at least half a mile away from where I was.
    I was just up on the back side of Mount Lemmon and used my iphone 3G to do tracking. I had no cell service and did not have this problem. The tracking was surprisingly accurate.

  29. #29
    Need more cowbell
    Reputation: WhiskersOfDeath's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    938
    I believe the iphone 3g has a true GPS vs. the older iphone that relied on cell service for triangulation. I notice my 3g picks up GPS even when "no service" is displayed.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tonebone2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    178
    Quote Originally Posted by WhiskersOfDeath
    I believe the iphone 3g has a true GPS vs. the older iphone that relied on cell service for triangulation. I notice my 3g picks up GPS even when "no service" is displayed.
    It's interesting to hear you guys have had better experiences. It was a 3GS. It would pick up GPS without cell signal, but like I said sometimes it was just really inaccurate. Could have been the terrain, although I've used a real GPS and not had problems in that area. Either way, it gave me a good excuse to go buy a GPS.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.