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  1. #1
    oh Lucky me
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    Monsoon Riding

    Noob Question...

    As an AZ Native, i am VERY aware of how brutal our Monsoon's can be. This is going to be my first season riding with the Monsoon's. I am just trying to get a concensus on what everyone does while riding during monsoon season. Do you say f#ck it im riding? Or is it more like, ill go hit it after the rain? What if your out and it starts pouring? Do you find a tree and hide or what???


    Just checked the weather.com and June 26th they are expecting this High pressure to move out of the way for our Monsoon Season
    ...Dying is the easy part, its living that's the challenge...

  2. #2
    PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
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    I ride and pray it does rain while I'm out to cool me off. My worst monsoon was when I had just stepped on to the lift at Sunrise and about 10 feet off the platform it started hailing and lasted through the whole ride up. Thank god for my full face!

  3. #3
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    Just ride....
    [I][SIZE=1]Speeding beneath a field of blue like a silver speedbird one, all your life's below you, pouring fast to a hazy di

  4. #4
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    look at radar, ride where it's not raining.
    b

  5. #5
    caninus xerophilous
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrweelz
    Just ride....
    Nice idea, but depending on where you live this idea could get you into some serious trouble. Hypothermia, windstorms, flashflooding, and violent electric storms that will get you into religion are far riskier in some places than others.

    So what you said but tailored to your local conditions and what you define as acceptable risk.
    Last edited by SunDog; 06-17-2008 at 04:33 PM.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exodus11
    Noob Question...

    As an AZ Native, i am VERY aware of how brutal our Monsoon's can be. This is going to be my first season riding with the Monsoon's. I am just trying to get a concensus on what everyone does while riding during monsoon season. Do you say f#ck it im riding? Or is it more like, ill go hit it after the rain? What if your out and it starts pouring? Do you find a tree and hide or what???


    Just checked the weather.com and June 26th they are expecting this High pressure to move out of the way for our Monsoon Season
    Once again, we have a monsoon season, we do not have "monsoons", a thunderstorm is a thunderstorm, and the monsoon is a seasonal change in the general wind/weather direction.

    Now, I do not try to ride in thunderstorms, nor do I recommend riding in thunderstorms. I've been caught more than a few times and it is scary. It only takes as little as 15-30 minutes for them to go from zero to precip, and if you're in a heavy one consider the fact that you're on an aluminum bike, probably above surrounding elevation, often in a fairly clear area. In other words a perfect lightning rod. It can be ultra-scary when the lightning and thunder are at the exact same time, and when it starts hailing it is downright painfull. I try to plan my rides to be done by the time the thunderstorms start, or sometimes the entire thunderstorm development gets thrown out of whack and they don't build up until much later or even until the next day when it heats up again, and we also have drier periods during the monsoon season where they won't build up much. It is still possible to ride during monsoon season, but sometimes a little difficult to drive to flagstaff and ride because by 12am, it can be pouring like crazy.

    At lower altitudes you guys have to worry more about flash flooding (due to storms in the mountains), but on the other hand it's more rare for the precipitation to actually reach the ground at those lower elevations as well, so while it might be raining somewhere else, it's less common for it to actually rain in the phoenix valley compared to up here in the higher country. You guys also have to worry about dust-storms. I've been in my share of dust-storms in the desert and those are not cool either.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  7. #7
    caninus xerophilous
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    I was unaware that aluminium is anything but a conductor. And as far as I know conductors do not attract lighting, as you stated things above the surrounding elevation may do such. So if lightning strikes close enough to conduct into your frame, my guess is that you would be toast anyways.

    http://www.lightningtalks.com/lightningfacts.htm

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunDog
    I was unaware that aluminium is anything but a conductor. And as far as I know conductors do not attract lighting, as you stated things above the surrounding elevation may do such. So if lightning strikes close enough to conduct into your frame, my guess is that you would be toast anyways.

    http://www.lightningtalks.com/lightningfacts.htm
    Well, my main point wasn't that any one of those things would "cause" you to get struck by lightning, just your chances of getting hit by lightning in a thunderstorm with all of those criteria met are probably higher, not that any one is a sure-way to get hit, because they're not, and I wouldn't be alive right now if they were.

    BTW, Aluminum is a great conductor, it completes the circut in the power system within our aircraft. Alternator and battery are grounded to the airframe, and all the components are grounded to the airframe, the current goes into the ground, into the components, then back through the wires that connect to the battery and alternator from the other direction.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    caninus xerophilous
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    Hmmm?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    BTW, Aluminum is a great conductor, it completes the circut in the power system within our aircraft. Alternator and battery are grounded to the airframe, and all the components are grounded to the airframe, the current goes into the ground, into the components, then back through the wires that connect to the battery and alternator from the other direction.
    Yeah, I knew that. Thats how technicians read wires end to end on an aircraft, by using it as the ground.

    Lightning can be effin scary, it's so random. It's like being in an artillery barage, you give in to faith.

    Ever been struck by it while in flight?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunDog
    Nice idea, but depending on where you live this idea could get you into some serious trouble. Hypothermia, windstorms, flashflooding, and violent electric storms that will get you into religion are far riskier in some places than others.

    So what you said but tailored to your local conditions and what you define as acceptable risk.
    --Meh, yeah you could consider all of that but why, just be prepared and ride, the storms here really only threaten flashflooding over any other place.
    [I][SIZE=1]Speeding beneath a field of blue like a silver speedbird one, all your life's below you, pouring fast to a hazy di

  11. #11
    Meatbomb
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    I strap a one iron to my camelbak. not even god can hit a one iron.

  12. #12
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    You mean we don't get any insulation from having rubber tires ? darn,
    I was thinking maybe the rubber would help, as it does with cars.

    Seriously though, our tundertorms are a real threat.
    I have to pay attention to this as I usually ride in the aft.
    Usually I try to look at where the development is and what direction theuy are
    heading before I decide where to ride. When riding in SunDog's neck of the woods
    in years past it can be tricky tp predict as the storms can roll over
    Samaniego Ridged and be upon you with little warning.
    I've been riding in the lower Catalinas mostly lately because of the heat, but I may need to change my times to more AM since that can be especially dangerous.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunDog
    Yeah, I knew that. Thats how technicians read wires end to end on an aircraft, by using it as the ground.

    Lightning can be effin scary, it's so random. It's like being in an artillery barage, you give in to faith.

    Ever been struck by it while in flight?
    Close, but not struck in flight. There were several times when we had to "get it on the ground" pretty fast, because of the thunderstorms and lightning in the area, also when I was ferrying one cross-country.

    As bad as those encounters were, they have nothing on the time I was comming down Bill Williams Mtn in a bad bad thunderstorm and it was striking within a few hundred feet (it also struck real close to our house last year), I was scared shitless because it was raining HARD and lightning the whole way down, I think I just barely survived that one.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  14. #14
    caninus xerophilous
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Close, but not struck in flight. There were several times when we had to "get it on the ground" pretty fast, because of the thunderstorms and lightning in the area, also when I was ferrying one cross-country.

    As bad as those encounters were, they have nothing on the time I was comming down Bill Williams Mtn in a bad bad thunderstorm and it was striking within a few hundred feet (it also struck real close to our house last year), I was scared shitless because it was raining HARD and lightning the whole way down, I think I just barely survived that one.
    I was a passenger in a medium turbo prop in Florida and we got stuck in a cell, the color weather display was all orange and red, and like a dumbass I had my seat belt off.

    I forget what the phenomena is termed, but there was a mass pressure change and the plane plummeted several hundred feet with me pinned to the roof, followed shortly by a WWF body slam to the floor as we abruptly regained the lost altitude.


    Last summer, desperate for a ride, I challenged a monsoon season afternoon T-storm and suffered the dreaded cloud burst, accompanied by a Biblical lightning storm and a very stiff wind, It started a distant dark cloud on Sammie, and then, it was on me, like the dark clouds in the Omen. Followed by flashflooding and fighting of hypothermia. Not sure if I pooped my pants, 'cause it would have been washed away in the deluge.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunDog
    I forget what the phenomena is termed, but there was a mass pressure change and the plane plummeted several hundred feet with me pinned to the roof, followed shortly by a WWF body slam to the floor as we abruptly regained the lost altitude.
    It's called huge F-ing updraft and downdraft, which is common in a thunderstorm. You can go up several thousand feet per minute, then the same in the opposite direction, with little or no aircraft control. If going through the thunderstorm doesn't rip the airplane apart (which can easily happen) then the occupants are in for a ride they won't soon forget.

    Aircraft are supposed to stay 20NM away from any thunderstorms, but routinely this does not happen. Why? Because there's no one out there saying "oh, that blob of yellow and red is a thunderstorm", you get thunderstorms embedded in weather, or they simply figure that if the intensity is less than a certain amount, then it is not a thunderstorm, but that line of thinking isn't quite correct, because it can still be a thunderstorm, and it can gain intensity pretty fast. The commercial airliners push this issue pretty far, too far in my opinion, and a quite a few aircraft have crashed due to the excessive downdrafts and windshear produced by the thunderstorms, usually on takeoff or landing. Unfortunately the pressure is on the pilots to complete the flight and not land somewhere that the passengers did not pay to go. They walk a fine line and in my opinion they cross it too many times.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  16. #16
    I am Walt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    I strap a one iron to my camelbak. not even god can hit a one iron.
    World Class, Phillbo, World Class...had me laughing out loud...

    Except you'd have to edit to say that Tiger could hit one...
    Ride more; post less...

  17. #17
    "Yabut"
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    I strap a one iron to my camelbak. not even god can hit a one iron.
    Now THAT'S Funny!

    And on a serious note: Don't ride during a thunderstorm.
    ~Aaron~
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  18. #18
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    One time as I was cresting a long hill near the 51 on T100, the wind grabbed my front tire, and pulled it just enough that my next pedal stroke (while yanking on the bars) let the front tire lift and replant 1 foot over. I fell down and laughed how I could crash uphill going 2 mph!

    As far as rain- down here hypothermia is gonna be rare, but up in Jayem country where it's tough enough not to get into a Deliverance situation, you could freeze to death pretty quick.

    Lightning, mitigate the risk and ride if you feel comfortable.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    I strap a one iron to my camelbak. not even god can hit a one iron.
    gold.


    op- if you are riding in flagstaff during monsoon season, simply make sure you start early enough to be off the trail by 12-1... if you are really spooked, anyway. the storms tend to be be quick moving and spotty (albeit violent) although some days it seems like the storms cover the entire peaks.

    i dont always follow that time schedule i mentioned above and have got caught in some pretty crazy storms but most of the time things pan out just fine... ive often been rained on lightly while coming down schultz or lower moto and by the time my bike is in the truck its dumping.

    carry a good shell and plan on being done by 12-1 and you will be fine 90% of the time.
    Last edited by happy_ending; 06-18-2008 at 11:16 AM.

  20. #20
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    I usually don't worry about monsoons when riding in the desert. The "typical" storm will start blowing lots of dirt around and you'll smell the rain long before it comes. When it gets to that, start heading back to home/car.

    That being said, 2 summers ago I was totally blindsided by a mid-September monsoon storm that scared the bezeejus out of me. This was on a road ride (gasp). I was riding up to the Bartlett Lake towers by myself. When I got to the top I saw ths storm moving in from the northwest. It looked like it was pretty far off so my plan was to ride back down as fast as I could and beat it. I don't think I made it 3 miles down the hill before all sh!t broke loose. The wind started blowing so hard that I had to pedal *hard* just to keep 15mph downhill. Then the rain and hail came in sheets. I pulled over and huddled under a scrawny little Palo Verde tree that did nothing to keep the hail off me. I was in a sleeveless jersey and the temperatures dropped about 30-40 degrees. Needless to say I was freezing to the point where i could not feel my hands or feet. I bet at least 5 inches of rain fell because Cave Creek Road up on that hill was flooded over with water (at least 12" deep - cars were struggling to move). Luckly a group of Mexicans in a landscaping truck saw me shivering under that tree and picked me up (they didn't speak any English) and drove me down into Carefree where I could call for help.

    Now where it gets *really* scary is Flagstaff. Monsoon storms up there don't mess around. It will literally go from sunny and calm to a wicked lightning storm in less than 20 minutes. I've had countless times where I was on the top of the mountain...heard the first few "booms"...tried to race down to beat the storm only to end up huddling under a little tree hoping not to get killed by hail. Now I just plan on being off the mountains by 2pm at the latest in July-August.

    Thx...Doug

  21. #21
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    Just be super careful riding in thunderstorms.

    Areas to generally avoid:
    -Ridgelines
    -Areas with lots of deadfall and widowmakers
    -Exposed flat areas
    -Higher elevations
    -Washes or trails that cross many washes (flash flood danger)
    -Sedona (no this isn't a hit on traildoc, I've been on MANY rescues in the Sedona area due to people getting stuck on the slickrock during thunderstorms, also flash flood events frequently happen over the canyon walls.)

    Areas that are better but not still not awesome:
    -Healthy forests
    -Mid altitude terrain
    -Other areas of the country.

    Basically what I'm saying is that the risk is generally not worth the reward. Ride early morning and in the Mogollon Rim area try to be done by 11, elsewhere by 12-1. Check radar periodically, know where the storms are, you WILL get flash flood events at low elevations due to rain in the mountains.

  22. #22
    oh Lucky me
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    Thanks all, i think this is all good information not only for a noob on the mt bike but for a noob to AZ...thank god for the 'dumb motorist law' lol
    ...Dying is the easy part, its living that's the challenge...

  23. #23
    Don't believe the Hype...
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    If it looks like a big one is coming, I usally gear up and try to go just as it passes. Last year I got a great ride in right after one had passed. It had been 110 all day, then as soon as it passed it felt like 80 (probably really 95). Sticky trails, still some cloud cover, all the dust out of the air...It was such a nice relief from the heat, without the 2 hour drive up north.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianc
    look at radar, ride where it's not raining.
    B, you owe me a key board, I lost my drink on it when I read your post,LOL.

    Thx John

  25. #25
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    Also

    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    I usually don't worry about monsoons when riding in the desert. The "typical" storm will start blowing lots of dirt around and you'll smell the rain long before it comes. When it gets to that, start heading back to home/car.

    That being said, 2 summers ago I was totally blindsided by a mid-September monsoon storm that scared the bezeejus out of me. This was on a road ride (gasp). I was riding up to the Bartlett Lake towers by myself. When I got to the top I saw ths storm moving in from the northwest. It looked like it was pretty far off so my plan was to ride back down as fast as I could and beat it. I don't think I made it 3 miles down the hill before all sh!t broke loose. The wind started blowing so hard that I had to pedal *hard* just to keep 15mph downhill. Then the rain and hail came in sheets. I pulled over and huddled under a scrawny little Palo Verde tree that did nothing to keep the hail off me. I was in a sleeveless jersey and the temperatures dropped about 30-40 degrees. Needless to say I was freezing to the point where i could not feel my hands or feet. I bet at least 5 inches of rain fell because Cave Creek Road up on that hill was flooded over with water (at least 12" deep - cars were struggling to move). Luckly a group of Mexicans in a landscaping truck saw me shivering under that tree and picked me up (they didn't speak any English) and drove me down into Carefree where I could call for help.

    Now where it gets *really* scary is Flagstaff. Monsoon storms up there don't mess around. It will literally go from sunny and calm to a wicked lightning storm in less than 20 minutes. I've had countless times where I was on the top of the mountain...heard the first few "booms"...tried to race down to beat the storm only to end up huddling under a little tree hoping not to get killed by hail. Now I just plan on being off the mountains by 2pm at the latest in July-August.

    Thx...Doug
    Very strange D,

    Myself and three others were riding P and D, being summer, that is how we were prepared. We were at the foot of Granite Mountain like you said
    "all hell broke loose". We quickly scrambled to higher ground, we knew the trails and washes would be running soon. We even had a funnel cloud trying to form, scary. You know how long the storm lasted. I can not imagine how bad the exposure was on the road, at least we had some wind breaks. It finally quit and we rode back down 5 to 22 to 23 to 20, all filled up to the hubs with water and some critters...We even checked the weather before the start or we could have done this;

    brianc
    mtbr member

    look at radar, ride where it's not raining.


    Thx

    John

  26. #26
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    Screw the Monsoon weather just go out and ride your bike. What’s the chance out getting stuck 1 in a million. You could get hit by a car walking to get the mail or chock on your wife’s cooking I know I‘ve had your wife‘s cooking. I like riding in the rain it fills so good and revives me for more riding. That ride we did with Circusubet that day was really cool and cant wait till the next Monsoon ride. Remember Get Out And Ride Life Is Good……….Darren……….

  27. #27
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    To protect yourself from flash flooding, always ride with a snorkle. To protect yourself from hail, ride in a bubble wrap jersey. Lighting? Dunno. Maybe ride with a leather strap in your mouth so you don't bite your tounge when you get goosed with enough giga watts to launch your time machine to 1984.

    Seriously, I try not to ride in a thunderstorm if possible. Even in Prescott, I doubt I'd get hypothermic, but definately uncomfortable. The real threat is the lightning.

  28. #28
    Ouch, I am hot!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Once again, we have a monsoon season, we do not have "monsoons", a thunderstorm is a thunderstorm, and the monsoon is a seasonal change in the general wind/weather direction.
    Yea, yea, yea. Monsoon, pontoon, balloon. Everyone knows what we are referring to when we say monsoon.




    When thunderstorms are forecast, keep an eye on the sky and when a thunderstorm threatens, stay indoors or in an automobile (not a convertible).

    Do not use the telephone except for emergencies.
    If you are caught outside, avoid tall, isolated trees and utility poles. Avoid projecting above the landscape; don't stand on a hilltop. In a forest seek shelter in a low area under a thick growth of small trees. In open areas go to a low place such as a ravine or valley.
    Get off and away from open water. Avoid tractors, farm equipment, motorcycles, golf carts and other metal vehicles. Avoid lines, wire fences, metal pipes and railings. Put down golf clubs. If you are in a group in the open stay several yards apart.
    If you are caught in an open area far from shelter, and you feel your hair stand on end, lightning may be about to strike you. Drop to your knees and bend forward putting your hands on your knees. DO NOT lie flat on the ground.

    Persons struck by lightning receive a severe electrical shock and burns, but they carry no electrical charge. Handling the victim will cause you no harm. Prompt action can revive someone "killed". When a group has been struck, treat the "apparently dead" first.
    The American Red Cross says that if a victim is not breathing, give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until medical help arrives. If the victim is not breathing and has no pulse, the properly trained should administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Victims who appear stunned or otherwise unhurt may also need attention. Check for burns especially at fingers and toes and next to buckles and jewelry.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roverbiker
    To protect yourself from flash flooding, always ride with a snorkle. To protect yourself from hail, ride in a bubble wrap jersey. Lighting? Dunno. Maybe ride with a leather strap in your mouth so you don't bite your tounge when you get goosed with enough giga watts to launch your time machine to 1984.

    Seriously, I try not to ride in a thunderstorm if possible. Even in Prescott, I doubt I'd get hypothermic, but definately uncomfortable. The real threat is the lightning.

    Hypothermia can occur at temperatures of ~90 and lower.

  30. #30
    Meatbomb
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    it's more about exposure than temp.... don't expose yourself

  31. #31
    EDR
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    I make a point to ride Hawes in the afternoons that have a storm brewing. It's beautiful at that time.

    I wouldn't make the same choice in the White Mtn's...too close to all the lightning. It can be down-right scary dangerous in the mountains during monsoon season.

    Here's a few pics from 3 or 4 years ago at Hawes...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  32. #32
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    Deliverance, banjo's.....................just another reason we don't wear spandex up here. Seriously, got drenched in a heavy down pour near Thumb Butte off 318 last year, got to a low place really quick! Jayem is right, up in Flag weather changes super quick up on Elden, we turned back before reaching the top that day and that was a good call.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobdole
    Hypothermia can occur at temperatures of ~90 and lower.
    Ya ya. My point is, in Prescott, you can get soaked in a thunderstorm and usually be back in town in a matter of 20-30minutes. Not quite the hazzard I was exposed to when kayaking amidst glaciers when I lived in Alaska.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roverbiker
    Ya ya. My point is, in Prescott, you can get soaked in a thunderstorm and usually be back in town in a matter of 20-30minutes. Not quite the hazzard I was exposed to when kayaking amidst glaciers when I lived in Alaska.
    True that hypothermia may be rare at lower elevations because you'd essentially have to be immersed in that cool water for an extended period of time (but it can get pretty darn cold at the higher elevations during these storms, hypothermia is definitely possible). In my experience, while uncomfortable, getting soaked is the least of your worries in a thunderstorm. It's not getting a little soaked for 20-30 min, it's rain that is fierce enough to hurt, let alone what happens when it starts to hail. Add to that the dangerous flash-flooding and the lightning danger, and it's no joke at all. I'm not sure how many people have "really" ridden in a developed thunderstorm, but it's not safe and in no way is it a good idea.

    In any case, as far as hypothermia is concerned, do not discount the temps and cooling effect up at higher altitude. We're talking temps 50 degrees and less, and when you're soaked it gets cold fast. The lower you are in altitude the less of an issue this probably is, but Flagstaff at 9000 feet on a day like that is going to get cold FAST if it starts preciping, so that 60-something degrees falls rapidly. I'd be carefull about discounting it.

    Bobdole probably is implying that the right factors can come together, such as immersion over extended periods, the effects of the cold and elements when your body is otherwise drained, evaporative cooling, and so on.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    True that hypothermia may be rare at lower elevations because you'd essentially have to be immersed in that cool water for an extended period of time (but it can get pretty darn cold at the higher elevations during these storms, hypothermia is definitely possible). In my experience, while uncomfortable, getting soaked is the least of your worries in a thunderstorm. It's not getting a little soaked for 20-30 min, it's rain that is fierce enough to hurt, let alone what happens when it starts to hail. Add to that the dangerous flash-flooding and the lightning danger, and it's no joke at all. I'm not sure how many people have "really" ridden in a developed thunderstorm, but it's not safe and in no way is it a good idea.

    In any case, as far as hypothermia is concerned, do not discount the temps and cooling effect up at higher altitude. We're talking temps 50 degrees and less, and when you're soaked it gets cold fast. The lower you are in altitude the less of an issue this probably is, but Flagstaff at 9000 feet on a day like that is going to get cold FAST if it starts preciping, so that 60-something degrees falls rapidly. I'd be carefull about discounting it.

    Bobdole probably is implying that the right factors can come together, such as immersion over extended periods, the effects of the cold and elements when your body is otherwise drained, evaporative cooling, and so on.
    Exactly. Monsoon event thunderstorms are nothing to screw around with. I got stuck up on bell rock in one while trying to rescue a dude who had been up there for 18 hours, hanging on the side of that thing. Visibility went to near zero, the lightning/thunder was LOUD, BRIGHT and DISORIENTING, and the rain/hail/wind was unrelenting. I never want to be in that again. Ever.

  36. #36
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    You know I have seen the storms come and go and even just totally go around and never see any rain at all. I was out at 40ST Park one afternoon last summer with two other riders. A storm was brewing it circled around us for some time and then it hit. It rained for 15 min and that was it just enough to get you cooled off. Then I have seen storms like bobdole was talking about when you can’t see ten feet. You know those were all grate rides and I never complained. We have some riders in our group that see lightning or cloud building up and then go home. Then there are those riders like me that don’t mind the monsoon rains and are just glad to get out and ride with friends………….

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowrider
    You know I have seen the storms come and go and even just totally go around and never see any rain at all. I was out at 40ST Park one afternoon last summer with two other riders. A storm was brewing it circled around us for some time and then it hit. It rained for 15 min and that was it just enough to get you cooled off. Then I have seen storms like bobdole was talking about when you can’t see ten feet. You know those were all grate rides and I never complained. We have some riders in our group that see lightning or cloud building up and then go home. Then there are those riders like me that don’t mind the monsoon rains and are just glad to get out and ride with friends………….
    Do you live in phoenix? Yes, the monsoon rains rarely reach the desert floor and due to this you generally don't have the intense thunderstorms that other places see, although you do still see some of them. You have more risks of flash flooding due to the downpours that are just outside of the valley.

    On the other hand, "monsoon rains" can mean severe thunderstorms in other areas and at times, the ones that you do not want to be in.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  38. #38
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    Well I guess you are right if your doing a lot of riding in the washes. But like they say if the washes are flowing don’t cross them. I haven’t see a really good monsoon here for some time like the ones in the 80’s. It seems to rains more in the winter time then in the summers. Well I hope it rains soon it was 114 today

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowrider
    Screw the Monsoon weather just go out and ride your bike. What’s the chance out getting stuck 1 in a million. You could get hit by a car walking to get the mail or chock on your wife’s cooking I know I‘ve had your wife‘s cooking. I like riding in the rain it fills so good and revives me for more riding. That ride we did with Circusubet that day was really cool and cant wait till the next Monsoon ride. Remember Get Out And Ride Life Is Good……….Darren……….

    I agree 100%

    If I get struck by lightning one of two things will happen:

    1. I die instantly and never saw it coming. Not a bad way to go.

    2. I live and have an awesome story to tell.

    The chances of being struck are so slim I don't even consider lighting a real threat. Chupacabra on the other hand.........scaaaary stuff
    JRA

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Do you live in phoenix? Yes, the monsoon rains rarely reach the desert floor and due to this you generally don't have the intense thunderstorms that other places ......
    I can't speak for Phoenix and other more western areas of the state, but this is
    definitely not true in Tucson. They more often than not do reach the desert floor,
    it all depends on your location, tho. In Tucson one area of town can be deluged and another totally dry. The monsoons affect Tucson eastward much more than Phoenix.
    This is reflected in our higher annual rainfall.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by le_buzz
    I can't speak for Phoenix and other more western areas of the state, but this is
    definitely not true in Tucson. They more often than not do reach the desert floor,
    it all depends on your location, tho. In Tucson one area of town can be deluged and another totally dry. The monsoons affect Tucson eastward much more than Phoenix.
    This is reflected in our higher annual rainfall.
    Tucson is higher than phoenix, also right next to much higher mountains that act as a catalyst.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  42. #42
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    Fun lightning casualties info

    The top ten states in number of lightning casualties (deaths and injuries combined). Florida leads the list, with twice as many casualties as any other state. Other states represented are Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Colorado and Texas.

    AZ isn't even on the list
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