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Thread: Knocked out

  1. #1
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    Knocked out

    Woke up being strapped to a board, spent 2 days in the hospital getting scanned and probed. Recovering now. No memories.

    Looking at the bike, it looks like the chain broke, the rest is history. I can't help but think my clips were too loose also. I had the fork on ETA, and it was completely compressed down, suggesting that I fell on it when i uncoupled.

  2. #2
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    Sorry to hear that. Recover , new chain and get out and ride .

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    Any memory on where this happened, and who found you?
    Glad you're doing ok...crazy stuff happens sometimes...hope you have a speedy recovery.
    07 GF Rig

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    No memory at all. I was on the road to the trails.

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    Damn.....thats a scary situation to wake up to Glad your doing better and hope you recover quick. So it wasn't a hit and run or anything, just a freak accident involving equipment failure?

    Take it easy, rest up, get better and and hopefully you'll be back on the trails in no time Good luck!

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    Yes I hope you get a fast recovery, were you wearing a helmet by chance?
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    Glad you made it through.

    A good reminder that one of these are a great thing to have: Road ID

    I wear one because I'm more worred about getting to the trails than what I actually do on the trails.

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    Glad to hear you are OK. My friend fell last week on a smooth, uniform part of a trail, wearing a helmet. She hit her head and is in a coma for 7 days now. We're all hoping and praying that she'll be OK, but we have no idea what the outcome will be. We also have no idea why she crashed. You say you wear a helmet because you are more worried about what would happen getting to the trails than on them - any idea where you'd be today if you hadn't had it on? I feel naked without one any more, and have to admit I have been riding very tentatively on my bike the last week.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
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    Sorry - my bad - it wasn't the OP that said they ride with a helmet more because of the road ride... Though they are probably right about that in 90% of the cases.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
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    I meant I wear the Road ID because I'm worried about riding on the road. I wear my helmet just riding around in front of my house!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATBScott
    Glad to hear you are OK. My friend fell last week on a smooth, uniform part of a trail, wearing a helmet. She hit her head and is in a coma for 7 days now. We're all hoping and praying that she'll be OK, but we have no idea what the outcome will be. We also have no idea why she crashed.


    Sounds like she lost consciousness for some reason then crashed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cru_jones
    I meant I wear the Road ID because I'm worried about riding on the road. I wear my helmet just riding around in front of my house!
    Good point, I wear my Road ID now, for a few reasons. The obvious is because I usually ride alone, and I am on Coumadin (blood thinners). Doctor says I shouldn't even be on a bike, but I can't imagine that. With Road ID, I might just save my life if this type of event occurred and I was discovered on the trail. +1 for Road ID.
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    In my case, it was a totally freak thing as best I can tell. I am recovering very quickly though, slept through last night with no pain killer.

    I have busted my chain a dozen times in the last 2-4 years, and once or twice, it gave me a whipping.

    I was found in the street, I was crossing Ranch Circle on the power line access road enroute to the usual warpaint entrance.

    What is interesting is the damage assessment try to reconstruct something I don't remember. My ETA fork was completely compressed, which tells me I fell on the stem when the chain broke. Also likely complicit, is that I know my clips are too loose. I probably fell out of the clips (scrape marks on shoes) when the crank went loose.

    Freaky thing. You spend countless hours running down the ragged edge, and the weirdest thing sneaks up and bites you while you are just cruisin on pavement.

    There was a witness or 2, "he just fell down". Paramedics were trying to screen for history of seizures, till one of them was helping load the bike in my wifes truck, and saw the chain wrapped around the sprocket.

    I have a black and blue cheek that didn't break, and a lightly damaged helmet that obviously took an impact. All in all though, I feel like a lightweight for how seemingly little it took to "do me in". I am sure the helmet was a benefit, but also think that if I had more coverage, it might have been a better outcome...but just guesswork.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pynis McDermott
    Good point, I wear my Road ID now, for a few reasons. The obvious is because I usually ride alone, and I am on Coumadin (blood thinners). Doctor says I shouldn't even be on a bike, but I can't imagine that. With Road ID, I might just save my life if this type of event occurred and I was discovered on the trail. +1 for Road ID.
    I don't mean to be judgmental at all. Rather, my intent is only to help. Being anticoagulated on coumadin is no joke. If you haven't been on it long or don't know much about it, I hope you take the time to read about it and learn how very real and serious the risks of bleeding are. We all make calculated risks on a daily basis; I can respect that. I just want to make sure that this big (in my opinion) risk that you are taking is in fact calculated and not just because you don't know how big it is.

    I just operated on someone this morning due to bleeding which was directly related to his being anticoagulated. We don't know if he'll live or not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by masterp2
    I have busted my chain a dozen times in the last 2-4 years, and once or twice, it gave me a whipping.
    Good to hear that you are still in one piece for the most part. Out of curiosity, what brand chain do you roll with?
    It's only skin, it'll grow back!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel


    Sounds like she lost consciousness for some reason then crashed.
    While that is possible, it is also possible that she just got distracted and swerved and lost control, a bug flew in her face, she took her hand off the bar for some reason... We just don't know. Probably never will. Hopefully she will recover fully - but I hope that she does not recall the crash or it's aftermath. If I could forget it and wipe that portion of my memory clean - I would.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living


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    a dozen time in 2-4 years? please tell me that is an over-estimation? Either you are doing something wrong or must be ridding thousands of miles per year.......
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPIDERS
    Good to hear that you are still in one piece for the most part. Out of curiosity, what brand chain do you roll with?
    SRAM chains generally. Not particularly brand loyal, just seems to be what I end up with. The chain that I was on had been repaired twice, I generally discard it after 3 breaks, this was #3. Maybe I should be more conservative, especially with a 48 year old head.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ttocs
    a dozen time in 2-4 years? please tell me that is an over-estimation? Either you are doing something wrong or must be ridding thousands of miles per year.......

    maybe an overestimation. About one chain a year. I ride frequently. About 10-15 miles a day as an average. I am also 190 or so, and hard on chains, while not the best at driveline tweaking or keeping it wet.

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    wow, a rough way to learn that if you take care of your bike, and it will take care of you I guess?

    I have been in one situation where I got to wake up with scrambling medical people all around me and then noticed I was the patient, not a good way to wake up. Hope everything is ok.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ttocs
    wow, a rough way to learn that if you take care of your bike, and it will take care of you I guess?
    I don't think that was the main takeaway here. In fact, without a memory to know just exactly what happened, there won't be any hard conclusions.

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    I don't think that was the main takeaway. This can happen to anyone actually. I prefer this to a litter extraction off National.

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    I thought a few posts above, you pointed to a chain that you knew was weak and had broken before and that your pedals were too loose. Forgive me for making an assumption we all know how that ends. Shtuff just happens I guess.
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    I speculated on cause based on the things I could find. The reality is, its pretty much speculation on my part, and taking responsibility is my inclination. I guess I am saying, using a chain that has known history isn't my idea of how to kill yourself, but based on new information , I may just change my mind.

    Is there a prevalent opinion that breaking a chain once means it should be replaced? With all the risks I've taken on a bike, the last thing I expected was for something like this.

  25. #25
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    typically a chain break just means you ain't gonna make the climb. if the chain whips perfectly it will lodge between the rear tire and the frame. when the wheel jams, the forward momentum of your carcass will throw you over the bars, even though it was the back wheel that locked up. been there, done that. sorry for your head plant. thats my guess. hope you're back on the trail soon
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    Hey P, heal up.

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    Thanks for everyone's positive wishes. I will be glad just to get through a day, remembering how the day started. I feel good minute to minute, but simple tasks require naps.

    I went from "10-second Tom" on Thurs, to 10-minute Tom on Friday, to 10-hour Tom, today.

  28. #28
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    I hope you have a speedy recovery!

    A couple of reccomendations for you.....

    Replace your helmet before you get back on the bike.Helmets are a one time use only item, the one that you were wearing did its job and is done now retire it and get a new one.

    Chains, after they break once replace it! Don't wait for it to break a couple more times! What is cheaper a $20-30 chain or the co-pay for a visit to the hospital?

  29. #29
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    Any chain suggestions for strength and durability that stand out?

  30. #30
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    Yep freak things do happen and I do agree with ttocs on the bike thing. I have had a few wrecks due to bike malfunctions, and since then I allways do a complete go over on my bike after and before each ride now. Its worth taking the time to do since this could have happened to u in much worse places and god forbid somewhere that no one would pass to help.
    Heal up soon! Best wishes!
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.- Julie Furtado

  31. #31
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    Was LL Cool J spotted anywhere near the scene?
    This is just need to know information: Am i supposed to enjoy the irony or pity the sincerity?

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    it doesn't take much to make a big problem. Compount that with the areas we ride at and it can get serious really fast. This time it happened in a populated place where someone saw you, what would have happened 6 miles into the long loop out at mcdowel mountain park? Because of this I always make sure that if I ride alone I tell at least ONE person where I am going, what trail I am on, and what time they should be worried if they do not hear back from me. I would normally just send a text to my ride buddy and tell him if he didn't hear from me by X:XX to send someone to go kick the coyote's off of me.

    I normally go with what ever chain the shop recomends myself but after it breaks its time is really limited. How are you shifting? Do you end up with combinations where you have the small chain-ring up front and the little one in back or visa-versa? I use to break alot of chains before a buddy pointed out that my shifting was resulting in the chain being pulled into those positions and that caused it to wear out early. You have 27 gearing combinations but that doesn't mean you should use them. Use the first 3-4 small gears in the back with the large ring up front(both on the right side of the gear-train), use the next 3-4 in the backs middle with the front middle, and this will keep the chain straight and still allow you to go through the gears evenly.
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  33. #33
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    Worst fall due to chain break

    The worst fall I ever took from a long-term pain standpoint was a chain break fall. Cranked down hard on the pedals while out of the saddle as I was just getting rolling. Chain broke and the sudden weight on the handle bars washed out the front end. The bike hit the ground first and I landed right on the bike. Caught the end of the handle bar in the ribs hard enough to crack two ribs. Flopped around on the ground trying to catch my breath and get my head around what just happened. Thank God for bar ends because it would have been a lot worse if I landed on the end of a rigid metal pipe.

  34. #34
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    chain check

    >>>masterp2
    >>>Any chain suggestions for strength and durability that stand out?

    Many of the folks on this forum SRAM chains too without much problem.

    Chains are made in batches. There are rare occasions when a "bad" batch gets to market. You should know if you get a bad chain because it will break not long after installation, in which case, take it back and get a new one from another box (hopefully representing another batch).

    If the chain is not too old and you break it, it could be due to a bad shift (the times Iíve broken a chain is usually changing gears in sand Ė I donít do that anymore).

    In any case, if you break a chain, itís critical on the repair that you get rid of bad links and then set the cross pin(s) equally in the side plates. If not, thereís a good chance you will load up one side of the chain and break it again.

    I use my fingernail to test both sides once Iíve repaired the chain to make sure it catches the edge (you could eye ball it too, but without my readers, I donít have a chance).

    The sign of an old chain is not that it starts to break, but rather, it gets wiggly and the shifting deteriorates.

    I ride my xc bike 5-6 days a week on DC and can usually get ~18 months on a chain through proper care.

    Good luck !

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by masterp2
    Any chain suggestions for strength and durability that stand out?

    If you are a Shimano fan xt or xtr, Sram fan 971 or 991. Some will say that Shimano is better than Sram and vice versa, I haven't been dissapointed with either brand so really my best reccomendation is to go with the one that fits your budget and ignore those that bash one or the other.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by masterp2
    Any chain suggestions for strength and durability that stand out?
    A year ago, I hammered and killed a SRAM PC 971. Since then, I have only purchased the PC 991 Cross Step, which is supposed to have stronger rivets. I have it on my HT, and my FS, and have yet to have any issues.
    Making Milk by Day, Beer by Night

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by bweide
    The worst fall I ever took from a long-term pain standpoint was a chain break fall. Cranked down hard on the pedals while out of the saddle as I was just getting rolling. Chain broke and the sudden weight on the handle bars washed out the front end. The bike hit the ground first and I landed right on the bike. Caught the end of the handle bar in the ribs hard enough to crack two ribs. Flopped around on the ground trying to catch my breath and get my head around what just happened. Thank God for bar ends because it would have been a lot worse if I landed on the end of a rigid metal pipe.
    very similar to mine. Intersting because I had slight internal bleeding around my left kidney, they scanned to my pelvis.

    I am pretty much guessing this is what happened to me, though i wasn't on dirt. That left kidney sure took a beating. Left kidney, but right side of head.

  38. #38
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    Probably time to re-evaluate. I do remember a time when chain breakage was a non-issue. The 971 is what I have used of late.

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    I do know how to shift, and use rapid rise for the shift benefits. I unload as a generality, just to preserve the drive train. But I have a feeling this one broke with no shifting.

  40. #40
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    Vic,

    thanks for taking time out of your day to help me out. The bike did shift better, though I will have to get some time and do some cable maintenance.

    I feel guilt coming into your garage, you are a neat freak. I spend a lot of my time just trying to locate my tools.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by masterp2
    Any chain suggestions for strength and durability that stand out?
    Shimano chains used to suck. I broke a lot.

    Sachs chains were better. I broke a few.

    Sachs was bought by Sram, and for the longest time they just used the Sachs chains with the Sram name on em.

    Shimano made a whole new generation of chains with mushroom-shaped pins that keep the links from sliding off (keep it from breaking). They first brought this out with the XTR/dura-ace chain, but it has now watered down to the lower levels. The XTR chain is quite a bit cheaper than the high end SRAM chain. Sram now makes their own chains, but if you are going to get the same technology (the cross-step) it only comes on their highest-end chain and costs a lot more. In the many years that I've been using the NEWER generation shimano chains, I've had NO breaks, and I've toasted at least 3 cassette bodies, outright broke one cassette, have worn out plenty of other components, and so on. I'd go for the XTR, the only caveat is to use the shimano-pin to install the chain (don't just push back one of the pins to install it), although for trailside emergencies a SRAM powerlink works fine and will hold up for a long time.

    If there are some critical parts on my bike that need to be stronger than normal/others, the chain has got to be right up there at the top. The cassette body/freehub mechanism is probably next on the list. I torque the hell out of my bikes, and if I'm riding one bike heavily, 3-4 months is what I get out of a chain before I should replace it. If I ride other bikes in the same time period, it does get longer, but 1 year on one chain for a serious rider is really pushing it, it may or may not fail due to stress, but at that time interval (again assuming that you are riding fairly frequently) you are damaging the cassette and chainrings usually.

    While I think the cost of the cross-step is kind of dumb, I'd either get that or the XT/XTR. Even the shimano LX isn't bad and has the same technology mentioned above, it just isn't coated for corrosion resistance as well. I wouldn't say the shimano's are less strong because they are cheaper, if anything they are stronger in my experience, but you probably also need to change out your chain more frequently.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pynis McDermott
    A year ago, I hammered and killed a SRAM PC 971. Since then, I have only purchased the PC 991 Cross Step, which is supposed to have stronger rivets. I have it on my HT, and my FS, and have yet to have any issues.
    XTR chain on my Turner and now know I prefer SRAM!
    agmtb

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