Injured Rider Awarded Big Win- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Injured Rider Awarded Big Win

    Did any one see this story. Next time I fall down I'm going after the bike shop for selling me lousy tires that don't obviously match up to my amazing tech skills. http://azstarnet.com/business/local/...d25d2387a.html

  2. #2
    dirt visionary
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    WTF! Seriously some people .
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
    arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body.

  3. #3
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    The rider is an a$$hole. OK, so the shop messed up and dude got hurt, it's a mistake on the shop but is it worth potentially putting a shop out of business?

    There is an inherent risk in riding (especially racing) and if you don't check your own bike out before getting on it...suck it.
    JRA

  4. #4
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    Funny, the last line states that he plans to study engineering yet he could not install a chain on a single speed bike on his own. I suck at working on bikes and even I managed to figure that out. Well hope the bike shop had insurance. One more example of people suing for every little thing that happens.

  5. #5
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    The bike shop didn't tighten the wheel. He crashed because of it. If you get your car tires replaced do you recheck all the lug nuts ?
    If you got in an accident because your car tire came off because the lugs were loose do you let it slide ? I doubt it.

    He paid the shop to do something and he assumed they did it. I don't see how he is a villan just because he sued the sacred bike shop.

  6. #6
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    As a matter of fact I do double check my lug nuts after any shop changes/fixes/removes a tire.

    I also double check my bike if it happens to end up in a shop for any work . Last time I got one of my rigs back after a fork service and after checking bolts I found one brake bolts loose and all of my pinch bolts were loose.
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of
    arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body.

  7. #7
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    you're amazing

  8. #8
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    A half million clams, good gravy.

    This accident was preventable, but I have a tough time digesting the party responsibility.

    I guess it won't be long before release forms will be SOP for bike shops.

    I went out on a demo ride once and one the thing has really stuck in my mind ever since was the suggestion, by the guy hosting the demo, that I should check the wheels are securily fastened everytime I jump on a demo bike. Seems like common sense, yet pretty easy to overlook.

  9. #9
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    Had my entire derailleur assembly come apart once because of something similar... It ended up breaking like 5 different things on the bike, making it useless. Luckily I was ok.

  10. #10
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    if everyone bands together and befriends this guy,, he could help sponsor construction of one hell of a bike park.

  11. #11
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    WOW, just WOW.............Drew

  12. #12
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    I do my own wrench work, so of course double check any repairs. I'm afraid that I couldn't afford the settlement if I were held responsible for causing myself to get injured, not to mention the legal fees involved in bringing suit against myself.
    The question isn't who's going to let me, it's who's going to stop me.

  13. #13
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    There is a substantial posting on the Tucsonmtb forums here:

    http://www.tucsonmtb.com/modules.php...ewtopic&t=4241

    I personally think that if you are jumping a BMX bike, you are a complete idiot if you are not using a freaking $10 chain tensioner.

    This guy is supposed to be a 28 year old avid cyclist. He should know to check his equipment HIMSELF before the ride, and to use a tensioner. Landing jumps on a BMX bike trys to yank the wheel forward, especially with a big rider!! And who knows what the shape of the retaining nut was. They are supposed to have little knurls that make them grip better, but with a big rider that just is not enough, and if the wheel has gotten yanked forward a couple times the knurls get smoothed off and are worthless

    You need to use the right equipment for the task. If I try to do a 10 foot drop on a Giant Anthem, and it breaks, who is at fault? If I jump on a BMX bike and don't spend $10 on a chain tensioner then who is at fault?

    The guy was not using proper equipment for him to be jumping, and he won't take responsibility for his actions. Parasitic leach!!

  14. #14
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    if I work at a bike shop I don't have to worry about doing thorough work because bike riders should be expected to recheck everything I do and if it fails it's their fault. Getting paid and having no liability is awesome. What a business model !

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milos'
    Getting paid and having no liability is awesome. What a business model !
    Sounds a lot like Washington.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome. :)

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milos'
    if I work at a bike shop I don't have to worry about doing thorough work because bike riders should be expected to recheck everything I do and if it fails it's their fault. Getting paid and having no liability is awesome. What a business model !
    All they determined was that the right axle moved forward because it was not tight enough.

    Have you ever tried to get a BMX rear axle tight enough to keep it from getting yanked forward by an adult rider landing a jump?

    Of course people on a jury who don't know any better are going to swallow the story that the nut was not tight enough.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    All they determined was that the right axle moved forward because it was not tight enough.

    Have you ever tried to get a BMX rear axle tight enough to keep it from getting yanked forward by an adult rider landing a jump?

    Of course people on a jury who don't know any better are going to swallow the story that the nut was not tight enough.
    This has been my experience with BMX bikes. I can't ever get the rear wheel to stay straight and keep the chain tight with out a tensioner.

  18. #18
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    really your honor, putting a wheel on is rocket science. How can I honestly be held responsible for such a complex process. Ask me to split the atom while your at it.

    But your honor I still want the right to charge people for this complex service .

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by azpoolguy
    This has been my experience with BMX bikes. I can't ever get the rear wheel to stay straight and keep the chain tight with out a tensioner.
    Exactly x 10 !!!

    I worked in a shop for 10 years and would get these young guys that would come in complaining that their axle kept moving forward. The bike is beat to rat *****, and the nuts and axle are half stripped out, and the "kid" weighs 240 pounds. You try to tighten it up, but the nut has no knurls left on it, and you can see where the axle has slid forward in the dropout a half a zillion times. Yet you can't get them to buy a new axle nut for 50 cents, let alone a chain tensioner for $10.

    Yet they will be back in whining about it when the 240# "kid" jumps it 20 feet and the axle moves out of place.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    Exactly x 10 !!!

    I worked in a shop for 10 years and would get these young guys that would come in complaining that their axle kept moving forward. The bike is beat to rat *****, and the nuts and axle are half stripped out, and the "kid" weighs 240 pounds. You try to tighten it up, but the nut has no knurls left on it, and you can see where the axle has slid forward in the dropout a half a zillion times. Yet you can't get them to buy a new axle nut for 50 cents, let alone a chain tensioner for $10.

    Yet they will be back in whining about it when the 240# "kid" jumps it 20 feet and the axle moves out of place.
    Why do you hate fat people ?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milos'
    really your honor, putting a wheel on is rocket science. How can I honestly be held responsible for such a complex process. Ask me to split the atom while your at it.

    But your honor I still want the right to charge people for this complex service .
    Apparently you just don't get it?

    The wheel could have been installed absolutely correctly, but with an adult jumping on it and no chain tensioner, the wheel can easily move forward.

    If you don't use the right equipment it is not the shops fault. You jump your carbon fiber racing hardtail off of 6 foot jumps, it is not the shops fault it breaks. You jump a BMX bike without the proper axle retaining devices, it is not their fault it moves.

    We are not talking about something like leaving the stem bolts loose and the wheel turning. We are talking about an axle that is extremely prone to moving out of place with a large rider no matter how well it is installed, if that rider is too effing cheap to install a $10 chain tensioner.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milos'
    Why do you hate fat people ?
    I said he weighs 240#.

    YOU assumed he was fat.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    Apparently you just don't get it?

    The wheel could have been installed absolutely correctly, but with an adult jumping on it and no chain tensioner, the wheel can easily move forward.

    If you don't use the right equipment it is not the shops fault. You jump your carbon fiber racing hardtail off of 6 foot jumps, it is not the shops fault it breaks. You jump a BMX bike without the proper axle retaining devices, it is not their fault it moves.

    We are not talking about something like leaving the stem bolts loose and the wheel turning. We are talking about an axle that is extremely prone to moving out of place with a large rider no matter how well it is installed, if that rider is too effing cheap to install a $10 chain tensioner.
    ead
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milos'
    ead
    I had forgotten to turn my "Troll Recognition Device" to ON

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    Apparently you just don't get it?

    The wheel could have been installed absolutely correctly, but with an adult jumping on it and no chain tensioner, the wheel can easily move forward.

    If you don't use the right equipment it is not the shops fault. You jump your carbon fiber racing hardtail off of 6 foot jumps, it is not the shops fault it breaks. You jump a BMX bike without the proper axle retaining devices, it is not their fault it moves.

    We are not talking about something like leaving the stem bolts loose and the wheel turning. We are talking about an axle that is extremely prone to moving out of place with a large rider no matter how well it is installed, if that rider is too effing cheap to install a $10 chain tensioner.
    The article doesn't answer your question regarding a chain tensioner. Is it possible he had one? The article did answer your question regarding the wheel installation. It said that expert testimony stated the wheel was not installed correctly, or tight enough. The expert was likely a bike mechanic. The lawyer defending the shop would have told the jury the kid was cheap and did not install a tensioner or that the nuts were worn, if it were true. The bike was purchased in April 2008 and he came in for a new chain in June 2008. The bike was not worn, noe the axle nuts. A problem the shop could have had by bringing up the need for a chain tensioner is that they sold a bike for a specific use that was unsafe without this device, according to them, and you. Probably not a good legal strategy.

    The injury sounded horrific. A compound fracture of the upper arm. Ouch. I watched a guy on a motorcycle coming straight towards me, try to avoid me by riding tight against the curb at very high speed. He nearly made it but for the wooden street light pole his right foot caught as he road past it. By the time he landed, I saw a long leg bone sticking out through his pant leg and his leg bent 90 degrees. I remember walking up to him and saying; I bet that hurts, don't it? Want me to call an ambulance?

    I dropped my bike at Ajo Bikes this past January and they screwed up the repair, causing me to take it in to another shop near Catalina State Park and then again to a shop in Phoenix. Even if I never read about this lawsuit, I wasn't going to return to Ajo Bikes again.

  26. #26
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    [QUOTE=The Prodigal Son][FONT="Comic Sans MS"]The article doesn't answer your question regarding a chain tensioner. Is it possible he had one?
    It is almost impossible that he had one. Had he had one, then even with a loose axle nut, the axle would not slide forward like that and throw the chain
    The article did answer your question regarding the wheel installation. It said that expert testimony stated the wheel was not installed correctly, or tight enough.
    Of course they are going to say the axle was not tight enough. They sure are not going to admit it could be the fault of having an adult weight rider come down with a great deal of force that can easily yank even a properly tightened axle forward
    A problem the shop could have had by bringing up the need for a chain tensioner is that they sold a bike for a specific use that was unsafe without this device, according to them, and you. Probably not a good legal strategy.
    This is probably part of the problem. Lots of BMX bikes are sold without chain tensioners. All the cheap ones anyways. Usually smaller kids are riding those, and they can work ok in that application. Throw a larger, aggressive rider on a BMX bike, and chances are he will never be able to jump that bike without tensioners and keep the axle in place even when installed properly.(without a tensioner) So yes, the shop is in a catch 22 saying the bike should have had tensioners. I think a 28 year old rider should know better.

  27. #27
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    Of course they are going to say the axle was not tight enough. They sure are not going to admit it could be the fault of having an adult weight rider come down with a great deal of force that can easily yank even a properly tightened axle forward
    Now wait, both sides can bring in experts to testify. The experts testified the axle was not tightened properly. You worked in a shop for ten years. I consider you an expert and you would have testified the axle could have been sifficiently tight for most size riders. You would have added that for a large aggressive rider, there would need to be a chain tensioner in order to prevent this type of accident. You can't be the only expert former shop employee to have this opinion. The lawyer representing Ajo Bikes would have had the ability to put someone just like you on the stand to repeat what you have stated. I think he should have. You made a strong case. I wonder if he did. The article does not talk about opposing views by the various experts. Had it been an older beat up bike that was poorly maintained, I think Ajo would have faired better. If the tensioner came up in testimony and the shop testified they never suggested this rider needed one, despite his size, that would have hurt them. More information is needed to know what led to this decision.

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    I think all bets are off for liability when you use an item for racing or competition, which pretty much makes all warranties null and void. Racing = abusive = failure of parts and operators. No liability is expressed or implied when used for racing, period. As a racer, it's a given you either maintain the equipment and service it yourself, or you are on a team and have a dedicated mechanic you know and trust with your equipment. When you race, you assume the risk of failures.

    I feel AJO is only partly liable in this case, based on what I've read, perhaps 40 or 50% negligent in their services.

    However, as the law is written, AJO needs to put a sign up stating that racing makes them null and void of any liability for work performed, else they assume full 100% liability for any work they do, whether used for trail riding or racing.

    Common sense indicates that every racer pretty much goes over everything on their bike 2 or 3 x before the race, to make sure it is up to the standards of the operator for safety of operation in competition. To not do so is foolhardy and irresponsible. It is no different than a pre flight check a pilot goes through before every flight. If you think about it, jumping a bike through the air is like flying, with take offs and landings. Do the pre flight check before you ride. Check and inspect your landing gear before every take off.
    Last edited by Boyonabyke; 12-25-2010 at 09:52 PM.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyBoy
    I think all bets are off for liability when you use an item for racing or competition, which pretty much makes all warranties null and void. Racing = abusive = failure of parts and operators. No liability is expressed or implied when used for racing, period.
    Who said he was racing? The article said he was on his first run when the failure occurred. That could mean the same as saying you were on your first lap at McDowell. It doesn't mean you were racing or competing. An avid cyclist is different than a competetive cyclist.

    But suppose he was entered in a race and went directly from Ajo to the race. The failure occurred "seconds" into the first run. What difference does it make to jurors if he was seconds into a fun run or seconds into a race? Suppose a formula one car rolls up to the starting line and explodes a second after the race starts. Somebody is in big trouble and they will pay, no matter how they describe formula one racing as being brutal on parts and almost always results in some type of system failure during the race.

    I mentioned on another forum that I took my Suburban to a local Goodyear dealer who rotated my wheels. I drove off and headed home (3-4 miles). I got my gym clothes and headed for the gym. One mile later while driving on Milton, here in Flagstaff, my right front wheel came off and I began sliding along the pavement on my new disc brake rotor. Luckily, I was doing only 25mph at the time. Had I gotten on I-40, I might have rolled the truck and been injured. Goodyear was quick to replace the damaged parts.

    I was riding with a group on Gemini Bridges Trail near Moab years ago and while going downhill at over 20mph, I bunny-hopped a rock slab on the double-track. As I landed in some sand, I had to move my bars around to maintain control of my bike. Suddenly, the front wheel hooked up on firm ground while the wheel was pointing slightly off of center. The side load caused both legs of my Mag 20 to snap off. I went down hard onto a bar end, causing some cracked ribs. The front wheel was still firmly attached to the two 3" pieces of lower fork legs. I contaced Rock Shock and they told me not to show anyone the fork but to send it to them immediately. They first tried to tell me I had damaged the fork in a roof rack. Then they realized the drop-outs were not the problem. They didn't give me a new fork but they did replace the lower legs. Had I been seriously injured, I wonder if I would have received a call from an attorney wanting to go after Rock Shock.

  31. #31
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    $500k for a broken arm? Good grief. I would have assumed maybe $50k...maybe less...considering the guy was racing and you typically do such an activity at your own risk.

    Regardless, it bothers me that (a) the guy sued for such a huge amount of cash and (b) the jury awarded it.

    Had I been in the same situation, I would have asked for compensation for the medical bills and time off work. No more.

    I personally detest people who take advantage of opportunities like this. And you wonder why the USA has become such a litigious society.

    Thx...Doug

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Prodigal Son
    Who said he was racing? The article said he was on his first run when the failure occurred. That could mean the same as saying you were on your first lap at McDowell. It doesn't mean you were racing or competing. An avid cyclist is different than a competetive cyclist.

    But suppose he was entered in a race and went directly from Ajo to the race. The failure occurred "seconds" into the first run. What difference does it make to jurors if he was seconds into a fun run or seconds into a race? Suppose a formula one car rolls up to the starting line and explodes a second after the race starts. Somebody is in big trouble and they will pay, no matter how they describe formula one racing as being brutal on parts and almost always results in some type of system failure during the race.

    I mentioned on another forum that I took my Suburban to a local Goodyear dealer who rotated my wheels. I drove off and headed home (3-4 miles). I got my gym clothes and headed for the gym. One mile later while driving on Milton, here in Flagstaff, my right front wheel came off and I began sliding along the pavement on my new disc brake rotor. Luckily, I was doing only 25mph at the time. Had I gotten on I-40, I might have rolled the truck and been injured. Goodyear was quick to replace the damaged parts.

    I was riding with a group on Gemini Bridges Trail near Moab years ago and while going downhill at over 20mph, I bunny-hopped a rock slab on the double-track. As I landed in some sand, I had to move my bars around to maintain control of my bike. Suddenly, the front wheel hooked up on firm ground while the wheel was pointing slightly off of center. The side load caused both legs of my Mag 20 to snap off. I went down hard onto a bar end, causing some cracked ribs. The front wheel was still firmly attached to the two 3" pieces of lower fork legs. I contaced Rock Shock and they told me not to show anyone the fork but to send it to them immediately. They first tried to tell me I had damaged the fork in a roof rack. Then they realized the drop-outs were not the problem. They didn't give me a new fork but they did replace the lower legs. Had I been seriously injured, I wonder if I would have received a call from an attorney wanting to go after Rock Shock.

    What exactly is Manzanita BMX RACEWAY? Forgive me if I mistakenly assumed that that is a race course, not a multi use trail or single track? Is it a RACE COURSE ? Do you pay to ride there, or to compete? I may rephrase my original post if more facts come to light, but otherwise, if it's a raceway, or a race course, or you are practicing on it, it limits liability, unless the bike is specifically stated to be suitable in the warranty for closed course competition. If not, case closed, in my eyes.

    Your car wheel theory is for daily use, not for racing applications, so a different set of liabilities, and special tools to torque nuts to spec are in force. Try doing that on a car designed to be used on a race course and holding the tire company liable. You forgo public safety laws when you agree to compete, race, etc; which is why at the race course/raceway, there is a form signed for release of liability before use of the land is allowed.

    If I was Ajo, I'd file a lawsuit against the manufacturer of the frame for faulty unsafe design of the rear dropouts. If the bike company can show that the design was never meant for racing, or had weight design limits that were exceeded, then I'd appeal the original case back to the 28 year old for willful neglect of the warranty implied by the bike frame manufacturer.

    In my eyes, the rider is accountable, in this case, due to the nature of racing.
    Last edited by Boyonabyke; 12-25-2010 at 10:49 AM.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    $500k for a broken arm? Good grief. I would have assumed maybe $50k...maybe less...considering the guy was racing and you typically do such an activity at your own risk.

    Regardless, it bothers me that (a) the guy sued for such a huge amount of cash and (b) the jury awarded it.

    Had I been in the same situation, I would have asked for compensation for the medical bills and time off work. No more.

    I personally detest people who take advantage of opportunities like this. And you wonder why the USA has become such a litigious society.

    Thx...Doug
    Doug, I'm guessing that you represent the majority opinion on this topic. But I believe most here have not been in a situation where they went through this. Suppose you spent $10k getting your arm straightened out, and lost another $10k in wages. You say you'd ask for $20k, no more. So you ask Ajo for $20k. They say no way, it was your fault not there's. Now what? Your at home, unable to ride, in pain, not able to work, and you are out $20k. You start making phone calls. You talk to several attorneys who are interested. You tell them you would like to get Ajo Bikes to pay you $20k, no more. They quickly tell you that in order to win a judgment agaist Ajo, they will need to place five staff on the case to do research. They will also need to pay several experts to testify on your behalf. They will not bill you for there work on the case but they expect to be out $50k-$100k before this is over. Plus, they will tell you to visit several doctors who can give you a long term prognosis and also rate the level of permanent damage and disability you incurred. They may tell you to expect additional visits to the doctor over the years to address some of the nerve damage that may or may not increase and become a pain management issue. Once this case is settled, you may lose any opportunity to reopen a case if you have future medical bills associated to the compound fracture and the subsequent surgeries needed to make repairs. There are people who have had a limb removed years after a serious injury, because of complications resulting from surgery.

    Very quickly, you start looking at that $20k settlement you want and realize that in order to get it, you have to hire those bottom feeding attorneys who you have to pay thirty pieces of silver, and then some. I don't think people should detest you for doing what you feel is right for you and your family, when given the totality of the process needed to win judgment. I've personally faced situations like this five times in my life. Won three and settled on two. It is inpleasant to be sure. The losses incurred by taking no action can take years to recover from.


    Sorry about my fonts. My eyes have gone from bad to worse and without a font enlarger, I have to find something I can read without glasses.

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    I had a great Chrsitmas and will not let it be soured money hungry lawyering.
    Don't be trolled by this nonsense. If you were thinking 1/2 a million $ was soo much an award for this situation you were right. There is right and wrong and then there are the folks that exploit people/mistakes/bad luck/chance at any chance they get.

  35. #35
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    As explained by The Prodigal Son, there are many factors involved in a civil suit. One such factor is the amount of insurance coverage a business or an individual carries, which attorneys use a basis for determining the possible dollar value of a civil suit. Another factor is the ability of a business or individual to pay a judgment greater than the insurance coverage limits. This also applies in reverse if there is insufficient coverage/ability to pay or assets available to cover a judgment > insurance coverage, also affecting the possible dollar value of a civil suit. Clients are not able to just state that I want to sue them for XX amount, attorneys are ultimately responsible for filing suit for a specific dollar amount taking into consideration the points brought up by The Prodigal Son. In this case, the returned judgment was IMHO excessive, and apparently the majority of the forum members concur.

    This is why it is always better to carry a large insurance policy!
    On a side note:
    Think about how many ultra expensive automobiles there are on the road today; it would be very easy to exceed ones auto liability insurance in the case of a minor collision due to costs of repairing an expensive automobile. A 100K liability policy could be exceeded without much effort just repairing certain vehicles, not to mention replacement value of an expensive vehicle!
    Something to consider!

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    1,252
    Does it suck that the LBS is out this much money? Yes. Was it their job to fix the bike correctly? Yes. Did they? No. Just because this guy didn't do his own work, or check the work of others does nothing to change the fact that the shop neglected to do their job. Had he given it to a friend to work on, he would be the dummy, but he gave it to PROFESSIONALS to do the work. Whether he was racing at an event, or putsing around the neighborhood is irrelevant IMO since whitnesses all state that he was seconds into his run when this happened, not like ten runs in off a huge jump.

    Should he be awarded 500k? Maybe...He worked as a painter on cars and planes before this and now has problems extending and turning his arm, which is typical for this kind of injury, and that will likely never go away. He was 28 at the time of his wreck, and maybe now has to change careers because of this. Hence now going to school to be an engineer. Probably had multiple surgeries, and tons of rehab for it. All of which costs money. Lots of money. Not to mention the long term disability he will likely have down the road. Between nerve damage, ligamentous injuries, likely arthritis/joint replacements later on, the money seems about right. He didn't ask to break his arm, he asked to have his chain replaced. My point is this, none of us know all the details, but there is likely more to the issue of the settlement than the chance of it being frivolous.

    When I was a mechanic on jets in the AF years ago, we were held accountable for our work. The pilot would do a walk around and look at the jet to make sure the wings were attached and that it looked pretty, but it was not his job to ensure the correct torque was placed on the main landing gear wheel assembly. It was mine. Had he landed and that wheel spun itself off, the squadron commander is not going to ask if the pilot checked its torque. He is going to cart my ass off to get a piss test, check my forms, have all the civilian techs investigate and fry my ass for doing shatty work.

    I don't care if he was a nice guy or an asshat, or whether or not the shop deserves to pay. The basic lesson here is for every LBS out there. STOP hiring stupid drugged out ****** bag employees to do shoddy work on bikes and START having some goddam integrity in your work. Or this kind of thing happens. If he could have checked the bolt, so could the LBS. Flame away...

  37. #37
    Eroding into the trail
    Reputation: DustyBones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    897

    @pwr trainer

    I'm with ya all the way there!

    Been the professional mechanic route also, required to double check my work lest the investigators step in & wreck havoc upon my life.

    500K less 33% (min) for atty fee/incidentals/research/professional testimony = considerably less, but his end result was probably around 260 - 280K, which may still be excessive considering that his health insurance will cover pretty much everything except co-pays for Docs, hospitalization (or outpatient facility), imaging, Rx & PT. Future orthopaedic intervention would be unknown, as would actual limitations of use w/i the 2 yr. time-frame for filing suit due to the recovery period for his injury. Here is where the jury comes in. Big decision on their part to award that much, must have been quite the convincing argument by the atty.! Sloppy defense - unknown!

    Hope the shop was well insured, if so, life/business will go on. These are the hazards of a service industry in a litigious society!

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