I ran out of water today on the Black Canyon Trail- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    I ran out of water today on the Black Canyon Trail

    I ran out of water today on the Black Canyon Trail. I was certain that I had more water in my Camelback but suddenly, when I sucked, no water came out. In the meantime, the temperature was getting hotter and I was still about 4 miles from the trailhead where my car was parked.

    As the temperature continued to rise (it was about 10:30 at this point) I began to feel weak, fatigued, tired and nauseous. I also started to get some chills. However, I figured if I could just make it to the top of the Skyline Segment, I could just coast downhill from there and, for the first time ever, drink water direct from the Agua Fria River.

    Fortunately, I made it to the top of Skyline, but I was feeling weaker. I wondered if I would even make it to river. It got so bad that it felt difficult to even go downhill. I had to stop and take rests. I just kept telling myself I was only a few minutes from the river, and if I got there, everything would be fine.

    I was also wondering where all of the other mountain bikers were. I had passed three others around 8:00 AM and figured I would run into more and ask for some water, but, alas, the mountain was empty. Just me, my bike and the sun.

    I arrived at the river around 11;30 and thankfully began drinking large portions. It tasted awful....it had sort of an algae/moss-like taste along with an earthy feel, no doubt because the river was rather muddy. But, I really needed to drink right away. Unfortunately, after drinking the first bit, my stomach could not handle it and I vomitted it all.

    However, I kept drinking, removed my shoes and socks and laid down in the river. After about a half hour in the water, I started to feel a little better. I refilled my water with the Algae-stuff and managed to limp the remaining mile and a half back to my car.

    So, the moral of the story is, be thankful a river runs through Black Canyon. Otherwise, I'm not sure what I would have done. I've never had to call search and rescue before but I' not sure that my phone had reception there anyway.

    I still wonder if anyone has any idea what kind of affects I can expect after drinking water from the Agua Fria River? I'm hoping that its fairly clean and, given the circumtances, I don't really feel I had any other choice. I'm really hoping I don't come down with some gastrointestinal illness over the next week or so.

    Also, where was everyone today? I assumed there would have been a few more mountain bikers on the trail.

  2. #2
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    Wow, that sounds like a near death experience. Heat stroke is nothing to mess around with.
    We rode out there today but from Emery Hendersen and up around the Pan loop...roughly 4 hours and I went through 100oz of water. (we started at 5AM).
    I don't know anything about all the intestinal issues but my nurse practitioner wife tells me if you feel fine in 24 hours, you're OK.
    Bottom line, is consider this a lesson learned...bring more water and some tablets in your camelbak...just in case. It's all about contingency plans...be sure you have some way to survive!
    Glad you made it out...

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazelem View Post
    I ran out of water today on the Black Canyon Trail. I was certain that I had more water in my Camelback but suddenly, when I sucked, no water came out. In the meantime, the temperature was getting hotter and I was still about 4 miles from the trailhead where my car was parked.

    As the temperature continued to rise (it was about 10:30 at this point) I began to feel weak, fatigued, tired and nauseous. I also started to get some chills. However, I figured if I could just make it to the top of the Skyline Segment, I could just coast downhill from there and, for the first time ever, drink water direct from the Agua Fria River.

    Fortunately, I made it to the top of Skyline, but I was feeling weaker. I wondered if I would even make it to river. It got so bad that it felt difficult to even go downhill. I had to stop and take rests. I just kept telling myself I was only a few minutes from the river, and if I got there, everything would be fine.

    I was also wondering where all of the other mountain bikers were. I had passed three others around 8:00 AM and figured I would run into more and ask for some water, but, alas, the mountain was empty. Just me, my bike and the sun.

    I arrived at the river around 11;30 and thankfully began drinking large portions. It tasted awful....it had sort of an algae/moss-like taste along with an earthy feel, no doubt because the river was rather muddy. But, I really needed to drink right away. Unfortunately, after drinking the first bit, my stomach could not handle it and I vomitted it all.

    However, I kept drinking, removed my shoes and socks and laid down in the river. After about a half hour in the water, I started to feel a little better. I refilled my water with the Algae-stuff and managed to limp the remaining mile and a half back to my car.

    So, the moral of the story is, be thankful a river runs through Black Canyon. Otherwise, I'm not sure what I would have done. I've never had to call search and rescue before but I' not sure that my phone had reception there anyway.

    I still wonder if anyone has any idea what kind of affects I can expect after drinking water from the Agua Fria River? I'm hoping that its fairly clean and, given the circumtances, I don't really feel I had any other choice. I'm really hoping I don't come down with some gastrointestinal illness over the next week or so.

    Also, where was everyone today? I assumed there would have been a few more mountain bikers on the trail.
    How much water did you start with? What kind of medical plan do you have?

  4. #4
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    Good to hear you're ok. That's scarry stuff. The one and only time I bonked/had heat stroke was out there but I a riding buddy (Doug) so at least I knew I was getting out. I had the chills, was not sweating, felt sick and just flat out of any energy and it was also a mind Fuk since I uaually feel great riding. I ended up walking the section from the river up to the BCT trail head since I had massive cramps any time I tried to pedal.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raybum View Post
    Wow, that sounds like a near death experience. Heat stroke is nothing to mess around with.
    We rode out there today but from Emery Hendersen and up around the Pan loop...roughly 4 hours and I went through 100oz of water. (we started at 5AM).
    I don't know anything about all the intestinal issues but my nurse practitioner wife tells me if you feel fine in 24 hours, you're OK.
    Bottom line, is consider this a lesson learned...bring more water and some tablets in your camelbak...just in case. It's all about contingency plans...be sure you have some way to survive!
    Glad you made it out...
    Thanks - I'll have to look into getting some tablets.

  6. #6
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    :I had something similar happen a few weeks ago. I didn't run out of water but felt like I defiinately overheated. I was out on trail 100 and a few miles from my car. I freaked out a little because I was SO nauseated and of course there was no shade to cool down a bit. I have lived here in Phx for almost 30 years now but I still can't ride in the higher temps. Glad you made it back okay. I bet it was scary. Maybe a little whiskey or tequilla could help kill off any residual crud in your stomach from the river....?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    How much water did you start with? What kind of medical plan do you have?
    I started with about 90 Fl. ounce. Obviously, I needed to bring more....my medical plan is pretty good - Blue Cross - so I shouldn't have any issues there unless they try to deny coverage for reckless endangerment or something.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKA Monkeybutt View Post
    Good to hear you're ok. That's scarry stuff. The one and only time I bonked/had heat stroke was out there but I a riding buddy (Doug) so at least I knew I was getting out. I had the chills, was not sweating, felt sick and just flat out of any energy and it was also a mind Fuk since I uaually feel great riding. I ended up walking the section from the river up to the BCT trail head since I had massive cramps any time I tried to pedal.
    It sound like you were on the same section I was - I just read Cosmic Ray's book - here's a nice quote on the Black Canyon Trail "the trail is totally exposed to sun. You can drink 5 quarts of water on a warm spring day."

  9. #9
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    In the hottest/most extreme riding conditions ive been in (not as bad as phx) 100oz/hr is not out of the question. At that rate, salts become very important, but that rate is what to prepare for IME.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzKennedy View Post
    :I had something similar happen a few weeks ago. I didn't run out of water but felt like I defiinately overheated. I was out on trail 100 and a few miles from my car. I freaked out a little because I was SO nauseated and of course there was no shade to cool down a bit. I have lived here in Phx for almost 30 years now but I still can't ride in the higher temps. Glad you made it back okay. I bet it was scary. Maybe a little whiskey or tequilla could help kill off any residual crud in your stomach from the river....?
    I think when I really started to freak out was when I vomited after initially drinking the river water, because I never vomit. I think this is going to make me reevaluate riding in the heat also. I've tried to do several trails this summer, including the Maricopa Trail and Cave Creek, but those trails are much closer to civilization if something goes wrong and a Circle K was never too far away. I think Black Canyon is pretty isloted comparatively...in fact, if you are four miles in, have no cell phone reception and no mountain bikers are around, how would you get help out there? Its a fun trail though - maybe its just better to do it in the winter.

  11. #11
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    Dude,
    Glad you were able to survive the heat.BUT, NO WAY will you not get something from that water. The cows poop in it and there is Giardia (sp) in it as well and you may not have symptoms right away. I would take Cypro for a week or so. If you have none PM me. The cows can carry e-coli as well. Not a doctor but well versed in bad water in third world countries and how to deal with it.

    Take it seriously.

    Steve
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

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    Quote Originally Posted by chipolopolo View Post
    Dude,
    Glad you were able to survive the heat.BUT, NO WAY will you not get something from that water. The cows poop in it and there is Giardia (sp) in it as well and you may not have symptoms right away. I would take Cypro for a week or so. If you have none PM me. The cows can carry e-coli as well. Not a doctor but well versed in bad water in third world countries and how to deal with it.

    Take it seriously.

    Steve


    The most common treatment for giardiasis is metronidazole (Flagyl) for 5-10 days. It eradicates the Giardia more than 85% of the time, but it often causes gastrointestinal side effects such as nausea and a metallic taste as well as dizziness and headache. Despite its effectiveness, metronidazole is not approved by the FDA in the U.S. for treatment of giardiasis.

    The only drug approved for treating giardiasis in the U.S. is furazolidone (Furoxone) for 7-10 days. It is approximately as effective as metronidazole. Tinidazole is available outside the U.S. and is highly effective at treating giardiasis(>90%). It also can be given as a single dose and is well tolerated. Quinacrine is very effective for treating giardiasis but is no longer available in the U.S. Paromomycin and albendazole are less effective than other treatments.

    Occasionally, treatment fails to eradicate Giardia. In such cases, the drug may be changed or a longer duration or higher dose may be used. Combination therapy also may be effective (e.g., quinacrine and metronidazole).











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  13. #13
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    Thanks TD, thats even BETTER advice....

    Steve
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  14. #14
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    I don't know your age, but a fact of life is that as we get a little older, our bodies don't contain as much water as they used to*. This can result in electrolyte imbalance on hot days. Drinking only water can actually make things worse. Electrolyte tablets or some form of electrolytes should help out. In my experience, when one gets to the state you were in today, it’s best to stop and sit in the shade if possible and wait until you feel much better. Trying to push it only makes it worse and is potentially very dangerous. (Not scolding, just offering up some advice).

    Try experimenting with the tablets, sea salt, sugar, and possibly a pinch of baking soda. At the very least start by bringing some electrolyte tablets. Good luck.

    Sorry about your rough riding day. Glad you made it out all right.

    Dash

    *EDIT*
    *Source: Fudamentals of Anatomy & Physiology/Martini,Nath
    Last edited by DashRiprock™®©; 09-27-2011 at 10:42 AM. Reason: list source
    Clearer-er of Prescott trails. Downhill downfall in your way? PM me. Have ax, will travel.

  15. #15
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    I have screwed myself badly several times through out my life here in the desert and its a really scary feeling , I am very glad you ended up safe today after your close call.

    This old desert can really get you jammed up in a hurry , even with a lifelong understanding and several back up plans ....its very easy to end up in real trouble very quickly

  16. #16
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    Dude, I feel for ya. I too have vomited on the trail, with goosebumps and no sweating. Fortunately I was at Hawes the first time and only minutes from my air conditioned truck. Had the same thing happen climbing 24st at SoMo a few spring seasons back. That time just waiting in the shade gave me the needed strength to get through it.

    I wouldn't stress about the water thing. Ya, there's some yakky stuff in there but it's not like we live in a third world country. I've drank from plenty of places I shouldn't have, but truth be told, not as an adult. Just keep an eye out for the *****es. Good luck, glad you made it out. Sounds like you were about as bad as it can get without a rescue situation. The desert is no joke.

    On a side note. Consider a pack that will carry 100oz and have room for another bladder. Ya, it's heavy but if riding alone in a secluded area...in the heat, better safe than sorry. Maybe even a bag with a small amount of salt in it to mix in the water. Won't taste great but what the hell.

    I also keep a small bottle of "Potable Aqua". Never had to use it yet but it takes up no room and it's there should I ever need to kill nasty water.

    To wrap it up, my buddy who is new to AZ said a few weeks back, "lets try BCT this weekend". I said, "sounds like a winter time ride to me", haha.
    Last edited by eatdrinkride; 09-24-2011 at 08:52 PM.

  17. #17
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    I had a similar problem a while back at BCT...thank god for other MTB'ers They nursed me back to the car..saved my life or at least made a bad situation not as bad. I havent been back but I will and when I do I will be loaded up....Go see a Dr.

    Tim

  18. #18
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    Purification tablets I do carry however in this shituation I'm not sure you could wait the 4 hours..
    Directions For Use:

    "Remove one tablet from foil packaging and quickly insert into one liter of contaminated water.
    Allow to react for four hours in an area away from sunlight.
    The treated water is now ready for drinking".

    This steripen option seems like a lightweight good thing to tote around compared to the bulkiness of the Kaydyn filter,,,,

    Glad to here everything came out allright and I'm sure your probably going to go thru your share of T.P. in anycase,,,
    Love the Tequila suggestion . Seedy recovery tooyah!

  19. #19
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    A desert ride with temps around 100, I'm bringing at least 200oz if the mileage is anywhere close to 20 miles. No need to risk it. I really like having water with me, and don't mind the extra weight. Glad you made it out. Sounded pretty serious.
    Today's the day I eat bikes.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dag Nabbit View Post
    A desert ride with temps around 100, I'm bringing at least 200oz if the mileage is anywhere close to 20 miles. No need to risk it. I really like having water with me, and don't mind the extra weight. Glad you made it out. Sounded pretty serious.
    How much does it weigh after uve drank it?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKA Monkeybutt View Post
    Good to hear you're ok. That's scarry stuff. The one and only time I bonked/had heat stroke was out there but I a riding buddy (Doug) so at least I knew I was getting out. I had the chills, was not sweating, felt sick and just flat out of any energy and it was also a mind Fuk since I uaually feel great riding. I ended up walking the section from the river up to the BCT trail head since I had massive cramps any time I tried to pedal.
    Oh ya I remember that ride. I was getting pretty nervous for you...like I might have to carry you out.

    I've had 2 other friends bonk out on a hot ride on the BCT as well and I had to nurse them both back to the car.

    The BCT is one trail I will never ride alone. Not only will you die out there if you run out of water, but you would also be screwed if you broke a leg or had a serious injury -- no cell coverage, and very little traffic.

    Thx...Doug

  22. #22
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    Geez, glad you're OK. At least, I hope you're still OK.

    Those stomach bugs are no joke. If you start vomiting or losing it out the back end get to an E.R. quick like.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javelina View Post
    Purification tablets I do carry however in this shituation I'm not sure you could wait the 4 hours..
    :
    Hmmm...I pretty sure mine say wait 20 minutes. Maybe it's 60. Anyhow, getting the core temp down is most important. A few sips of water at most is really needed in those dire times.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Hmmm...I pretty sure mine say wait 20 minutes. Maybe it's 60. Anyhow, getting the core temp down is most important. A few sips of water at most is really needed in those dire times.
    Straight from REI..

    Purifying water couldn't be easier, simply drop a Katadyn Micropur tablet into a quart of water to drink with confidence and no chemical aftertaste.

    Features the same proven technology used in municipal water supplies, Micropur tablets are effective against viruses, bacteria, Giardia and Cryptosporidium
    Destroys viruses and bacteria in 15 min., Giardia in 30 min. and Cryptosporidium in 4 hrs.


    You are so correct...However Bear Grylls this situation and get cooooooL.........

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javelina View Post
    Straight from REI..

    Purifying water couldn't be easier, simply drop a Katadyn Micropur tablet into a quart of water to drink with confidence and no chemical aftertaste.

    Features the same proven technology used in municipal water supplies, Micropur tablets are effective against viruses, bacteria, Giardia and Cryptosporidium
    Destroys viruses and bacteria in 15 min., Giardia in 30 min. and Cryptosporidium in 4 hrs.


    You are so correct...However Bear Grylls this situation and get cooooooL.........
    Well, 3 out of 4 in 30 mins aint bad And hopefully my wife won't have to give me a dirty water enema.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    Well, 3 out of 4 in 30 mins aint bad And hopefully my wife won't have to give me a dirty water enema.
    ....Hope..now where have I heard that before?......

  27. #27
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    Glad you made it out ok. Like some other said, Giardia can be in the water. I'd check it out with your PCP and hope you don't have it. Definetely take some iodine purification tablets with you or one of those fancy new wand things for an emergency backup. I always have tabs in my pack just in case.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by DashRiprock™®© View Post
    I don't know your age, but a fact of life is that as we get a little older, our bodies don't contain as much water as they used to. ...
    First, glad the OP made it out OK and hope your diarrhea isn't too bad today

    The above quote is pretty interesting. I'm 43 and have noticed recently -- even moreso this summer than last -- that I can't seem to drink "enough" water. I might feel a little thirsty, but I'll have water sloshing around in my stomach.

    Every body is different but I've found, in general, I don't tend to drink as much -- or be able to drink as much -- water as others I ride with.

  29. #29
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    I started out at Emery Hendersen TH at 8am and rode North 13 miles with 100 oz water. Luckily, on the way back I took my last sip 300' from my vehicle. When we finished at 11:40am, there were 3 guys getting ready to start their ride...I hope they made it out OK! Many people have had water issues on BCT.

  30. #30
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    Just wow.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  31. #31
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    Scary bizz. Glad you're here telling the story.

    Gotta take it seriously when it comes to preparing for things to go bad. There have been some great threads on what some people bring with them on their rides A couple of items that NEVER leave my pack that are related to your experience - water tablets, Steri Pen, booney hat, emergancy blanket. All weight less than a pound combined and take up little space. A lighter or matches also gets you a fire to boil with.
    If you're riding remote trails alone... it's a must to have a legit emergency pack. Verizon is also one to add to that list.
    Like a couple have mentioned already. That water is infested with disease from the cattle abusing those holes. There's really no question on IFou got something from the water...

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKA Monkeybutt View Post
    Good to hear you're ok. That's scarry stuff. The one and only time I bonked/had heat stroke was out there but I a riding buddy (Doug) so at least I knew I was getting out. I had the chills, was not sweating, felt sick and just flat out of any energy and it was also a mind Fuk since I uaually feel great riding. I ended up walking the section from the river up to the BCT trail head since I had massive cramps any time I tried to pedal.
    Been there done that. Same spot too.
    “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did." Mark Twain

  33. #33
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    The water was nasty for sure, but I'm not sure he will definitely get sick from it.
    I always wonder how animals drink that crap. Some people just say animal guts are different, or they build up immunity. But even house dogs who drink 99% clean tap water can go into the wilderness and drink from the crappiest mud holes without problems.

  34. #34
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    #1. You're alive. You're not the body that some other trail user discovered. That's good.
    #2. You were able to self-rescue. You're not the out-of-town guy on the evening news they always have to heli out of the preserves. Even better.
    #3. Take extra water.
    #4. Take extra water.
    #5. Take extra water.
    #6. I hope you see that you could have prevented this situation. The BCT is no joke. Even starting at the Emery Henderson TH where the BCT is relatively gentle, there may not be anyone for miles if you need help. And on the hottest days (at the "wrong" time of the day), any trail can kill you.

    I always start with 100 oz. on daytime rides. I also carry at least one back-up water in a 32 oz. Poweraide bottle (I usually freeze it for the summer months...just the right temperature when needed). I also plan on, the very least, getting water sanitizing tablets for my outing that are actually near water.

    #7. Carry a snack. I usually carry pretzels for the salt.
    #8, And if you're doing a new unfamiliar ride.....carry even more extra water!!

    Where was everyone at the BCT? Well, you will definitely see more riders out there once the temps cool. So, most people are waiting for the Fall.......

    Hope you're feeling better. Don't let this discourage you from summer riding or the BCT. Need to plan ahead and ride at the right times.

  35. #35
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    I have been carrying two bladders full of water in my pack on rides.

    As for the worry about Giardia, if the cows and other creatures don't have it, then you should be fine. That is a big IF though. Most people can get through Giardia like they would a stomach flu. If you are strong and have a good immune system you can expect symptoms of diarrhea, excess gas, stomach or abdominal cramps, upset stomach, and nausea.

    Cryptosporidium, is the only thing that would be worrisome, Cryptosporidium, is chlorine resistant and can cause some nasty symptoms.

  36. #36
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    I wonder if it would be a good idea to make an appointment with a GP tomorrow morning for Wed if you are still feeling OK. Then if on Tuesday you are still feeling OK cancel and reschedule for Thursday. That might save you a couple days if you start showing symptoms.

    TD

  37. #37
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    Thanks everyone for the well wishes and advice. As of today (24 hours later), I fortunately don't have any symptoms. However, I think I'll check in with my doctor tommorow just to be on the safe side. Its possible that the symptoms may not manifest until later, as some previous posts have mentioned.

    For those of you that carry so much more water, do you just have a larger Camelback or do you carry extra water in the back pockets of your jersey?

  38. #38
    Ahhh the pain....
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    Gaz...tons of options there... depending on ride length, here's what I do...

    plan 1:
    100 oz bladder in camelbak

    plan 2:
    100 oz bladder in camelbak
    1 24 oz bottle in cage on bike

    plan 3:
    100 oz bladder in camelbak
    2 24 oz bottles in cage on bike

    plan 4:
    100 oz bladder in camelbak
    2 24 oz bottles in cage on bike
    if water source available that can be purified, bring steripen. Otherwise, bring extra 100oz bladder (although I hate to carry this much weight on my back)

    Generally it seems I carry more than I need...not a good thing in endurance races, but good piece of mind when trail riding alone (which I do a lot of).

  39. #39
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    FYI Camelbak has a 200 oz bladder available on the military/tactical side.. a friend just got one, looks like it will fit most 100oz camelback pockets..

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazelem View Post
    Thanks everyone for the well wishes and advice. As of today (24 hours later), I fortunately don't have any symptoms. However, I think I'll check in with my doctor tommorow just to be on the safe side. Its possible that the symptoms may not manifest until later, as some previous posts have mentioned.

    For those of you that carry so much more water, do you just have a larger Camelback or do you carry extra water in the back pockets of your jersey?
    Wow! that's scarry stuff. I carry 100oz blatter but I don't have room for more because I usually have a six pack and blue ice with me. Oh, I don't ride during the day anywhere in the valley during summer it's all night rides and BCT is a great night ride trail. every now and then when I know I am going on a very long ride and know I will run out of water I'll stash a gallon water jug (Or the beer) along the trail where I think I'll need it most. I do this alot when I plan on shuttle rides in Sedona or wherever. Don't quit riding in summer because of this, just use this experience and be wiser for the next trip and now you have a story to tell people.
    "Not drinking is the Single Speed World Championships version of doping" -Jacquie Phelan

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  41. #41
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    I typically stash water on the BCT rides because I usually do a out and back ride. Just have to make sure and stash it out far enough. I have run out of water in about the same place. The river came at a good time, we cooled off dousing our heads with water from the river. Like people have mentioned the desert is no joke, but if one is prepared it can be a lot of fun. It is important to hydrate days before a ride, so in the summer I try to drink a lot of water every day. Glad you made it out ok.
    Last edited by cklog; 09-25-2011 at 08:37 PM. Reason: ?

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazelem View Post
    Thanks everyone for the well wishes and advice. As of today (24 hours later), I fortunately don't have any symptoms. However, I think I'll check in with my doctor tommorow just to be on the safe side. Its possible that the symptoms may not manifest until later, as some previous posts have mentioned.

    For those of you that carry so much more water, do you just have a larger Camelback or do you carry extra water in the back pockets of your jersey?
    Giardia symptoms may begin to appear 1-2 weeks after infection.
    Cryptosporidium symptoms may begin to appear anywhere from 2-10 days after infection.

    I carry two bladders in my one Camelback pouch. I guess I have a larger Camelback.

  43. #43
    PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
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    Stashing water is a good idea on the BCT ride. Our ride from Bumble Bee south to Table Mesa got hot very fast and 3 out of 4 us ran out of water about 7 miles from the finish. Thank goodness there was MTBR's at the finish with some extra water.
    Bender to AZDog: I'm not the best person to give advice on not riding!

  44. #44
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    Just did the black canyon trail today for the first time. I was remembering this thread so I took my camelback with 2 extra gatorade bottles with homemade electrolyte drinks in them just to make sure I would have enough to drink. I wanted to do the 23 mile out-n-back but I fell short because I was running low on water. Thank God I decided to return cause I ran out of water on the climb after the river on the way to the car. Fun trail though. Its not that fun though when your really tired and your riding the sketchy skinny singletrack downhill and theres just like 1 foot of rocky loose singletrack and a cliff..... that would be a long drop down if you slip. 18 miles out of a 23 mile ride is good though with the heat.
    Only type of shuttle I ride....the ambulance!

  45. #45
    DFL>DNF>DNS
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    To follow up on Raybum's plan of action:

    Shorter summer rides I use my 100oz Camelback + bottle (frozen) of whatever electrolyte drink you desire.

    On the longer rides I break out my larger pack, an Osprey Talon that will hold 2 100oz bladders + half a pantry of food. I'll also bring my bottle in the cage + an extra serving or two of my electrolyte drink.

    I too ran into trouble my first time out on the BCT riding solo. On that day I decided to call it quits at Table Mesa Rd. and not risk the ride back to EH with only about 2" on warm water left and temps already climbing into the mid-90's. So I hitch-hiked back to the car. Like others have stated, glad you're here telling your tale.
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  46. #46
    Keep it Simple Stupid!!!
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    After reading this post

    I desided to get an Extra Water bottle mount on the single speed frame I'm building. So it would have the 100 oz Camel Back (standard), and 3 bottles on a ride like BCT. I've never done BCT however the 100oz goes fast on T100 these days. I just started riding it Again
    SF
    Who cares how much gas you save, ride your bike to work because it's fun!!!!!!!

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Freak View Post
    I desided to get an Extra Water bottle mount on the single speed frame I'm building. So it would have the 100 oz Camel Back (standard), and 3 bottles on a ride like BCT. I've never done BCT however the 100oz goes fast on T100 these days. I just started riding it Again
    SF
    The downside to running water bottles only is that they get hot fast, even if you started with them as solid ice they melt quick and become hot to drink unless you have the insulated ones and even then it's only a matter of time, drink these first then out of the blatter. Blatters will hold ice longer and it's much easier to drink cooler water. but extra is always better even warm.
    "Not drinking is the Single Speed World Championships version of doping" -Jacquie Phelan

    E-bikes are Mountain Mopeds

  48. #48
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    I stash significant amounts of water out there as well, Please feel free to use in an emergency, Usually near the tops of climbs, not too hard to find. Usually 4 bottles at the rock bridge under the big rocks. Unless, my "FRIEND" has found them and pee'd in them

    ???????

    Steve
    Drinkin the S-Works Kool-aid

  49. #49
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    One 100oz Camelpack and two 20oz water bottles on the bike. Fill the water bottles with electrolyte of your choice. I like the Zym tabs, but any of them will work. I'm surprised you did not cramp first. I pack a couple extra elecrolyte tabs, just in case. Good Luck

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by azokie View Post
    One 100oz Camelpack and two 20oz water bottles on the bike. Fill the water bottles with electrolyte of your choice. I like the Zym tabs, but any of them will work. I'm surprised you did not cramp first. I pack a couple extra elecrolyte tabs, just in case. Good Luck
    I've found that if you are eating decent foods, electrolytes are not a huge issue. If you've decided to eat very specialized foods (just a sugar source, etc) or none at all relative to your water intake, thats when it can be a problem. Many people don't really eat as often as they should on rides. If you are burning through 100oz/hr, you are going to need more food than normal too.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  51. #51
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    My friend, I think you just used up 7 or 8 of your nine lives. Smartest thing you did, in my opinion, is slipping into the river and reducing your body temp. Heat stroke ain't nothing to be messing with and it can be somewhat capricious in when it decides to strike us. I was riding with friends last week, in conditions I had ridden successfully many times before, when whammo, headache sick to my stomach, extreme fatigue. Fortunately, I had water and the way back was nearly all downhill. My partners insisted on escorting me back to my truck just to be safe, and although the trip back was uneventful, their concern was much appreciated.
    Without heroes, we are all plain people, and don't know how far we can go. Bernard Malamud

  52. #52
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    Glad that you made it out okay (?) and thanks for sharing. Always helpful for everyone me thinks. I've been in a couple close call situations but not quite like that. I'm living in higher elevations and don't ride much down south during the summer months...everyone seems to visit me from the Valley, which is cool (pardon pun). I carry the typical 100oz and 24oz bottle on longer rides but I also bring an emergency whistle and a SPOT emergency locator (which my wife is happy about). I haven't had to use it yet for an emergency (knock knock) but the track feature allows my family and friends to keep tabs on me. Don't know what the turn around time is for the 911 feature is but it's always nice to know that it is available if things get really bad. IMO it is WAY worth the yearly fee and, since I often go solo, my family likes that I carry it... turned on!

  53. #53
    My other ride is your mom
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    I'm a fairly resilient guy in the heat...but occasionally, I get wacked by the heat. The last time this happened, I was doing a triple bypass and on the back side of the McD's, just lost it. I HAB'd up prospector and Bell....and was still huffing and puffing on the HAB. Stopped sweating, started having weird thoughts, irrational discussions, etc.

    In general, I prefer taking a water filter with me rather than more water....the weight penalty of going long down low in the summer with the right amount of water is too much for me. I figure I save some energy by using planned water stops and the filter than carrying around enough water to cross the desert.

    Or better yet....head north my friend when the temps get above 105. Glad you made it out....this experience will make you far wiser.




  54. #54
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    Water filters only work if there is water to filter.

  55. #55
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    Thanks again everyone for the well-wishes. I just ordered my new 100 oz. Camelback, which also has plenty of room for extra water bottles/tablets/etc. I will have plenty of water, and be much better prepared, the next time I venture out. It will obviously be a heavier pack, but that seems a rather small price to pay in light of last Saturday's experience. As far as drinking water from the Agua Fria River, the doctor told me to come in when I start having symptoms - which I fortunately haven't had so far. Maybe the Arizona desert just wanted to teach me to show some respect for it, huh? Point taken.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I've found that if you are eating decent foods, electrolytes are not a huge issue. If you've decided to eat very specialized foods (just a sugar source, etc) or none at all relative to your water intake, thats when it can be a problem. Many people don't really eat as often as they should on rides. If you are burning through 100oz/hr, you are going to need more food than normal too.
    Everybody’s body is different. Some of us are young. Some of us are not so young. Some don’t need very much water when they ride, some need gallons, some need electrolytes, and some need food or any combination. But the OP had his/her issue on the BCT. Riding the overly sun baked, no shade, hellish triple digit heat and humidity of the Phoenix area desert on a weekly basis is an entirely different animal than riding the shaded mild temps of the Prescott area. Even with all the hills we got.

    Dash
    Clearer-er of Prescott trails. Downhill downfall in your way? PM me. Have ax, will travel.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by DashRiprock™®© View Post
    Everybody’s body is different. Some of us are young. Some of us are not so young. Some don’t need very much water when they ride, some need gallons, some need electrolytes, and some need food or any combination. But the OP had his/her issue on the BCT. Riding the overly sun baked, no shade, hellish triple digit heat and humidity of the Phoenix area desert on a weekly basis is an entirely different animal than riding the shaded mild temps of the Prescott area. Even with all the hills we got.

    Dash
    I don't always ride in the "shaded mild" temps, and that's the point. It seems like quite a few PHX posters (not the OP) contributing think of summertime rides in these conditions as "the same as any other ride", and that you just have to "top off your camelback". While a few may say to "bring an extra water bottle", much of the preperation seems woefully inadequate based on the conditions. Almost as if some people don't take it seriously. I was trying to emphasize the importance of more than just water and salt tablets, but the bigger point is proper preperation, thankfully later on there have been some better suggestions.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  58. #58
    The PNF Ax Man.
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    Thankfully those who live and ride in Phoenix know first-hand to advise to bring something more than just water. And not just go with advice from someone who rides a hundred miles away, in a totally different climate and says "eat something."

    Dash
    Clearer-er of Prescott trails. Downhill downfall in your way? PM me. Have ax, will travel.

  59. #59
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    Read an article in Tail Winds (Tucson bicycle magazine) on hikers who regularly drink out of streams without filtering or treating the water. The article was basically about how overhyped it is in the US on giardia, it being less prevalent than suggested by media hype. Some of the inverviewed had drank hundreds of times over many years yet few had ever had symptoms, when the water is clear. Still, I'd boil or treat water with iodine if possible. And a tea bag just for class!
    agmtb

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by DashRiprock™®© View Post
    Thankfully those who live and ride in Phoenix know first-hand to advise to bring something more than just water. And not just go with advice from someone who rides a hundred miles away, in a totally different climate and says "eat something."

    Dash
    Well, then there's the complacency of riding in the early morning and surrounded by a city.

    Before you spout off about what you think you know, I've been in well over 100 degree temps and high humidity in full chemical gear trying to just stay alive by drinking enough water, and it's not easy keeping your core temp regulated in those conditions. It's not fun, not even close.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  61. #61
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    Pulled a similar move out at P&D back in July.. dumb move on my part. It happens once and you wont EVER do it again!

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Before you spout off.
    Funny I was thinking the same thing about you regarding your advice, which is about you and where you live and ride (Prescott) when the topic at hand is about riding in plus 100 degrees in the BCT desert. I live in both Prescott and Glendale by the way. To state the obvious, riding in Prescott the majority of the time vs riding in the Phoenix heat the majority of the time is hardly the same thing. So for you to simply say, "eh, people need to eat more food like I do," is spouting off.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    I've found that if you are eating decent foods, electrolytes are not a huge issue. If you've decided to eat very specialized foods (just a sugar source, etc) or none at all relative to your water intake, thats when it can be a problem. Many people don't really eat as often as they should on rides. If you are burning through 100oz/hr, you are going to need more food than normal too.
    Dash
    Clearer-er of Prescott trails. Downhill downfall in your way? PM me. Have ax, will travel.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by DashRiprock™®© View Post
    Funny I was thinking the same thing about you regarding your advice, which is about you and where you live and ride (Prescott)



    Dash
    Why do you assume this? Is there some sort of rule that i can't leave prescott?
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  64. #64
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    court order

  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by abegold View Post
    Read an article in Tail Winds (Tucson bicycle magazine) on hikers who regularly drink out of streams without filtering or treating the water. The article was basically about how overhyped it is in the US on giardia, it being less prevalent than suggested by media hype. Some of the inverviewed had drank hundreds of times over many years yet few had ever had symptoms, when the water is clear. Still, I'd boil or treat water with iodine if possible. And a tea bag just for class!
    Yah... they never drank outa the sh_t and piss infested loogie pools that exist on the BCT during the summer. Drinking from something with even the slightest flow is no comparison to what is basically a cattle pond. Tuscon has a number of perenial creeks around Mt Lemon that would offer prestine drinking water compared to what this guy just drank.
    Obviously he has come through clean. But you wouldn't take your chances if there were better or more prepared options.

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