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  1. #1
    Meatbomb
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    How often to ride to build endurance ?

    I've been trying to ride everyday to build my skills,endurance, speed etc.. in hope that some day I can keep up with the ladies around here and join some group rides

    Question- is it better to ride every day or should I be giving the leg muscles a down day to recuperate?

    Maybe alternate between speed one day and climbing the next ?


    on a side note, i've lost 17lbs this spring so my speed has naturally gotten faster

  2. #2
    JohnniO
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    Ride as often as possible.
    Lookup Joel Friel's Training Bible.
    To work on endurance, long slow rides. Several hours.
    To build speed ride fast.

    Generally you should stick to the long slow rides for a period of time like a month or two and then cycle periods of speed work after you've built up your endurance.

    Less Scientific method
    Or you could simply just ride all the time at whatever pace you want and if you are riding more then before you'll get faster and stronger.

  3. #3
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    For me, endurance is about being strong enough to do the anerobic bits that are part of mountain biking. This means that the better you can deal with these "sprints" and the faster you can recover, the longer you can ride. It's when you have these short small efforts and you are operating beyond your limit that you "bonk" and then are "done". I think this is somewhat contrary to conventional thought, but I think it is exactly what makes mountain biking different from many sports, at least where we ride in the "hills". It's not all aerobic, it's not all anerobic, but you have to be able to do both pretty well. If your anerobic level is too low, the steep climbs will kill you and take a toll on you fast. One might "think" that they have poor endurance because they can't ride for more than a few hours, but that's not necessarily because their aerobic endurance is poor.

    For aerobic efforts, sure we need a decent amount of fitness, but I find it to be more about keeping gluecose levels up during the ride and starting off with a good base of food/energy before the ride.

    So my advice would be strength training mostly. You can do it on the bike or off, but either way it won't be easy/feel good
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    I've been trying to ride everyday to build my skills,endurance, speed etc.. in hope that some day I can keep up with the ladies around here and join some group rides

    Question- is it better to ride every day or should I be giving the leg muscles a down day to recuperate?

    Maybe alternate between speed one day and climbing the next ?


    on a side note, i've lost 17lbs this spring so my speed has naturally gotten faster
    You're not going to want to hear this, but the best way to build up endurance is to road ride. I, personally, don't road ride, and I know for a fact my endurance has suffered.

    If road riding is not an option, I think the best approach is to work in longer rides as you can. Many who "train" typically do shorter rides in the week (mostly because of time constraints) and longer rides on the weekends.

    You definitely want some rest days, and interval training is a good way to work different muscle groups.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  5. #5
    meow
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    There are specific training programs that incorporate different types of intervals, long STEADY rides (as opposed to long slow rides), strength training, and rest. In order for your muscles to get the benefits you have to work them hard and then let them recover. Days off the bike should include core workouts, and strength training (yoga does both at once). You can ride 4-5 days a week and make great progress. Here's a good basic plan to start:
    http://www.bicycling.com/article/0,6...1641-1,00.html. There are some good core/strength workouts on the site too.

    And congrats on dropping the weight!

  6. #6
    JohnniO
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    I second the road rides.

    And don't be a hardcore dieter. Eat enough so you have enough energy to ride long. If you ride enough, the weight will take care of itself. If you eat enough you will recover quicker and your metabolism will speed up.
    Last edited by JohnniO; 08-19-2010 at 10:17 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    For me, endurance is about being strong enough to do the anerobic bits that are part of mountain biking. This means that the better you can deal with these "sprints" and the faster you can recover, the longer you can ride. It's when you have these short small efforts and you are operating beyond your limit that you "bonk" and then are "done". I think this is somewhat contrary to conventional thought, but I think it is exactly what makes mountain biking different from many sports, at least where we ride in the "hills". It's not all aerobic, it's not all anerobic, but you have to be able to do both pretty well. If your anerobic level is too low, the steep climbs will kill you and take a toll on you fast. One might "think" that they have poor endurance because they can't ride for more than a few hours, but that's not necessarily because their aerobic endurance is poor.

    For aerobic efforts, sure we need a decent amount of fitness, but I find it to be more about keeping glucose levels up during the ride and starting off with a good base of food/energy before the ride.

    So my advice would be strength training mostly. You can do it on the bike or off, but either way it won't be easy/feel good

    Jayem has pretty much covered all of it. Lots of riding, lots of hurting on extended steep climbs, and pushing yourself beyond your comfort zone in training. 5 minute wind sprints hurt like hell, but they generate results. Proper nutrition is very important also, as well as getting your weight and fat to muscle ratio down. It's a lifestyle. Some take their racing seriously, some race for fun, some just want to go mtn bike riding. Take your pick.

    I'm happiest when riding 4 or 5 x a week. The weight comes off, the strength and ease of climbing comes back, as does the speed. Your body adapts on an as needed basis.

    Something I was taught very early riding with some endurance riders is that your PreRide dinner needs to be balanced, but loaded with carbohydrates and some protein. Most that I know that are into endurance flat out load up on a Pasta dinner in large quantities before the ride. That carbo loading will provide the fuel/energy to get them through the first 2 or 3 hours of the ride. Beyond that... it's a whole other level of putting in calories as fast as they are being burned off, else you lose/eat up fat, and you start eating up your own muscles to make energy for the ride. You have to do the long rides for your body to learn how to digest the fat/muscle in training. I've also heard that you should train doing rides that are 65 to 80% of the same length of a big event you are doing, before tapering off. There are lots of theories, you need to experiment to see what works best for you.
    Last edited by Boyonabyke; 05-18-2010 at 10:29 AM.

  8. #8
    My other ride is your mom
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    I started riding longer rides last summer. Prior to May of last year, I had not ridden more than 30 miles on a ride with my average mileage/week being in the 60 mile range. Setting my sights on a ~90mile ride in August, I started with the 30 mile ride I had done, and repeated it. I then, on a two week interval, cranked up the miles in 10 mile increments. Each successive ride, gave me the opportunity to stretch a bit outside of my comfort zone, learning lessons about nutrition, hydration and my bodies breaking point each time....but in an incremental and conservative approach. Each time I rode longer, I would take a very conservative approach with the goal to just finish the ride.

    By the time the 90 mile ride came around, I was very comfortable where I was at and was not mentally worked over the prospect of cranking out 75 mile rides whenever I wanted to. My nutrition, hydration and expectations as to what my body could do and what I could demand of my body were dialed.

    In between these successively longer rides, I would do a ride, every other day in the 15 mile range.....with roughly 1500ft/vert. I'm lucky that I live close to a loop that offers this, because as Jayem says above....you have to be able to do the anerobic bits of the longer rides. This is what I focused on for these shorter rides....which offered me to push myself beyond my abilities without being "hell and gone from Cartagena". In otherwords, I would ride this loop fast and hard until I felt like puking. This undoubtedly increased my anarobic ability on the longer rides.

    Lastly, on the off weekend in between the rides in which I was increasing my mileage by 10 miles from the previous; I would do a ride, half the length of the previous weekend....but this time, I would not ride it as conservatively as my endurance pace. I would focus on pushing myself up hills a bit above what I considered my endurance pace. In essence, I was incorporating and "trying out/testing" individual sprints within an overall endurance framework.

    This worked well for me because it allowed me to successively build on each previous weeks achievements in a structured, incremental fashion. It's probably not for everyone, and may be a bit conservative due to my need to preserve my IT band in my knee; but hopefully it gives some others an idea of how to sneak up on some of the longer rides out there.

    Ironically, I find myself having to do this all over again this late-spring/ early summer because I slacked off on this approach, had no maintenance plan for the winter....and unfortunately, my rabid backcountry skiing habit did not do anything to preserve my knee for riding long distances. It maintained my cardio for sure, but I'm now back to the 50-60 mile ride range for the next two weeks until I can bump it up another 10 miles.....




  9. #9
    aka Diesel
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    When I take more than one day off from either riding or running, my body lets me know it; I actually LOSE strength and endurance, versus gaining energy from "recovering". I think I may be in a tiny percentile of people whose bodies respond in such a way.

    But seriously- 3-4 days off, and I come back compromised.
    A week off, be it vacation or illness, and I'm sunk. It's like starting ALL over again.

    That said, if I hit it too hard, I'm no good across the board. I'll be exhausted while running or riding.

    My suggestion? Everybody responds differently, so try out different things and see what YOUR body tells you.

    And ps- you don't have to keep up with the ladies! We LIKE beating the boys!
    "People do not lack strength; they lack will" (Victor Hugo)

  10. #10
    PMP,TAN,LAUNDRY
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    Pedal 50+lbs Karpiels on trail rides like Kavurider.
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  11. #11
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
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    i take half the year off,, getting back into it is a bit hard but once you get all that lung butter hocked up and out, you recover quickly. such is the life of a workaholic...

  12. #12
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    1 big ride (8-16 hours) a week and commute to work regularly, add in a weekly ride (for me it's Tuesday) and you have a recipe for endurance success. Mondays are my rest days, I drive to work and do nothing (after the big weekend ride). My commute is about 45 minutes one way, it is like cheater miles. On Tuesdays, I ride to work, do a group ride, and ride home, 4-5 hours of riding.

    Instead of "training" you need to find the love of steep, technical climbing. Those will be your sprint workouts and you will grow to love them. Road riding sucks, I only do it on the commute to work about once a week. Other days, I am taking dirt back roads on my way to work.

    I hate training and just head out to ride for the sake of riding. If I did interval training, I would lose the love of riding.

    I also try to trail run about once a week since I have a trail 200 yards from my classroom.

  13. #13
    Need more cowbell
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    Great thread.....I'm taking lots of notes.....

  14. #14
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    This is a great question. I am also new to riding. It took my wife 5 years to convince me to get bikes lol. My first ride on a mtb at the local trek demo was hard but alot of fun. We left the demo that day and bought our bikes. We have been riding for 6 weeks or so now and getting better and better.

    We also bought some road bikes and have been riding those 3 days a week. This last sunday we did a 26 mile ride. There is a huge increase in performance that i see in myself on my mtb. The road riding is getting my endurance up without question.

    I like mtb alot more but we cannot go do that everyday so that is why we got the road bikes.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by azepicriderandrunner
    1 big ride (8-16 hours) a week and commute to work regularly, add in a weekly ride (for me it's Tuesday) and you have a recipe for endurance success. Mondays are my rest days, I drive to work and do nothing (after the big weekend ride). My commute is about 45 minutes one way, it is like cheater miles. On Tuesdays, I ride to work, do a group ride, and ride home, 4-5 hours of riding.

    Instead of "training" you need to find the love of steep, technical climbing. Those will be your sprint workouts and you will grow to love them. Road riding sucks, I only do it on the commute to work about once a week. Other days, I am taking dirt back roads on my way to work.

    I hate training and just head out to ride for the sake of riding. If I did interval training, I would lose the love of riding.

    I also try to trail run about once a week since I have a trail 200 yards from my classroom.
    That's the key in my opinion.
    Just keep doing it. Climb as much as you can.
    Just riding "flat" loops at half intensity does nothing for endurance.

  16. #16
    JohnniO
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    Quote Originally Posted by KavuRider
    Just riding "flat" loops at half intensity does nothing for endurance.
    Not to get all scientific and geek on you but you're kidding right ? Endurance training is riding Zone 2 for long rides until you build a base and then followed by higher intensity training.

  17. #17
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    I take a different approach than most here... I just ride for fun when I feel like it. Not really any structure around it, just ride when I feel like it.

    I think everyone has mentioned this above... but I will reiterate VERY important lessons I have learned...

    If you want to be able to ride longer, do longer rides. If you want to go faster, do shorter, high intensity rides. Make sure that you take recovery days - VERY VERY VERY important. If you do a super hard effort one day, make sure that you either take the next day off or ride at an easy pace that you can comfortably maintain and talk to everyone around you (active recovery).

    Consistency is key - not consistently the same rides, mix those up... but do not take a month off and then expect to come back fast. If you ride 4-5X per week, one long ride, one short fast ride, and other recovery rides, you will get faster and be able to go longer.

    The road bike suggestion is a really really good one. It is super fun to get into some of the groups in the valley and try to hang on as long as possible. That will build speed and endurance faster than anything - and you will meet lots of cool people (all roadies are not bad, just most of them)

    Another thing that helps is group mtn bike rides with people that are faster than you. Try to keep up with the group as long as possible - do this on trails that you know so if you do get dropped you can get home. But the problem with most of the mtb group rides is you ride for 5 min, wait for 10 minutes and talk and stuff, ride for 5 minutes, wait for 10 minutes, fix a flat, broken chain, talk to everyone about the awesome crash/etc. It is important to find a group that rides steadily and has same ride goals as you.

    Lot of fun to get faster - it actually makes the rides WAAAY more enjoyable when you do not think you are going to die in the first 45 minutes...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnniO
    Not to get all scientific and geek on you but you're kidding right ? Endurance training is riding Zone 2 for long rides until you build a base and then followed by higher intensity training.
    You're full of crap. Riding a road bike does NOTHING for mountain bike endurance. Road riding is ghey and so is lycra when it's 115 outside. Baggy shorts FTW!

  19. #19
    JohnniO
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    Quote Originally Posted by RogerDoger
    You're full of crap. Riding a road bike does NOTHING for mountain bike endurance. Road riding is ghey and so is lycra when it's 115 outside. Baggy shorts FTW!
    Too bad your rear hub is messed up you'll have to ride road all weekend. Did you do RAAM in baggies ?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnniO
    Not to get all scientific and geek on you but you're kidding right ? Endurance training is riding Zone 2 for long rides until you build a base and then followed by higher intensity training.
    No, I'm not kidding.

    I just go out and pedal. And pedal. And pedal some more. Until it hurts. Then keep pedaling. Then come home and eat a burrito. Works for me. That has been my "training plan" for Flight of the Pigs for the last 3 years. Finished every time.

    I don't get paid, therefore I don't "train". I don't have the discipline to adhere to a set training plan anyways.

    I've noticed that most people who claim they don't have endurance tend to just do short rides at low intensity, with minimal climbing.

  21. #21
    JohnniO
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    Quote Originally Posted by KavuRider

    I've noticed that most people who claim they don't have endurance tend to just do short rides at low intensity, with minimal climbing.
    That's because your supposed to do LONG rides at low insensity for endurance.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnniO
    That's because your supposed to do LONG rides at low insensity for endurance.
    Ok, tell them that.

    I just like to climb.

  23. #23
    parenting for gnarness
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    the single most important thing is that you are having fun. There are so many combinations for training that for starters just workout, mix it up, do stuff on your off days, and HAVE FUN!

    I used to be a sprinter (like, on my feet...) and my technical burst was stronger than it is now, but I crapped out at about 2 hrs. Now i can go for hrs at pace, but I think I'm slower. I really dont care - I have fun and am capable and in shape. Anything you push yourself on - flat speed, climbs, etc - is going to give you that burn and lead to improvements. Once you get your overall fitness up, if you want to continue towards goals you can get more specific.

    FWIW, I've been climbing the McDs every week now, at a steady social pace, and weekly I am getting further up the mtn before i dab.
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  24. #24
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    Marlboro Reds

  25. #25
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    Running, hiking, and leg lunges/squats help too!
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  26. #26
    JohnniO
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    I've trained a lot in the past and just having fun riding got me to a certain point. After a while when I hit a plateau I had to get more specific as far as far as distances, paces, heart rates , etc.

    It may not be to most people but to me this was fun. I actually love intervals , on the road bike or the mountain bike.

    To each his own.

  27. #27
    parenting for gnarness
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnniO
    I've trained a lot in the past and just having fun riding got me to a certain point. After a while when I hit a plateau I had to get more specific as far as far as distances, paces, heart rates , etc.

    It may not be to most people but to me this was fun. I actually love intervals , on the road bike or the mountain bike.

    To each his own.
    i think you are absolutely right that without some specific targets, you will plateau eventually. Its a balance between your fitness, your progress, and the amount of structure you want to add. but just having fun and wanting to be on your bike is the first step, imo.
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  28. #28
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    So can someone tell me if it's an eating issue or hydration issue that I end up with a headache after a ride? The last three high intensity rides I've done have resulted in a headache about an hour after the ride. I drink lots of water before and during my ride but usually eat very little before the ride (150-200 calories).

    My goal is to lose weight so I don't want to take in too much before I ride so that I burn more calories and fat during the ride. So, if someone like me who isn't going to race, but wants to first, lose weight, second get fit, do I need to eat more before I ride? I ride because I like it. The fit part just comes with it. That's how I tend to look at it.

  29. #29
    "No Clue Crew"
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    This is the training program I just started to get me ready for 12 hour events.
    *EVERY 4TH WEEK IS A REST WEEK*

    Monday- REST DAY FOR RIDING
    4:30 A.M.- Weight Training

    Tuesday- 1hr (normal-hard)
    4:15 A.M.- Desert Classic or indoor trainer

    Wednesday- 1hr (normal-hard)
    6:00 P.M. - Desert Classic
    4:30 A.M.- Weight Training

    Thursday- - 1hr (very intense - high power intervals or hills, etc.)
    4:15 A.M. - Javelina or Widowmaker

    Friday- 1hr (normal-hard)
    5:30 P.M.- Desert Classic or indoor trainer
    4:15 A.M.- Weight Training

    Saturday- 3hr (longer, easy spin)
    A.M. Canal or Road

    Sunday- 4-6hrs (hard and long)
    A.M. All out, long ride. Desert Classic, Pemberton, T100, etc.


    I will let you know how it goes over the next few months.

  30. #30
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunerinaz
    So can someone tell me if it's an eating issue or hydration issue that I end up with a headache after a ride? The last three high intensity rides I've done have resulted in a headache about an hour after the ride. I drink lots of water before and during my ride but usually eat very little before the ride (150-200 calories).

    My goal is to lose weight so I don't want to take in too much before I ride so that I burn more calories and fat during the ride. So, if someone like me who isn't going to race, but wants to first, lose weight, second get fit, do I need to eat more before I ride? I ride because I like it. The fit part just comes with it. That's how I tend to look at it.
    Well, what do you eat after the ride? You have max of 30 min to 1hr to get food down, and otherwise you don't benefit all that much from the exercise and your body doesn't repair itself all that much (so you end up more fatigued the next day).

    Otherwise, you need a good base of carbs before the ride, and you need to eat them long enough before that they are digesting and entering your blood as usable energy. This means correct food and timing. If you don't eat enough, you are going to bonk and not perform as well as possible. I'd say it's your eating habits outside of riding that you need to control better (many of us do, like myself).
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  31. #31
    Meatbomb
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    great info guys - Thanks !!

    I'm not looking to do 12 hour type rides but want to be able to climb Taliesin to Quartz without having to stop for a short break along the way... that's my current goal and I am about 3/4 of the way there. Once I get that nailed then i plan to focus on climbing Lost Dog non stop (there is one steep section that gets me every time).

    I have a great time riding even if I have to take a break on occasion.

  32. #32
    Meatbomb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    You have max of 30 min to 1hr to get food down, a
    Does Fosters count

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    great info guys - Thanks !!

    I have a great time riding even if I have to take a break on occasion.

    That's the important part. The endurance will come

  34. #34
    My other ride is your mom
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    Fosters (or Arrogant Bastard) does count....and even has a modest amount of protein to go with those carbs. A better combo would be a Fosters (or Arrogant Bastard) and some form of protein....preferably something in the format of a burrito.




  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunerinaz
    So can someone tell me if it's an eating issue or hydration issue that I end up with a headache after a ride? The last three high intensity rides I've done have resulted in a headache about an hour after the ride. I drink lots of water before and during my ride but usually eat very little before the ride (150-200 calories).

    My goal is to lose weight so I don't want to take in too much before I ride so that I burn more calories and fat during the ride. So, if someone like me who isn't going to race, but wants to first, lose weight, second get fit, do I need to eat more before I ride? I ride because I like it. The fit part just comes with it. That's how I tend to look at it.

    Headaches can be signs of low blood sugar, or more frequently, dehydration. It's all about keeping your engine in balance. You need carbs, some protein the night before, to "fill up your tank" for a big ride the next day. Then you need to maintain filling your tank, not letting it run on "empty" after about 2 or 3 hours of riding, with water, 2 types of salt, sodium based and potassium based, in the proper balance, during and after the ride, to avoid cramps. You need to input the right type of easily availabe "gas" or food blocks, during the ride, and then you need to replenish anything you wiped out and got out of balance after the ride.

    For example, I run and eat dill pickle spears, immediately after a big ride, to get my potassium up and avoid cramps. Some folks have had good luck with mustard packages for hotdogs during long rides. Others use Cytomax for shorter rides to about 4 hours, it's missing protein. Accelerade has the protein, but to me, it tastes like sh*t, and makes me flatulate in a bad way for the riders behind me. Your body is a pump or a motor... you put food and other stuff in it, and it all comes out of you in the form of energy for your muscles, sweat, salt, pee and poop. Gotta feed the motor and check the oil, radiator and fuel tank for leaks, on every ride, beginning, during and after, if you want it to work and function right.

  36. #36
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    Jayem and Randyboy, thanks for the info. I guess one problem is I don't usually eat right after a ride. I usually ride early in the morning and then wait for lunch to eat anything. I'm not looking for the ultimate fitness program but it's nice to know some do's and don'ts.

  37. #37
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    [quote=azepicriderandrunner]
    I hate training and just head out to ride for the sake of riding. If I did interval training, I would lose the love of riding.
    quote]

    +10000
    If it ain't fun, what's the f'ing point.

    Also, Deanna was right on about everyone being different. She (and my wife) doesn't need rest days. I need at least 2 a week. Everyone is different, you have to find out what works for you.

    One thing that WILL make you strong is getting, and riding, a singlespeed. Most of my friends have actually found that they enjoy it - so that goes back to the having fun part.

    In the end, just ride as much as you can and enjoy the awesome weather and scenery that are available here.

    Oh yeah, and come on out to an AES (http://rockyroad5050.wordpress.com/) event.

  38. #38
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    seriously though, listening to over-analyzing of biking is about as interesting as people discussing chess moves... if you're strategizing how to spend 40 hours a week training, i hope you're getting paid for it...

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike
    seriously though, listening to over-analyzing of biking is about as interesting as people discussing chess moves... if you're strategizing how to spend 40 hours a week training, i hope you're getting paid for it...
    I would train 40 hours a week for zero dollars if someone would pay my bills for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dunerinaz
    Jayem and Randyboy, thanks for the info. I guess one problem is I don't usually eat right after a ride. I usually ride early in the morning and then wait for lunch to eat anything. I'm not looking for the ultimate fitness program but it's nice to know some do's and don'ts.
    A couple of quick solutions. Eat a cups worth of trail mix(nuts, dried fruits and M&M chocolates, the green ones make you....) after half of your 1 to 2 hour ride is completed. Another option is pack 2 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches in your pack, one at 1/2 time, the other at the end of the ride. Even better.... if you ride mornings, get a breakfast burrito that's got eggs, potatos or hash browns and beans in it, both very high in protein, right after the ride.
    For me, soda is the worst crap I can put into myself, during or after a ride. Sugar high followed by sugar crash.

    If I'm really really whupped after a good climb on a weekday of 2 to 4000 vertical feet, I make a large glass of chocolate milk first thing when I get home. Very good at stopping the zombie bonk feeling I can get from a very hard spirited workout ride.

    These are things that have worked for me, YMMV, try it and see if it helps you. Weekends and social long rides... yeah, spring for the Stones IPA of sorts.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike
    seriously though, listening to over-analyzing of biking is about as interesting as people discussing chess moves... if you're strategizing how to spend 40 hours a week training, i hope you're getting paid for it...

    More like about 13 hours a week and I don't need to get paid for it. It is something I really enjoy and I want to continue to get better at it. I HATE being too tired to make it up a hill or keep up with a group. I want to ensure that I do well in my first 12 hour event. If you see that as over-analyzing, so be it. If you don't find it interesting, then get off the thread. HOW OFTEN TO RIDE TO BUILD ENDURANCE ? is the name of the thread.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyBoy
    For me, soda is the worst crap I can put into myself, during or after a ride. Sugar high followed by sugar crash .
    Yep, same here. I can't do soda anymore, except on exceptionally rare occasions, and even then I can't even finish it. The sugar is just way too much. I can't even drink store-bought gatorade anymore either, the corn syrup is just too much and I notice a significant performance decrease when I use that stuff. These changes make a huge difference IMO in your ability to perform. It's like removing a whole lot of sludge and cleaning out your "engine", allowing it to perform better.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  43. #43
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    I can't get to a mountain often enough, and I'm scared shztless of road riding. I commute on a motorcycle, and know how drivers drive, but on a motorbike, I feel like I have a fighting chance with the quick acceleration, rearview mirrors, fullface helmet, armored gear, etc. I know, I'm kidding myself, but that's my risk management threshold.

    So anyway, I've been trying to run to improve endurance. Mind you, I'm pushing 40, not heavy but in terrible shape, and haven't run since high school, so it was humbling to attempt running a mile and barely get halfway before having to walk. My wife is my inspiration - a 20 year smoker who quit 3 years ago and picked up running, then road-riding, then triathlon-ing (that's a word), now mountain biking. Over the past couple weeks, I've worked my way up to 2 miles, and just did 2.5 tonight. I think my legs almost fell off. My right hamstring seems somewhat injured, and I think I was favoring the left leg, which left it burning and my left knee (my good one) let me know how much it hates me. I hate running. Hate it. But if it gets me to where I can keep up with my wife going uphill on a mountain bike, it has to be done.

  44. #44
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    Good job! Outstanding Thread

    All good points here, I think the most important thing is consistency. The Endurance and ability to climb well comes with time. The body is an Amazing machine and it's ability to Adapt is incredible. I'd like to add getting a good nights sleep to the above recommendations and staying away from Booze and recreational drugs.

    You will notice time when you are not making progress, at those times let your good habits carry you through to the next jump in fitness.

    One of the biggest differences in MTB vs Road (I've done both and have more experience on the road) MTB tends to go anaerobic at unpredictable times. Road is more consistent and predicable, you have better traction, no suspension bob and a lighter bike more efficient bike. On the road wind resistance and drafting are much bigger factors, off road drafting and wind resistance and group riding are not a big part of your skill set. Tire pressure, bike setup and trail side repairs are much bigger concerns on MTB.

    Once Again great thread
    SF
    Who cares how much gas you save, ride your bike to work because it's fun!!!!!!!

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steel Freak
    I'd like to add getting a good nights sleep to the above recommendations and staying away from Booze
    BULLCRAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    BULLCRAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    can you just stay out of one freaking thread? Don't you have 24hop weather to blog about?

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    can you just stay out of one freaking thread? Don't you have 24hop weather to blog about?
    I ride once every 2 weeks whether I need it or not.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by yetisurly
    I ride once every 2 weeks whether I need it or not.

    dreamy draw with jayem doesn't count

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaylonMcFlailin
    My right hamstring seems somewhat injured, and I think I was favoring the left leg, which left it burning and my left knee (my good one) let me know how much it hates me. I hate running. Hate it. But if it gets me to where I can keep up with my wife going uphill on a mountain bike, it has to be done.
    Change your diet first. Restricting your intake is easier than maintaining your intake and working out to burn that excess that you could have more easily avoided. If it hurts, stop, you're doing it incorrectly. There is technique to running, contrary to popular belief. Getting to a mountain can be a pita, so try a spin class. If an hour is too short, then bring an audio book (download online free or at a library as well for free) or your music and stay a little longer. I'm not going to say that road biking is safe, because it's a lot like riding a motorcycle in that it's only a matter of time before it's your turn on the blacktop. Stay off of sidewalks because it confuses auto drivers. Good luck man and post some of your results.
    Last edited by NardoSS; 05-19-2010 at 11:23 AM.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by NardoSS
    Change your diet first. Restricting your intake is easier than maintaining your intake and working out to burn that excess that you could have more easily avoided. If it hurts, stop, you're doing it incorrectly. There is technique to running, contrary to popular belief. Getting to a mountain can be a pita, so try a spin class. If an hour is too short, then bring an audio book (download from XXX for free) or your music and stay a little longer. I'm not going to say that road biking is safe, because it's a lot like riding a motorcycle in that it's only a matter of time before it's your turn on the blacktop. Stay off of sidewalks because it confuses auto drivers. Good luck man and post some of your results.
    Not to be a complete dick, and to change the subject some, but can you remove the above link to the torrent site. I know you might not think there is anything wrong with this, but you're stealing money from both the author and the publisher.

    (Sorry, it's a sore subject with me, as I'm in publishing, and I noticed a lot of our books are on that site.)
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  51. #51
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    Good thread, lots of solid advice. I avoid sugar like the plague, makes you weak and tired......FAST!!!!

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    (Sorry, it's a sore subject with me, as I'm in publishing, and I noticed a lot of our books are on that site.)
    I love this idea. I am downloading all the books right now!

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by azepicriderandrunner
    I love this idea. I am downloading all the books right now!
    I'm sure you'll find the books we publish very intriguing. We're thinking of donating them to the sleep institute.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  54. #54
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    THATS JUST GREAT!!!!!! I go for an awesome ride and come back to see I missed a killer link to some stolen sh!t, books no less......first unemployment, then all the time in the world to ride and ski, now this.....what's a brotha gotta do to catch a break.

    If I were more negative, I would suppose that the brazilian bikini team would come along in their tour bus and ask me if they knew of anyone who would like to be their photo-shoot, lube-boy.




  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    If I were more negative, I would suppose that the brazilian bikini team would come along in their tour bus and ask me if they knew of anyone who would like to be their photo-shoot, lube-boy.
    They were here last week in protest of the Immigration Law.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    Not to be a complete dick, and to change the subject some, but can you remove the above link to the torrent site. I know you might not think there is anything wrong with this, but you're stealing money from both the author and the publisher.

    (Sorry, it's a sore subject with me, as I'm in publishing, and I noticed a lot of our books are on that site.)

    are you serious? so you pay for every piece of music?

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    are you serious? so you pay for every piece of music?
    100%. If you're fine with stealing somebody's body of work and not compensating them, that's your prerogative. I, personally, disagree.

    How do you think musicians and record companies make money? By giving away music?
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire

    How do you think musicians and record companies make money? By giving away music?
    how do you think software companies make money? by building security into their wares.
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  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball
    how do you think software companies make money? by building security into their wares.
    That's really secondary though, isn't it? Software companies make money by selling software. They put money into securing their software because there are a lot of dishonest people out there.

    I'm sure may artists are fine with giving away their wares for free if they know it will lead to greater recognition. I mean, didn't Radiohead release their last album online and had fans set their own price? And many bands have Myspace or webpages where they play entire albums. In fact, NPR streamed the entire Brothers album from the Black Keys last week, in anticipation of the album's May 18th release.

    My point is, just because music (or software, or books, or any other IP) is not secure does not mean you're free to take it without compensating the artist. I know many feel it's okay. I, personally, don't.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    100%. If you're fine with stealing somebody's body of work and not compensating them, that's your prerogative. I, personally, disagree.

    How do you think musicians and record companies make money? By giving away music?

    So every piece of music and software you have is bought and payed for? Microsoft and adobe can afford to give away a few products.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    So every piece of music and software you have is bought and payed for? Microsoft and adobe can afford to give away a few products.
    I thought we were talking about music and books?

    To be blunt, I probably have a CD or two that somebody loaned me, and I'm sure there are books on my bookshelf that I got from a friend. But I, personally, have never gone on any P2P site to download a movie, or album, a piece of software, or whatever. If I like an artist, I will show my appreciation by purchasing their art.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    I thought we were talking about music and books?

    To be blunt, I probably have a CD or two that somebody loaned me, and I'm sure there are books on my bookshelf that I got from a friend. But I, personally, have never gone on any P2P site to download a movie, or album, a piece of software, or whatever. If I like an artist, I will show my appreciation by purchasing their art.

    I thought you published software

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    I thought you published software
    See above. I publish books.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    That's really secondary though, isn't it? Software companies make money by selling software. They put money into securing their software because there are a lot of dishonest people out there.

    I'm sure may artists are fine with giving away their wares for free if they know it will lead to greater recognition. I mean, didn't Radiohead release their last album online and had fans set their own price? And many bands have Myspace or webpages where they play entire albums. In fact, NPR streamed the entire Brothers album from the Black Keys last week, in anticipation of the album's May 18th release.

    My point is, just because music (or software, or books, or any other IP) is not secure does not mean you're free to take it without compensating the artist. I know many feel it's okay. I, personally, don't.
    just effing with you. However, publishers and music companies have enough money at stake that adding security to their wares is in their best interests; they make money by selling their wares. I've gone around in my head on this one many many times. I find it very very hard to see something as stealing when its infinite and no one can show damages as a result of my theft. The counterpoint is that you are not paying for the product (a computer file) but for the performance\ideas in the book. All true...but i just can't get over someone trying to sell something and not bothering to secure it. If you dont forcibly attache value to it, how can you expect anyone else to?

    A long, and somewhat inconclusive, ramble on the subject here:
    http://chollaball.net/blog/2009/06/s...ing-ideas.html
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  65. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    See above. I publish books.

    you said you publish music software

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball
    just effing with you. However, publishers and music companies have enough money at stake that adding security to their wares is in their best interests; they make money by selling their wares. I've gone around in my head on this one many many times. I find it very very hard to see something as stealing when its infinite and no one can show damages as a result of my theft. The counterpoint is that you are not paying for the product (a computer file) but for the performance\ideas in the book. All true...but i just can't get over someone trying to sell something and not bothering to secure it. If you dont forcibly attache value to it, how can you expect anyone else to?

    A long, and somewhat inconclusive, ramble on the subject here:
    http://chollaball.net/blog/2009/06/s...ing-ideas.html
    I'll check that out tonight.

    And I'll agree that the music, publishers, etc. do take some responsibility. But I think first and foremost the person it's hurting is the artists. Yes, to a lesser extent it's taking money away from the record company or publishing house (but we're talking millions of dollars). But in turn, it's making it more and more difficult for up and coming artists to make a living because the big players are only signing sure money makers.

    But, as pointed out above, many bands, both big and small, are finding ways to leverage "free" content. Same can be said for writers, with the popularity of blogs, the internet, self publishing sites, and now the e-book market. There are many more opportunities for them.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by JrockFeltaz
    you said you publish music software
    Yes, you're correct. You caught me.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    I'll check that out tonight.

    And I'll agree that the music, publishers, etc. do take some responsibility. But I think first and foremost the person it's hurting is the artists. Yes, to a lesser extent it's taking money away from the record company or publishing house (but we're talking millions of dollars). But in turn, it's making it more and more difficult for up and coming artists to make a living because the big players are only signing sure money makers.

    But, as pointed out above, many bands, both big and small, are finding ways to leverage "free" content. Same can be said for writers, with the popularity of blogs, the internet, self publishing sites, and now the e-book market. There are many more opportunities for them.
    even if not free, the days of $12 albums or $18 hardcover books are gone. With self-distribution, actual costs go way way down.

    An example - not long ago I ganked a copy of a DVD decryption program. I use the program to copy kids DVDs to my HD for my kids to watch, that I obtain via my Netflix membership. I am not reselling and I paid for initial access to the movie, so the copying I am cool with. The decryption program came wtih all sorts of features I did not want or would use, and was priced about $75 for a year -- above average for that type of small ware. 2 clicks on Google and I had a crack for the program. If it was more like $30, I would have paid for it. I have no idea what the moral is there...
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  69. #69
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    the moral is found in your first paragraph.......the days of $12 albums or $18 hardcover books are gone. Sure.....stealing/downloading hurts the artists....but it also hurts the middle man....the ancient, old paradigm that existed because that was the only way to distribute your music in the past. No longer......the old guard markets music based on image....not on music. The new guard will succeed based purely on their music talents alone....or their performance act via teh interwebs.....




  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer
    the moral is found in your first paragraph.......the days of $12 albums or $18 hardcover books are gone. Sure.....stealing/downloading hurts the artists....but it also hurts the middle man....the ancient, old paradigm that existed because that was the only way to distribute your music in the past. No longer......the old guard markets music based on image....not on music. The new guard will succeed based purely on their music talents alone....or their performance act via teh interwebs.....
    I can tell you that as a Freelance outdoors writer, the internet and having articles published for pay are about gone. Too many post and write here, on Bulletin boards, bored, for free.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by RandyBoy
    I can tell you that as a Freelance outdoors writer, the internet and having articles published for pay are about gone. Too many post and write here, on Bulletin boards, bored, for free.
    yes, but, DrunkCyclist has a huge following and (i'm assuming) has found a way to make money on his visits. Some of our locals like MtBikeAZ or U2MeToo or EpicRider get tons of hits on their sites cause of the stuff they enjoy doing. Not trying to sound snarky by any means, just that the removal of one job has created another.
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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by NardoSS
    Change your diet first. Restricting your intake is easier than maintaining your intake and working out to burn that excess that you could have more easily avoided.
    I don't eat a lot. I probably don't eat the right things all the time, and I probably drink too much beer. Diet is not a problem for me, but nutrition is.

    If it hurts, stop, you're doing it incorrectly.
    WTF?! I thought it was "no pain no gain"? Seriously though, the last quarter mile is when it started getting painful. I'm kind of a puss when it comes to running, and really good at justifying NOT running or STOPPING running, so I thought I'd ignore my superior sensitivity and push through it. I wanted to do 3 miles, but my leg was about to fall off, so I stopped at 2.5.

    There is technique to running, contrary to popular belief.
    Wife coached me on technique, and says my form looks good. She says my shoes are the problem. Which could be true, I bought the cheapest thing that fit from the clearance rack that said "running" on it.

    Good luck man and post some of your results.
    Thanks

  73. #73
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    So, if you wake up, look at your schedule and see your first meeting has been move and if you act fast and get out the door now you can get in an hour ride, what do you try to eat?

    This happened this morning and I ate a banana with peanut butter on it while prepping my gear. Other suggestions?

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    So, if you wake up, look at your schedule and see your first meeting has been move and if you act fast and get out the door now you can get in an hour ride, what do you try to eat?

    This happened this morning and I ate a banana with peanut butter on it while prepping my gear. Other suggestions?
    Nothing, eat the banana with penut butter after the ride. That's the way we did it in the Army, 6am physical training. Eat something reasonable after the exercise, otherwise you won't recover as well/get as much benefit. The banana + peanut butter would be a good recovery though, banana will get glucose back up and peanut butter with have some needed fat and protien.

    With that short of a ride, and being that close to the ride-time, I doubt you'd get much benefit eating anything before, except maybe half of the banana?

    Just my opinion on the subject.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  75. #75
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    Is eating 1-1.5 hrs before the ride long enough to get the benefit of the nutrients on the ride? I rode National this morning and felt better than I have ever felt and that was with eating some oatmeal and a banana about 1.5 hrs before my ride.

    BTW, wasn't this morning beautiful? I got an early start this morning and it was actually kinda chilly when I first left the Pima lot.

  76. #76
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    Most people have enough glucose stored in their living upon waking in the morning to fuel a 2-hour maximum effort. My rule of thumb is that I won't eat anything on a ride that's going to be 2 hours or less, but if I'm going to go over 2 hours I will start eating around 1 1/2 hrs into the ride.

    As for training for endurance, I find that as long as I can do one long-ish ride per week (3 hrs+) my endurance is good for just about any effort in the 3-6 hour range, and I can still eek out a 6-12 hour day in the saddle if forced to.

  77. #77
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    So what I hear you all saying is that I shouldn't fill my Mountain Feedbag with M&M's and Skittles and feed myself a double handful at the top of each climb as a reward? I'm not sure I like this sport anymore.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by dunerinaz
    Is eating 1-1.5 hrs before the ride long enough to get the benefit of the nutrients on the ride? I rode National this morning and felt better than I have ever felt and that was with eating some oatmeal and a banana about 1.5 hrs before my ride.

    BTW, wasn't this morning beautiful? I got an early start this morning and it was actually kinda chilly when I first left the Pima lot.
    Yes, but you are kind of on the edge as far as time is concerned. 1.5-2hrs is usually a bit better. There are a lot of anerobic climbs that I'd want to be prepared for on National, depending on how many of those you can sustain, you could bonk pretty easily out there without enough energy. National would be an exception IMO to what Greg said above, as I tend to agree with what he said. Ideally you eat every 30-45 minutes to keep your glucose up. For a 2hr ride, I don't see it being a big benefit. On a bigger ride, eat at 30 to 45 min in, then repeat every 30-45 min.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whyaduck
    So what I hear you all saying is that I shouldn't fill my Mountain Feedbag with M&M's and Skittles and feed myself a double handful at the top of each climb as a reward? I'm not sure I like this sport anymore.
    Hell no, I use gummy worms sometimes. You just gotta know when it's appropriate to use em and how to keep yourself from bonking. Small bits of food over long time are great, large meals (big sandwitch, even a complete power bar sometimes) are not so great, as you take a lot of blood from your system to digest the food. Power gels/gu get misused just like candy, as it's simply not that far removed, and it's ok for a quick boost, but it's not good long-term energy. Not useless, but you gotta use it right.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  80. #80
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    I like the Sprouts Western Trail Mix..... Peanuts,Almonds, M&M's and Raisins..Plus i add a scoop of Wall nuts as well.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by WaylonMcFlailin
    She says my shoes are the problem. Which could be true, I bought the cheapest thing that fit from the clearance rack that said "running" on it.



    Thanks

    When I started running, I would do the same thing - buy the cheapest running shoes that I thought would do the job. Eventually, I was running with a group, and a friend who was a rep for a shoe company told me that I had the wrong kind of shoes, and suggested what I needed based on what she observed. That was the best thing for my running. My point is that although you may want not want to spend too much money, particularly at the apparently overpriced running specialty stores, that is what you should do if you want to continue running. Especially if you want to avoid injury. Go to Run AZ, Runner's Den, Sole Sports, Roadrunner Sports, or any other running store where they will watch you run on a treadmill (some will video you) in order to fit you and your running gait to the right kind of shoe. It will cost you more money, but it is well worth it.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Hell no, I use gummy worms sometimes.
    My favorite on-the-bike eats are popcorn and rice cakes. Mmmm... goes down smooth.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by az_cholla
    Especially if you want to avoid injury. Go to Run AZ, Runner's Den, Sole Sports, Roadrunner Sports, or any other running store where they will watch you run on a treadmill (some will video you) in order to fit you and your running gait to the right kind of shoe. It will cost you more money, but it is well worth it.
    +1 on this. In my 20+ years of running, I discovered, the hard way, that arches and such change (fall, esp if you're a woman) as you age, and thus you need to change the kind of shoe you wear so that's it's specific to your needs. Runner's Den did right by me, although you'll pay a little bit more than if you grabbed the same shoe at Sports Authority.
    (I found about a $10-15 hike)

    I'm currently eyeballing the technique of running in no-support, minimalist shoes, which is the "newest" (and oldest) form of running, which some ultra-marathoners swear by. They say the comfort and structure that running shoes provide, coddle your feet, but change the way your ankles, hips, and back respond, resulting in injury.

    I don't know... sounds a bit bat-chit crazy to me, but I'll admit I'm curious.
    "People do not lack strength; they lack will" (Victor Hugo)

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by CoyoteKis
    I'm currently eyeballing the technique of running in no-support, minimalist shoes, which is the "newest" (and oldest) form of running, which some ultra-marathoners swear by. They say the comfort and structure that running shoes provide, coddle your feet, but change the way your ankles, hips, and back respond, resulting in injury.

    I don't know... sounds a bit bat-chit crazy to me, but I'll admit I'm curious.

    I have a friend that is doing this "minimalist" approach, and she likes it. You do need to work up to longer distances, but she ran her last leg on our Ragnar Relay team (6 hilly miles) in her Vibram Five Fingers. I've heard that the best way to try this out (with minimalist shoes or just barefoot) is to do some running in a grassy park first. I'd like to try this too, but I'm not yet ready to buck the conventional wisdom. If you try it, let me know how it goes......

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by az_cholla
    I've heard that the best way to try this out (with minimalist shoes or just barefoot) is to do some running in a grassy park first. I'd like to try this too, but I'm not yet ready to buck the conventional wisdom. If you try it, let me know how it goes......
    I was SO hoping you would go first.

    At this point, after seven years of living in the desert and flip-flops, the heels and balls of my feet resemble something more akin to hooves than lady-feet , so I guess I don't have anything to lose, but I admit to being nervous about permanent damage if it turns out it's "not for me".

    I took to trail running because the endless miles on asphalt were doing a number on me, so to now head back to the road barefoot or in something resembling my Nana's slippers, well, let's just say I haven't made up my mind yet. But if I do (who am I kidding... I HAVE to try this, so make that WHEN I do), I'll definitely let you know what I think.
    "People do not lack strength; they lack will" (Victor Hugo)

  86. #86
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    Good thread, and some nice advice. I have added road riding to my deal about 6 months ago and feel it has helped my overall fitness. I do mix in interval sprints while on the road to get my HR up. I am not steady on doing core/strength so I need to make more time for it. I am still experimenting with nutrition.........

    Philbo-I hit Taliesin-Lost dog, Jeep Trail, Ringtail-Lost Dog and finally down Quartz today after work. Good loop and I know you mentioned you wanted to complete that Lost Dog climb. PM me if you want to hit it some time. May need to be a weekend AM ride, but today was awesome weather and I saw 4 people the entire loop.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    So, if you wake up, look at your schedule and see your first meeting has been move and if you act fast and get out the door now you can get in an hour ride, what do you try to eat?

    This happened this morning and I ate a banana with peanut butter on it while prepping my gear. Other suggestions?
    I'd pound a cup of coffee getting ready for the ride, eat a bowl of microwaved instant oatmeal, then have a cup of coffee driving to the ride. Do the banana and peanut butter when I get home, or on the drive home, bring it with you in the car. If I sweated a lot, I'd eat a couple spears of dill pickle when I got home, for cramp control, then a couple tall glasses of water.

    I don't know why, but for me, coffee allows me to not be subject to as much pain when I run anerobic and really hard when pushing beyond my comfort zone on sprints. Maybe it's just psychological, I have no proof of it, other than seat of the pants meter says it's so.

  88. #88
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    Interesting (if you're a science nerd like me), tangentially related article from SciAm: Unlocking the Chemistry of Exercise: How Metabolites Separate the Physically Fit from Unfit. It references another article with the interesting subtitle: "Untrained mice dosed with a drug that induces the same effects as rigorous training ran as far as conditioned rodent athletes did."

  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by dtownmtb
    Oh yeah, and come on out to an AES (http://rockyroad5050.wordpress.com/) event.
    Best way to really build endurance is to do endurance. That is AES' specialty, endurance and ultra-endurace. 35-250 mile races that will test your very being and your will to live/push through the pain.

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