Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: The heat?

  1. #1
    Racerboy Wannabe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    79

    The heat?

    Hey guys,

    Ok, so I'm moving to Phoenix and I've heard before (and read here) that the heat kills riding during the day. I can certainly understand when the mercury gets over 110 that you're not going to want to be out in it without being prepared, but I'm wondering if there's something about it that makes it any worse in Phoenix than the same temperature a few thousand feet higher?

    When I lived in El Paso, I road during the entire summer. Granted, I didn't have that many rides where it was over 100, but I did do them. You always had to have plenty of sunscreen on and plenty of water. It wasn't unheard of for me to have 6+ liters of water if I was going to be out for a little more than 2 hours.

    Of course, at the time I was acclimated to the weather, was drinking 3 -5 liters of water a day + what I drank while riding. I had people look at me funny when they heard I would ride in that kind of weather, but it doesn't seem that much different than Phoenix. Is there something unique to the area that makes being out during the day more dangerous?
    Travis S - blog

  2. #2
    I railed it like Kong
    Reputation: Arkon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    637
    There is a big difference between 100 degree rides and 115 degree rides. My description would be damn hot vs. oppressive. I've tried to do it and can't. But i am not the icon of fitness either. You'll want cdub for that.

    This is the part where he explains that the heat is fine if you just don't wear a helmet.
    I'm UNIQUE... just like everybody else.

  3. #3
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,280
    Quote Originally Posted by rkonindustry
    There is a big difference between 100 degree rides and 115 degree rides. My description would be damn hot vs. oppressive. I've tried to do it and can't. But i am not the icon of fitness either. You'll want cdub for that.

    This is the part where he explains that the heat is fine if you just don't wear a helmet.

    Totally agree. I have lived here 20 years. Mild means 85. Hot but rideable is 95 to 100. Oven like feeling happens about 110 and up, it's a different kinda heat.

  4. #4
    Ride 'Til Your Knees Hurt
    Reputation: cycljunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,044

    Early start, lots of water...

    June, July and August plan your start times for around 5:30am or so. If you have lights, do night rides. During the week I usually start my ride at 6pm and take it easy for the first 30 minutes or so until the sun starts to go down. A hydration system that can hold a 100oz. bladder is pretty much standard issue. Keep in mind that Prescott and Flag are only a few hours away. Lots of people plan group rides in thoses two areas during the summer months. Don't let the heat discourage you...

  5. #5
    Hey, wait up!
    Reputation: LCdaveH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,534

    The Heat is on

    Quote Originally Posted by .downhillfaster.
    But it's a dry heat, you should be OK.

    So's an electric oven - or a blast furnance. Doesn't mean I want to ride in one.

    When your tires start to melt into the rocks, its probably time to head back.

    Not that Las Cruces / El Paso has been exactly cool. 105.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,529
    Welcome to Phoenix... you should do well here.

    Just make sure you ride with someone... just in case...

    The heat can and does kill, you sound like you're used to it and know what you're doing... just be careful, it sneaks up on you when you least expect it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Travis S
    Hey guys,

    Ok, so I'm moving to Phoenix and I've heard before (and read here) that the heat kills riding during the day. I can certainly understand when the mercury gets over 110 that you're not going to want to be out in it without being prepared, but I'm wondering if there's something about it that makes it any worse in Phoenix than the same temperature a few thousand feet higher?

    When I lived in El Paso, I road during the entire summer. Granted, I didn't have that many rides where it was over 100, but I did do them. You always had to have plenty of sunscreen on and plenty of water. It wasn't unheard of for me to have 6+ liters of water if I was going to be out for a little more than 2 hours.

    Of course, at the time I was acclimated to the weather, was drinking 3 -5 liters of water a day + what I drank while riding. I had people look at me funny when they heard I would ride in that kind of weather, but it doesn't seem that much different than Phoenix. Is there something unique to the area that makes being out during the day more dangerous?

  7. #7
    Ride 'Til Your Knees Hurt
    Reputation: cycljunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,044

    Idea! There's Always an Upside...

    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH
    When your tires start to melt into the rocks, its probably time to head back.
    Those few minutes just before the tires DO melt... Man that's some good traction!

  8. #8
    Racerboy Wannabe
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    79
    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    Totally agree. I have lived here 20 years. Mild means 85. Hot but rideable is 95 to 100. Oven like feeling happens about 110 and up, it's a different kinda heat.
    That's what I was thinking... it just seems like 10 degrees wouldn't make that big of a difference. I guess it's really just a matter of seeing how your body reacts and knowing enough about it to know when it's saying its had enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by cycljunkie
    If you have lights... A hydration system that can hold a 100oz. bladder is pretty much standard issue.
    Check and check. The 100 oz. camelbak is pretty much all you see unless it's race down in southern NM, too. Out here, they (camelbaks/hydration packs in general) aren't as prevalent... kind of shocked me at first.
    Travis S - blog

  9. #9
    MTBR Mafia
    Reputation: cdub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,553
    Quote Originally Posted by rkonindustry
    You'll want cdub for that.

    This is the part where he explains that the heat is fine if you just don't wear a helmet.
    haha since i was called into this. come on its nothin. this whole year has been rideable and it keeps you cooler if you have your helmet buckled to the back of you camelback so your head gets more of that ever present breeze. lol. i have no idea why i just wrote that but congrats on movin to phoenix. remember to look into ahwatukee, then we, my friends, can show you all the best places.
    All Mountain was so 2005

  10. #10
    Ouch, I am hot!
    Reputation: Dirdir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,764
    I don't know why, perhaps it is the thickness of the air, but the sun hurts more in Phoenix than other places. In my limited experience, 100 here is worse than 100 in the San Fenando Valley where I grew up.

    Much worse is the fact that during the worst months, Phoenix cools off much less in the evening/night.

    The severity of it all also depends on where you are riding. Saturday I rode Desert Classic and was toasting towards the end. I finished my T100 Monday ride at around the same time of day as the Saturday ride, but I felt much cooler. Perhaps it was the pace, or something else, but on Monday the heat was not even close to the burning on Saturday. Honestly, I don't know why. Coming back on DC towards the Ramadas after a long ride is just nasty hot.
    I AM JUST A JERK

  11. #11
    Ride 'Til Your Knees Hurt
    Reputation: cycljunkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,044
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    I don't know why. Coming back on DC towards the Ramadas after a long ride is just nasty hot.
    Geoff, that's because you were pedaling like a mad-man! I don't think we stopped once after coming down Highline!

  12. #12
    Ouch, I am hot!
    Reputation: Dirdir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,764
    Quote Originally Posted by cycljunkie
    Geoff, that's because you were pedaling like a mad-man! I don't think we stopped once after coming down Highline!
    I didn't want to stop and melt. No actually, the real reason was because I didn't want to have to listen to Walt and his constant yapping. Don't say anything to him though.
    I AM JUST A JERK

  13. #13
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,046
    You wouldn't think so, but in this environment, there is a substantial difference between 100 degrees and 110-112. In May and early June, I was riding two or three times a week at 4 p.m. (the hottest time of the day). Since then, I've been on actual trail rides once, because I'm not a morning person.

    You may do 112-degree rides once or twice, but even if you're fit, you'll pay over the next couple of days.

    Course, you'll find out about all of that when you try moving all your crap in August
    d

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    63

    ... and if we just ...

    This my opinion of the heat here in the valley. I work out side for thecity oy of mesa all year round so I do have a strong opinion of the heat.
    It not so much the temp it is the sun beating down on you cooking you from inside out. I can ride in 105 degree heat at night an d fell great but with sun beating on me it kills me the same thing at work . So you can ride all summer here just if you pick the right times of the day or night to do it.
    I wish it was OCTOBER.

  15. #15
    Ouch, I am hot!
    Reputation: Dirdir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    4,764
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy
    This my opinion of the heat here in the valley. I work out side for thecity oy of mesa all year round so I do have a strong opinion of the heat.
    It not so much the temp it is the sun beating down on you cooking you from inside out. I can ride in 105 degree heat at night an d fell great but with sun beating on me it kills me the same thing at work . So you can ride all summer here just if you pick the right times of the day or night to do it.
    I wish it was OCTOBER.
    Translation - The Sun Hurts More in Phoenix.
    I AM JUST A JERK

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jaybird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    233
    Quote Originally Posted by Dirdir
    I don't know why, perhaps it is the thickness of the air, but the sun hurts more in Phoenix than other places.
    I agree. It's not really the heat that beats me up, it's the sun beating down on me. I too ride early morning or in the late evening / night throughout the summer.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    64

    Night riding

    When you get down to it it is July, Aug, and Sept that are really hot here. Start the ride at 5:30 and it is not too bad.

    Also riding at Night is a blast! I think it is hotter than the early morning but it is a lot of fun. It makes you look at the trail in a whole new way. I have cleared sections at night that I had not cleared during the day.

  18. #18
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    9,280
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis S
    That's what I was thinking... it just seems like 10 degrees wouldn't make that big of a difference. I guess it's really just a matter of seeing how your body reacts and knowing enough about it to know when it's saying its had enough.


    Check and check. The 100 oz. camelbak is pretty much all you see unless it's race down in southern NM, too. Out here, they (camelbaks/hydration packs in general) aren't as prevalent... kind of shocked me at first.

    If you come in August the actual temp will have dropped to the 104/105 range many days but the humidity will have risen making it hot in a different way than 114 with 8 percent humidity.
    Either way requires a hydro pack.

  19. #19
    It rains here. :(
    Reputation: Umbrous's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,314
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbrodieposer
    I have cleared sections at night that I had not cleared during the day.

    Hmm...out of sight, out of mind...

    This might work for me, perhaps my balls won't see the danger that lies ahead.

Similar Threads

  1. Beating the winter heat
    By radair in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 02-08-2005, 02:20 PM
  2. 'Cause it's the heat of the moment...
    By CrashTheDOG in forum Turner
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 07-20-2004, 07:07 AM
  3. Avid CPS heat and rotor clearance
    By AL29er in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-14-2004, 03:29 PM
  4. Riding in the heat??
    By billybobzia in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-14-2004, 03:15 PM
  5. Allergic to Heat (Training for heat)
    By SurlyBob in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-24-2004, 08:16 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.