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  1. #1
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    The Green Thing- Viewers Under 50 Please Ignore

    I know I should not have posted this but it does talk about riding a bike:


    The Green Thing

    Checking out at the store, the
    young cashier suggested to the older woman that she should bring her own
    grocery bags because plastic bags weren't good for the
    environment.

    The woman apologized and explained, "We didn't have
    this green thing back in my earlier days."

    The clerk responded,
    "That's our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our
    environment for future generations."

    She was right -- our
    generation didn't have the green thing in its day or didn't call it
    "green."

    Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer
    bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed
    and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and
    over. So they really were recycled. But we didn't have the green thing
    back in our day.

    We walked up stairs, because we didn't have an
    escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery
    store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to
    go two blocks. But she was right. We didn't have the green thing in our
    day.

    Back then, we washed the baby's diapers because we didn't have
    the throw-away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling
    machine burning up 220 volts -- wind and solar power really did dry our
    clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their
    brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is
    right. We didn't have the green thing back in our day.

    Back then,
    we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And the
    TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a
    screen the size of the state of Montana . In the kitchen, we blended and
    stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything
    for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up
    old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap
    Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the
    lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by
    working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that
    operate on electricity. But she's right. We didn't have the green
    thing back then.

    We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty
    instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of
    water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and
    we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the
    whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the green
    thing back then.

    Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus, and
    kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms
    into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not
    an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need
    a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000
    miles out in space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.

    But
    isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were
    just because we didn't have the green thing back then?

    Please
    forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in
    conservation from a smartass young person.


    Remember: Don't
    make old people mad.


    We don't like being old in the
    first place, so it doesn't take much to tick us
    off.
    #####

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    POTY right 'chere. Keep doing what you are doing TD!!!!

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    You tend to forget "how it used to be." Especially about the electrical outlets. We have the whole family over for the holidays & we have run out of places to plug things in. Phones, computers, video game, hair dryers, curling irons............................................. ... etc.
    dm

  4. #4
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    You are so right about a lot of this stuff. It makes my heart sad to see the rampant wastage and overuse of resources that people are becoming used to now. Having said that however, there are a great many things now that I very much enjoy that we did not have in my youth, one of which being the big old TV in my front room. Now if one of those smart young people can figure out how to make interesting and worthwhile things to show on there, it would be great. Thank you very much!

    Almost forgot... I really like lightweight, fully suspended bikes too, but when I was a kid on my boat anchor Hercules, I know I had as much fun as any kid these days on their souped up spesh. Just sayin...
    It's all Here. Now.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc View Post
    I know I should not have posted this but it does talk about riding a bike:


    The Green Thing

    Checking out at the store, the
    young cashier suggested to the older woman that she should bring her own
    grocery bags because plastic bags weren't good for the
    environment.

    The woman apologized and explained, "We didn't have
    this green thing back in my earlier days."

    The clerk responded,
    "That's our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our
    environment for future generations."

    She was right -- our
    generation didn't have the green thing in its day or didn't call it
    "green."

    Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer
    bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed
    and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and
    over. So they really were recycled. But we didn't have the green thing
    back in our day.

    We walked up stairs, because we didn't have an
    escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery
    store and didn't climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to
    go two blocks. But she was right. We didn't have the green thing in our
    day.

    Back then, we washed the baby's diapers because we didn't have
    the throw-away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling
    machine burning up 220 volts -- wind and solar power really did dry our
    clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their
    brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is
    right. We didn't have the green thing back in our day.

    Back then,
    we had one TV, or radio, in the house -- not a TV in every room. And the
    TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a
    screen the size of the state of Montana . In the kitchen, we blended and
    stirred by hand because we didn't have electric machines to do everything
    for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up
    old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap
    Back then, we didn't fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the
    lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by
    working so we didn't need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that
    operate on electricity. But she's right. We didn't have the green
    thing back then.

    We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty
    instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of
    water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and
    we replaced the razor blades in a razor instead of throwing away the
    whole razor just because the blade got dull. But we didn't have the green
    thing back then.

    Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus, and
    kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms
    into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical outlet in a room, not
    an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn't need
    a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000
    miles out in space in order to find the nearest pizza joint.

    But
    isn't it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were
    just because we didn't have the green thing back then?

    Please
    forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in
    conservation from a smartass young person.


    Remember: Don't
    make old people mad.


    We don't like being old in the
    first place, so it doesn't take much to tick us
    off.
    #####
    Sounds like progress simply made things more user friendly for the masses.


    Good read. I'm now getting in my truck. Loading up my plastic water bag to enjoy the day.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome. :)

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    good read.
    How about this generations electric vehicles... what do they plan to do with the batteries?
    Do you think in 20 or 30 years they will be collectible and desirable restoration projects?
    Nope, they’ll be with all the other overflowing problematic “landfills”.

    This generation, has created a disposable environment.

    Crap they buy cars more frequently than I buy jeans.
    My bike, Slayer 70

  7. #7
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    Thanks TD, I've been missing all of the forwards from Nana and Poppop since I changed email accounts.

  8. #8
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    Nice write up..I could kick off on a rant with that one as my launch ramp, but I need to conserve the energy for riding my bike...
    Last edited by 5bravobravo; 12-24-2011 at 10:16 PM.
    Check my pulse...

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    I would love to hang my clothes outside to dry, and air, especially in Arizona. But if I do that I'll get an infraction notice from the HOA.

    If I could find a place in Fountain Hills to recycle glass I'd be happy. As it is I have to drive to a recycling station in Mesa.

    Not so green.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Two Jack View Post
    As it is I have to drive to a recycling station in Mesa.
    i take 2 SUVs full of collapsed cardboard boxes there every week. i'd be f'd without that place.

    and TD, don't think us younger guys dont know anything about the 50's... remember, we had THREE back to the future movies as kids.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle64 View Post
    Sounds like progress simply made things more user friendly for the masses.


    Good read. I'm now getting in my truck. Loading up my plastic water bag to enjoy the day.
    Really makes you think... But this message would be really tough to read right now if you had used the telegraph
    Make Flagstaff RAD Again.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by sinatorj View Post
    Really makes you think... But this message would be really tough to read right now if you had used the telegraph
    or delivered by Pony Express.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome. :)

  13. #13
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    Man, I feel so bad for not owning a Gaming Console, TV, Or car, And I feel so bad for buying most of my clothes used.

    and jeez, I feel so bad for drinking from reusable water bottles.

    I feel so bad for getting exercise on my bike.

    And for carrying my bike up 3 flights of stairs to my Classrooms.

    I feel even worse for having a bus pass.

    but what really must make me evil is how I use this demonic modern little laptop as my Record Player,
    Library,
    Typewriter,
    telephone,
    Television,
    sketchbook,
    newspaper,
    Comic book,
    DVD player
    And Canvas.

    God, whenever will my ignorant, ungrateful plebeian mind learn?

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    Wow TD, this really brings back memories for me, ( I am as old or older that you ) and I remember in the late 50" and early 60's I would steal the bottles off everybodys carport and traded them in for beer and or dope money . ( my paper route money was not enough to party on )

    Everybody had single car , maybe double car, carport out here and very few if any ever had garages .


    Rural road and Southern was a single lane dirt road with a 4 way stop sign , and not every one had a TV ,

    Our TV was a 9" Zenith black a white from the 50"s.

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    Right On, Brother! I was born at the end of the 50's. The era of 60's was when society started thinking about saving the earth. Thank god for the hippies. We called it Ecology back then and not "Going Green" you may want to enlighten the young cashier next time your in line. We lived in a time when things were repairable and built to last and not cheaply massed produced and disposable like they are today. I remember my mother patching my pants when I wore holes in them and when they wore out she made shorts out of them. When the tv went on the fritz my dad and I would go down to the 7-11 for replacement vacuum tubes. Do you remember the vacuum tube tester? I was raised in Florida and there was no way that I would have used a push-blade mower. The grass grew quickly and a gas power mower was the only way to get the job done. Gas was cheap then. Thanks for the memories. One last thing. We has to used our brains in class. We didn't have calculators or computers. I'm done now. I'll go back to my rocking chair on the front porch.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by rock wrangler View Post
    Right On, Brother! I was born at the end of the 50's. The era of 60's was when society started thinking about saving the earth. Thank god for the hippies. We called it Ecology back then and not "Going Green" you may want to enlighten the young cashier next time your in line. We lived in a time when things were repairable and built to last and not cheaply massed produced and disposable like they are today. I remember my mother patching my pants when I wore holes in them and when they wore out she made shorts out of them. When the tv went on the fritz my dad and I would go down to the 7-11 for replacement vacuum tubes. Do you remember the vacuum tube tester? I was raised in Florida and there was no way that I would have used a push-blade mower. The grass grew quickly and a gas power mower was the only way to get the job done. Gas was cheap then. Thanks for the memories. One last thing. We has to used our brains in class. We didn't have calculators or computers. I'm done now. I'll go back to my rocking chair on the front porch.
    Oh my God, I forgot all about that dam "TV vacuum tube tester" , I got pretty good at using it and keeping the old Zenith kinda working , ----it took about 5 min to warm up , and I had to keep screwing with the rabbit ears to get all 4 of the 5 channels we had in town .......boy times have sure changed .

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    TD-I am right with ya and yes, this is the disposable generation. "Over 90% of everything is junk"-one of my favorite quotes. Americans seem to like more of lower quality and so little of high quality goods. Just throw it away...wastefull and incredibly lazy, and look where this has gotten us..........................................

  18. #18
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    I remember those days.

    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome. :)

  19. #19
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    I hope I arrive to my 60's a little less jaded, holy crap are you guys trying to be stereotypes of grumpy old dudes?!?

    Also Happy Christmas everybody!

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    I remember those days too, but I don't remember having a 7 inch travel shred sled.

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    Quote Originally Posted by m77ranger View Post
    I hope I arrive to my 60's a little less jaded, holy crap are you guys trying to be stereotypes of grumpy old dudes?!?

    Also Happy Christmas everybody!
    Lost are the days of unfiltered smoke stacks. Dumping tires and chemicals in lakes, rivers or any other place that was convenient. Child labor was the norm. Yes mom patched our jeans. Not because she wanted to but because she could not afford another pair.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome. :)

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle64 View Post
    I remember those days.

    Man that commercial really just hit home in the 70' , I can't stand litter bugs , that really pisses me off



    Quote Originally Posted by m77ranger View Post
    I hope I arrive to my 60's a little less jaded, holy crap are you guys trying to be stereotypes of grumpy old dudes?!?

    Also Happy Christmas everybody!
    We really don't mean to be grumpy old bastards , we really are very happy and enjoy life to the fullest, ....but "Jaded " we are , the hardest thing to understand in life is CHANGE , and thats what life does is CHANGE .

    After your go through 4 wives , loose acoupple houses and several vehicles and 3/4 of all your life savings , ......the wisdom you gain is very costly on your heart ,stomach and mind .

    Now I get to have Christmas with my 4 EX wives , their husbands and my grown children and go through the usual fights and crap and be very happy all the way through ........year after year after year ..............so I am really happy , but I am "Jaded" ...

    I know that some day you will have alot of earned Wisdom also and you will look through life through different colored glasses too.

    Getting old is not for the week hearted

    Merry Christmas and happy new year !!

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelstr View Post
    Man that commercial really just hit home in the 70' , I can't stand litter bugs , that really pisses me off





    We really don't mean to be grumpy old bastards , we really are very happy and enjoy life to the fullest, ....but "Jaded " we are , the hardest thing to understand in life is CHANGE , and thats what life does is CHANGE .

    After your go through 4 wives , loose acoupple houses and several vehicles and 3/4 of all your life savings , ......the wisdom you gain is very costly on your heart ,stomach and mind .

    Now I get to have Christmas with my 4 EX wives , their husbands and my grown children and go through the usual fights and crap and be very happy all the way through ........year after year after year ..............so I am really happy , but I am "Jaded" ...

    I know that some day you will have alot of earned Wisdom also and you will look through life through different colored glasses too.

    Getting old is not for the week hearted

    Merry Christmas and happy new year !!
    Dang! I don't want that wisdom!

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    Quote Originally Posted by tls36 View Post
    TD-I am right with ya and yes, this is the disposable generation. "Over 90% of everything is junk"-one of my favorite quotes. Americans seem to like more of lower quality and so little of high quality goods. Just throw it away...wastefull and incredibly lazy, and look where this has gotten us..........................................

    I hear you man, nobody really thinks to fix anything anymore and I would wager that technology is more wasteful and more of a polluter than oil. All this technology fills landfills across the world with dangerous materials year after year.

    Could you imagine some prissy Snottsdale housewife using cloth diapers

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    Quote Originally Posted by m77ranger View Post
    Dang! I don't want that wisdom!
    Aw, just give your self some time, youngster. It'll come....

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    Quote Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
    I remember those days too, but I don't remember having a 7 inch travel shred sled.
    God I remember back in the days of DH runs on 3 inches of travel and a Dirt bros chainguide. Kids today and their disk brakes and wide bars.
    Make Flagstaff RAD Again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycle64 View Post
    I remember those days.

    And now I go to the reservation and I am the one crying at what I see
    Tie two birds together and though they have four wings, they cannot fly!

  28. #28
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    but in the 70's, they had Spectreman to fight pollution.


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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike View Post
    but in the 70's, they had Spectreman to fight pollution.

    Oh my , I used to watch "Spectreman" with my first daughter , she loved that goofy show .

    Spectreman was sent by "Nebula 71" to keep Dr.Gori from destroying planet earth because of our littering and pollution or something like that

    It was a strange Japanese sci fi , I had to do bongs just to get through it with her , I just did not like it the way she did .

    I really loved "Lost In Space" much better

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    it's funny to me how we now have awesome space age technology bikes that are ultralight, great suspension, tubleless, disc brakes, 29ers, plethora of tire choices, ergon grips, carbon, ti, gps, and gopro cams......yet it seems ss, non-suspended, heavier, old school cruisers, heavy 50 lb snowbikes want one!) are getting popular too. Cycling gone full circle.

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    and race vintage 70's-80's motocross races on restored obsolete machines, 2-strokes with inferior suspension. Still fast, fun, and much more cost efficient compared to the new technology machines. Try rebuilding a 2012 4-stroke engine....way expensive, so many just ride 'em to death, sell/throw away, and buy another. WTF is wrong with that picture?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by tls36 View Post
    TD-I am right with ya and yes, this is the disposable generation. "Over 90% of everything is junk"-one of my favorite quotes. Americans seem to like more of lower quality and so little of high quality goods. Just throw it away...wastefull and incredibly lazy, and look where this has gotten us..........................................
    It actually pisses me off that everything is disposable and I was born in the 70's. I buy a vaccum for $150 and its dead in a year. Its cheaper to chuck it and buy a new one than get it fixed. Its not just the consumers that are of a "disposable" mindset, its the manufacturers making things like garbabe knowing you will buy more next year. If they make a vacuum that lasts 20 years and is easily servicable by the consumer how will they make any money?
    Last edited by Douger-1; 12-25-2011 at 01:42 PM.
    “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did." Mark Twain

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    Quote Originally Posted by Douger-1 View Post
    It actually pisses me off that everything is disposable and I was born int he 70's. I buy a vaccum for $150 and its dead in a year. Its cheaper to chuck it and buy a new one than get it fixed. Its not just the consumers that are of a "disposable" mindset, its the manufacturers making things like garbabe knowing you will buy more next year. If they make a vacuum that lasts 20 years and is easily servicable by the consumer how will they make any money?
    So true, Not really many repair shops around anymore. Funny story, my boss was SHOCKED when I replaced the motor in my 94 4runner, couldn't understand why I wouldn't just use that money to put a down payment on a leased car and save myself some money.

    There was really nothing else wrong with the truck and is actually in great shape for being that old, no rust etc. I told him, bottom line is they don't make trucks like they use to. I then reminded him how much his insurance went because his shiny new X5 just got all smashed in the rear, smashed because it has no metal bumper and it cracked liked cheap plastic.

    After paying deductible, rental car fees and insurance rates going up etc, he has spent almost as much as I did on replacing the engine in the old 4runner and I don't have to "turn" the car in 3 years down the line.

    Its easier to just replace things and yes, it does make us lazier....

    Buggy Out!

  34. #34
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    the little green thing is what my hs girlfriend and i called a trojan ends, before we were freaky enough to learn about pre-lubed in the light blue packet.

    i have no idea the implications of this revelation, in the context of this thread. time for more eggnog!
    YES to Scottsdale Prop 420
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    Great "Back then list" Traildoc! I have a couple more AZ specific things to add to your list.

    I was born in 1952 and grew up right here at about 8700 East Apache Trail. This was mostly open desert back then. Very few houses and businesses at all.

    Anyway, back then we did not have air conditioning on our house, no one did. We did not have the ability to turn down the thermostat, let alone set a programable thermostat. Guess what we survived just fine. We slept outside in the summer and doused our necks with corn starch to keep from getting heat rash. Around about the beginning of the '60's we got an evap cooler on the house and started sleeping inside during the summer.

    Also, back then we drove our cars with all the windows down (open) in the summer time! When my wife an I got married back in the '70's, we thought a car with air conditioning was a luxury. AC was actually an "option" on cars back then. Cars came stock with a heater and that was it. So you had to pay extra for air conditioning. Can you even find a car without AC today?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Campagnolo View Post
    Great "Back then list" Traildoc! I have a couple more AZ specific things to add to your list.

    I was born in 1952 and grew up right here at about 8700 East Apache Trail. This was mostly open desert back then. Very few houses and businesses at all.

    Anyway, back then we did not have air conditioning on our house, no one did. We did not have the ability to turn down the thermostat, let alone set a programable thermostat. Guess what we survived just fine. We slept outside in the summer and doused our necks with corn starch to keep from getting heat rash. Around about the beginning of the '60's we got an evap cooler on the house and started sleeping inside during the summer.

    Also, back then we drove our cars with all the windows down (open) in the summer time! When my wife an I got married back in the '70's, we thought a car with air conditioning was a luxury. AC was actually an "option" on cars back then. Cars came stock with a heater and that was it. So you had to pay extra for air conditioning. Can you even find a car without AC today?
    Just looked at a car with no A/c this week .... but it was a jeep soft top
    I dig dirt!

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    Good one TD. This really digs at one of my pet peeves. So called "green" electric cars are a joke. That electricity has to be made at some power plant most likely burning fossil fuel. It is way more efficient to put the fossil fuel right in the car than to use it to heat water to run a generator to make electricity then run the electricity through transmission lines and several transformers, inverters, chargers then finally use it to run a car. The second law of thermodynamics requires that each and every of these energy transformation wastes energy (as heat). Way more is wasted making the wheels of an electric car go around than a gas guzzler. To say the electric cars have zero emissions is a lie. Much more fossil fuel must be burned at the power plant to make up for all the power loss along the way than if the fuel was burned in the engine directly. And then there is the whole battery production and disposal business...

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Campagnolo View Post
    Great "Back then list" Traildoc! I have a couple more AZ specific things to add to your list.

    I was born in 1952 and grew up right here at about 8700 East Apache Trail. This was mostly open desert back then. Very few houses and businesses at all.

    Anyway, back then we did not have air conditioning on our house, no one did. We did not have the ability to turn down the thermostat, let alone set a programable thermostat. Guess what we survived just fine. We slept outside in the summer and doused our necks with corn starch to keep from getting heat rash. Around about the beginning of the '60's we got an evap cooler on the house and started sleeping inside during the summer.

    Also, back then we drove our cars with all the windows down (open) in the summer time! When my wife an I got married back in the '70's, we thought a car with air conditioning was a luxury. AC was actually an "option" on cars back then. Cars came stock with a heater and that was it. So you had to pay extra for air conditioning. Can you even find a car without AC today?
    Cool story bro, I bet you still like the A/C though. I bet your parents generation was saying the same kind of stuff. "these damn kids and their color T.V.s, we had to live through a depression and then kill a bunch of Nazis so these ungrateful bastards can watch lassie on the couch and stuff their faces with tang and Twinkies all day."

  39. #39
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    I am so sorry you had to live without A/C all those years ago. I am sure that suffering gave you character.

    and the fact that I spent most of 2010 and 2011 sleeping on a porch with ZERO AC or heat... that really doesn't give me any kind of insight at all.

    how dare I be gratefu thatl I at least had a door! I mean, being able to keep the neighborhoods stray dogs out is clearly not a luxury my "green" butt deserves.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by m77ranger View Post
    Cool story bro, I bet you still like the A/C though. I bet your parents generation was saying the same kind of stuff. "these damn kids and their color T.V.s, we had to live through a depression and then kill a bunch of Nazis so these ungrateful bastards can watch lassie on the couch and stuff their faces with tang and Twinkies all day."

  41. #41
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    Hey Doc. I can't help myself... I have to add another twisted dimension to your post. But before I do I have to give a heartfelt Thanks:

    Thanks for the great company on the ride yesterday. Spec. ED ROCKED!
    Thanks for the hospitality and sharing a great meal. We had a good time.
    Thanks for your great sense of humor and desire to keep young idealists like me honest.

    I agree with almost everything in your post. However, I have a couple of questions.

    1)Who started the majority of those companies that design and manufacture all that stuff that our younger generation is polluting the world with?

    2)It's true that us young folks are demanding. We want all those things but, Who taught us? We didn't learn to want all those things and, that having them would solve all of our problems on our own. Did we?

    Like Kermit the frog said "It's hard being green"

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by CANADIANBACON View Post
    Hey Doc. I can't help myself... I have to add another twisted dimension to your post. But before I do I have to give a heartfelt Thanks:

    Thanks for the great company on the ride yesterday. Spec. ED ROCKED!
    Thanks for the hospitality and sharing a great meal. We had a good time.
    Thanks for your great sense of humor and desire to keep young idealists like me honest.

    I agree with almost everything in your post. However, I have a couple of questions.

    1)Who started the majority of those companies that design and manufacture all that stuff that our younger generation is polluting the world with?

    2)It's true that us young folks are demanding. We want all those things but, Who taught us? We didn't learn to want all those things and, that having them would solve all of our problems on our own. Did we?

    Like Kermit the frog said "It's hard being green"
    CB:

    When I just Goggled the Green Thing I note that the post goes back at least to Nov 15th, so for me to take credit for its originality would be called plagiarism. That being said I have experienced all those changes due to my age and I do think a lot of the Green Thing going on these days is not going to change the reality that the world we know is naturally changing faster than we will ever be able to stop the negative changes.

    The Christmas ride was great and it was fun bouncing off our different takes on how the mountain biking scene is evolving in Sedona. You and possibly others think the FS will allow the mountain biking community to participate in the construction of a really cool new (beginner, intermediate, advanced ??????) multi-use trail in Sedona after they go through all the approval formalities necessary to start the actual moving of dirt and rock.

    Your estimate is less than three years, where mine is more than ten years. I hope you are correct, but only time will tell if you have a firm grasp of reality. My feeling is that we have numerous trails in the current adoption process and we have numerous user built trails (Special Ed., etc.) that need to be brought into the system at hundreds of thousands in taxpayer dollars.

    The last I looked most Federal Budgets are being cut and to think scoping and adopting of Sedona trails is going to be a priority in the coming years is not going to happen very easily. It is much less expensive to adopt well laid out current user built trails then it is to allow the building of a new beginner (intermediate, advanced) multi-use trail.

    TD

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by CANADIANBACON View Post
    Like Kermit the frog said "It's hard being green"
    FWIW, Kermit said "it's not easy being green". .
    My bike, Slayer 70

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