Fork Air Pressure and Tuning Advice- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Addicted to 2 wheels
    Reputation: SugarHigh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    956

    Fork Air Pressure and Tuning Advice

    I have a 29er hardtail with a Rock Shox Torah with 100 mm of travel. I ride hawse mainly. I am more of an XC rider that likes tech. I could use some advice on tuning it, and forks in general.

    I went down a techy down hill pretty fast with the lock out activated and it felt pretty good. It was more stable. I mentioned it at the shop and the mechanic said I was at 50psi and he brought me up to 110. He mentioned a good rule do thumb was half your weight is the psi I you should run. I said I am about 175, but he said give it a try at that level any ways.

    The bike seems to corner a lot better now. Down hills at speed feel good. Lower speed stuff in the rocks and tech seem to have me bouncing all over the place. It is not as enjoyable and feels slower. So there seems to be a give and take relationship.

    Not sure what is more important yet. I was thinking about sticking with this setting for a bit, and then splitting the difference in a week or two.

    What do you guy run? Any insight or advice is appreciated.

    Last, there is a rebound adjustment at the bottom of one of the tubes. Any advice on setting that up? I know what rebound dampening is, but never dealt with it on a mountain bike.
    Last edited by SugarHigh; 10-16-2012 at 08:26 AM.

  2. #2
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5,340
    On the rebound...start with the fastest rebound setting and then go a few clicks in towards the slow setting and ride it....adjust one or two clicks either way and ride again. Note how it feels in a variety of terrain types...take notes if you have to....be methodical.....adjust one thing at a time and compare and contrast.

    Check out the manual for that fork online and see what they suggest....you probably have a psi table on the fork....use that as a start and then adjust your psi up or down by 5psi at a time....again, be methodical, take notes and pay attention to how it handles climbing and descending.

    It takes a lot of testing to find what is right for you...but once you figure it out, you'll be set.




  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    1,782
    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer View Post
    On the rebound...start with the fastest rebound setting and then go a few clicks in towards the slow setting and ride it....adjust one or two clicks either way and ride again. Note how it feels in a variety of terrain types...take notes if you have to....be methodical.....adjust one thing at a time and compare and contrast.

    Check out the manual for that fork online and see what they suggest....you probably have a psi table on the fork....use that as a start and then adjust your psi up or down by 5psi at a time....again, be methodical, take notes and pay attention to how it handles climbing and descending.

    It takes a lot of testing to find what is right for you...but once you figure it out, you'll be set.
    ^^ This. Faster rebound is better. If you still cant get it to were it feels right then you may want to see about getting the fork serviced. Depending on the age/miles on the fork, low oil levels and old seals could be part fo the problem.
    Killing it with close inspection.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BIGHORN LEW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    835
    try setting the sag from the fork pressure at 25%. you have a 4 inch fork. when you sit with all your weight on the bike there should be 3 inches of fork stanchion visible. then work on damping settings. always set the air pressure (sag) first.
    RAM speed: UP, UP, and away....!

  5. #5
    Addicted to 2 wheels
    Reputation: SugarHigh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    956
    Thanks for the help folks.

    Other than climbing, how do you guys use the lock out? I was thinking about running the fork low pressure for low speed tech, then engage, or partially engage the lock out for higher speed stuff. I just have not seen a benefit of the lock out for climbing. Any insight into lock out would be appreciated.

    How often do you have the fork serviced? I have no leaks. I bought the bike used, and ride it about 3 hours a week for the last year. What should I expect to pay for a service and what is replaced?

  6. #6
    Click Click Click
    Reputation: dirtbyte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,589
    Quote Originally Posted by SugarHigh View Post
    Other than climbing, how do you guys use the lock out?
    I use my lockout, well, never. I like the small bump absorption when climbing, and in the beginning when I did use it, I found that I often forgot to unlock again before bombing downhill. So I just gave up on using it all together. But that is just me

  7. #7
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    5,340
    I only use lockout on roads or REALLY buff climbing (think AZT from FR418 up to Bismarck Lake).....otherwise I'm full squish all the time. You want that suspension to absorb hits and lower your front end a bit when you are climbing so you don't pogo off of things.




  8. #8
    Carbon or Commie?
    Reputation: axisofoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    227
    I have an adjustable blowoff lockout. I set that pretty low (One click past where out-of-saddle pedalling up pavement stays locked out) and use it whenever I see a long climb coming up (going to take me longer than 30 seconds to clear). If I forget to unlock it, then its only the really small bumps that get locked out... and if I hit anything decent-to-big on the way up, it unlocks and keeps me from pogoing too much.

    If it didn't have the adjustable blowoff, I probably just wouldn't use the lockout.

  9. #9
    Huffy Rider
    Reputation: motochick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,394
    Lockout, never, cuz I always forget to unlock it! It should only be used on paved roads or super smooth dirt....but you still have to remember to unlock! Service is easy. Do it yourself for simple fluid changes, do it now before you ride again as some chambers may be low or dry. I have had 3 brand new forks with less then required or dry chambers. Instructional videos on youtube for all manufacturers. Rebuilds are mostly o-rings, they sell kits for that. Way easier then moto forks!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    428
    Just like moto Shawn ... set the sag to your body weight + gear.

    It's usually 25 to 30 percent. You'll want to look up the specs for that fork online.

    The lockout is pretty much useless except for the road.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cstem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    2,849
    Here is a link to the Rock Shox site Service Resources - RockShox | SRAM

    Find your correct year and read up on oil and air specs. Good advice here on the thread too. Set sag, tie wrap or oring on fork leg to monitor travel used, test course to check travel used after adjustments, and dial in for feel.
    be aware that you may not get it perfect, that places like Push Ind. can get it closer with a revalve or your local LBS can change the oil.

    Also remember to adjust tire psi as needed when making fork changes.
    Vassago Cycles, Shadetree Bikes, Flat Tire Bikes, Galfer Brakes USA

  12. #12
    Addicted to 2 wheels
    Reputation: SugarHigh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    956
    Big thanks for all the advice and info.

    Donna, When we going to go for a ride?

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.