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  1. #1
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    Commuters...anyone?

    OK, I'm going to start commuting to work this week. I'll be on the roadie until I can get a cheap set of wheels for the commuter. I'd rather have the road gearing but the security of the mtb commuter....plus, I'd rather the commuter get stolen than the roadie...if that were to happen.

    So, anyone else bike commute to work? How do you like it? What's been your biggest problem? I'll have a ride of 14 miles and plan to chill in the mornings and hammer it home. Great training for the OP too!
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder

    I find myself enjoying gravel more and more lately...

  2. #2
    Happy trails
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    every other saturday..

    during the "winter"i've been riding to and from work.17 miles each way.i'm riding the red hardtail i had at the FOTP.the first 12 are on the canal roads.i've got a stretch without sidewalk or shoulder that's a pain.gravel,glass all the good side of the road debris to ride thru.it's a good route otherwise.
    Aaron

  3. #3
    sprocket
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB
    What's been your biggest problem? :
    Overall, commuting is quite the positive form of cycling. My biggest problem is the complete disrespect you get from a small percentage of people driving in motor vehicles. Other than that one little odd thing, I add only the following:
    Continental Contact "with Safety System", in the 32mm version. Slime, and a Mr Tuffy Liner in the ultralight version, and about 85lbs of pressure. Or, the Continental Ultra Gator Skin in a 25c at about 100psi, with the same stuff as noted in the previous tire.



    Ride On.
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    Last edited by yetisurly; 12-12-2006 at 09:41 PM.

  4. #4
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    I have a 6 mile commute and l luckily have bike lanes nearly the entire way. I also have a shower to use, so I have it made!
    I've been riding an trek cyclocross bike that I put nitto mustache bars on. this bike rules! Having multiple hand positions for commuting is great. It allows me to get into a tuck or get my heat high around traffic. The Wheels are heavy and sturdy, I have no problem rolling over high curbs or crappy road conditions.
    I leave a pair of shoes at work and carry shirt and pants in a backpack with tube and pump.
    I've been commuting to work for a few years now and it makes work more fun. Just remember not to get into the road rage thing. ride defensively and dont swear and freak out as dumb drivers do dumb things. learn to shrug it off. no matter how pissed off people make you, calmness is your best ally on the road.

  5. #5
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    Drivers not looking, freeway crossings are seriously dangerous. Try to cross freeways at pedestrian bridges or non-car ramp bridges. Try to make eye contact with a driver waiting to turn in front of you. Use as many canals as you can, this is always my favorite part.

    Honda Fits' kill cyclists just as badly as SUV's. Although I'd say the most dangerous vehicles are the landscaping trucks with giant mirrors. And the vindictive drivers that like to get as close as possible. It's war out there. War against you.
    Also beware kids hassling you, I've had donuts, sodas, and waterballoons thrown at me.

  6. #6
    mad aussie
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    I commute a 39 mile round trip three days per week. I usually bring my clothes and other stuff in on Monday and then commute the other days. I commute on either a road bike or a fixie from a salvaged Tommasini.
    My tips:
    You cant have enough lights and reflective gear at night. I usually have reflective tape on my backpack, ankle bands and a front/rear flashing light. I also have lights for the handlebar ends.
    You need really tough tires as you cant always see or avoid debris. I use Maxxis Refuse tires with thorn resistant tubes and tire liners. Its heavy as hell, but it works.
    It is often a lot colder in the morning than heading home in the evening so have some layers that you can use to fine tune for both directions.
    Commuting is a great time to practice your trackstands.

    I find it to be good training, it saves me gas money, and somehow I feel a lot happier when I get to work than if I have been stuck in traffic in the car.

    Kevin

  7. #7
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    I commute 4-5 days per week in Tucson, 20 mi round trip, been hit twice in one month but never injured (except for my bike both times).

    Best bets:

    1. a good frame pump for those inevitable flats, mini pumps suck when it is dark, raining or windy.
    2. two good tubes for those inevitable double flats.
    3. 700x32c's for the roady for those inevitable rocks, tools, logs and potholes.
    4. a super bright blinky on back and with back up batteries at work just in case you leave it on all day and it is dead in the evening when you need it.
    5. uses your mountain bike headlight over any commuter light. Justify it by the fact that you spent $$$ on it and you should use it, It will save your life.
    6. Arm warmers, knee warmers, wool socks and a reflective vest are all good aquisitions.
    7. Thermal gloves or mitts are great until around Feb.
    8. Always carry a water bottle with water in it. Great for washing dust out of your eyes on windy days. Oh and drinking
    9. Clear lens for the ride home.
    10. A courier bag is good because its position on your back allows shoulder checks without interference.
    11. Always use the shoulder check versus a mirror, complacency kills on the road and the act of shoulder checking will give you more safety than the small viewpoint a mirror will give.
    12. Keep a patch kit at work, plus one in your bag (glueless patch are great for this) so if you flat you can patch at work and still have 2 tubes for the return trip.
    13. listen to cars, you can tell what they are doing by the sounds that they make, especially you can tell if they are slowing or speeding up which becomes critical when they are going to try to make the right turn ahead around you. Trust me on that one.
    14. commuting 5 days a week will make it very easy to not mountain bike on the weekend which is counter productive to ones mountain biking zen.
    15. Keep on top of the water drinking at work as it is easier to get dehydrated if you are commuting, especially here in AZ.
    15. Keep some gatorade or salt pills at work especially if you drink coffee or soda through out the day so that you aren't totally dehydrated on the ride home.

    Good luck and stay safe out there
    Last edited by rockcrusher; 12-12-2006 at 04:32 PM.
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  8. #8
    Kathleen in AZ
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    great advice by everyone!

    My only additional comments are to avoid the streets as much as possible by taking canals, trails, and sidewalks. But by doing this, you are guaranteed goatheads. Flats really really suck on the way to work because if you are anything like me, you are already running late. For both my fixie and mtn commuter bikes, I've had the best luck avoiding flats with Specialized Armadillo tires... they sell both the skinny and "fat" Armadillos at SMC. Fat is relative though as the mtbs are seriously skinny for around here but for commuting they are fine. Oh, another tip is that sandwich baggies over my socks before putting on my shoes allows me to get by with my mesh shoes in the winter. And finally, the Niterider Minute

    Edit: haha... I went out to the garage last night to see what the heck my new little commuter Niterider is called then never finished my last line above. It's not the Minute, it's the MiNewt. Small LED-only bar light that is great for commuting!! Zort used it on our last ThNR when his light wasn't working - it's not bersty for dirt, but will do in a pinch. I got tired of moving batteries and lights around all the time so I'm enjoying a dedicated commuter light. In fact, I'm riding to work today!! Should be a chilly one this am. brrrr... lots of layers, bags on toes, windstopper gloves and jacket will keep me warm.
    Last edited by DurtGurl; 12-13-2006 at 06:56 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jperson
    Drivers not looking, freeway crossings are seriously dangerous. Try to cross freeways at pedestrian bridges or non-car ramp bridges. Try to make eye contact with a driver waiting to turn in front of you. Use as many canals as you can, this is always my favorite part.

    Honda Fits' kill cyclists just as badly as SUV's. Although I'd say the most dangerous vehicles are the landscaping trucks with giant mirrors. And the vindictive drivers that like to get as close as possible. It's war out there. War against you.
    Also beware kids hassling you, I've had donuts, sodas, and waterballoons thrown at me.

    I'm okay with donuts. I'm okay.

  10. #10
    sprocket
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Wombat
    I commute a 39 mile round trip three days per week. I usually bring my clothes and other stuff in on Monday and then commute the other days. I commute on either a road bike or a fixie from a salvaged Tommasini.
    My tips:
    You cant have enough lights and reflective gear at night. I usually have reflective tape on my backpack, ankle bands and a front/rear flashing light. I also have lights for the handlebar ends.
    You need really tough tires as you cant always see or avoid debris. I use Maxxis Refuse tires with thorn resistant tubes and tire liners. Its heavy as hell, but it works.
    It is often a lot colder in the morning than heading home in the evening so have some layers that you can use to fine tune for both directions.
    Commuting is a great time to practice your trackstands.

    I find it to be good training, it saves me gas money, and somehow I feel a lot happier when I get to work than if I have been stuck in traffic in the car.

    Kevin



    Sage words.

  11. #11
    my knees hurt
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    I've only commuted to work a few times this year, its a long haul riding home after 9+ hours of work....the morning is fine but the ride home my commute goes up past Saguaro Lake, down Beeline, through Fountain Hills, Shea to Frank LW into Scottsdale Airpark....48 miles each way.

    I am hoping to get a Lemond Fillmore for a Xmas/future bday/anniversary gift though....not sure if I will be able to handle the commute on a fixie...yet, but I'm going to try....
    BELIEVE
    Imagine what you could achieve if you knew you would not fail.

  12. #12
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlespeedsycip
    I've only commuted to work a few times this year, its a long haul riding home after 9+ hours of work....the morning is fine but the ride home my commute goes up past Saguaro Lake, down Beeline, through Fountain Hills, Shea to Frank LW into Scottsdale Airpark....48 miles each way.

    I am hoping to get a Lemond Fillmore for a Xmas/future bday/anniversary gift though....not sure if I will be able to handle the commute on a fixie...yet, but I'm going to try....
    Wow Mark, that's a serious commute!! Choose to do it on a full-moon night and the ride home past Saguero will be magnificent!! A fixie would hurt.

  13. #13
    "Yabut"
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlespeedsycip
    I've only commuted to work a few times this year, its a long haul riding home after 9+ hours of work....the morning is fine but the ride home my commute goes up past Saguaro Lake, down Beeline, through Fountain Hills, Shea to Frank LW into Scottsdale Airpark....48 miles each way.

    I am hoping to get a Lemond Fillmore for a Xmas/future bday/anniversary gift though....not sure if I will be able to handle the commute on a fixie...yet, but I'm going to try....


    Holy Mole! Now THAT'S a commute! Mine is just a little easier...... 6miles, each way. 95%offroad. And, it only takes 5 minutes longer than driving.
    Sorry, don't mean to rub it in.

    ~Aaron~

  14. #14
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    Commuting is great. I agree with the others, you feel so much better at work. Be safe, watch for drivers. Assume they will do the worst.

    Have fun!

  15. #15
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    one more little thing

    Lots of excellent advice leaves little to add, but here's my contribution:

    Try to acknowlege any driver could have run you over but didn't because they were paying attention. Mostly you're thanking them for something they didn't do, like pulling out in front of you or changing into your lane. Less often it's for something they did do, like slowing down to avoid you.

    Do you owe it to them? Not really, but it is a cheap form of positive reinforcement. With children they call it catching them being good (barf). Whatever, they almost always wave back and hopefully the trivial gesture on your part can take the edge off the hard feelings some drivers have for bikers.

  16. #16
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    Lots of great info everybody. Thanks for the input. Now I just have to find a cheap rear wheel and I'll be golden. Or maybe I can talk the Mrs. into one of those cheap-o steel Nashbar frames and use my current wheelset that is being replaced on the main steed? Hmmm, that sounds like the best plan to me!
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder

    I find myself enjoying gravel more and more lately...

  17. #17
    Meatbomb
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    Ride with the flow of traffic !! I had some roadie appear in a crosswalk going against the flow the other day as I was making a left turn. He came out of nowhere and I had to stomp the brakes right in front of a BMW in order to not take him out. He had the nerve to flip me off.

  18. #18
    more beers, lees gears.
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    so how do you guys commute to work and not reek of sweat? Do you just ride slower? or do you have showers at work?

    When I ride my road bike i get my adrenaline and heart rate up so much from riding through intersections and riding hard, i smell pretty bad afterward.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattKHS
    so how do you guys commute to work and not reek of sweat? Do you just ride slower? or do you have showers at work?

    When I ride my road bike i get my adrenaline and heart rate up so much from riding through intersections and riding hard, i smell pretty bad afterward.
    i've got showers but before i had access i took a shower before i left home and did the sink-shower and used baby wipes when i got to work.

  20. #20
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo
    Ride with the flow of traffic !! I had some roadie appear in a crosswalk going against the flow the other day as I was making a left turn. He came out of nowhere and I had to stomp the brakes right in front of a BMW in order to not take him out. He had the nerve to flip me off.
    I stay on the east sidewalk of 48th St both to and from work, which means on the way home I'm going against the flow of traffic. Yea, it's illegal but I've had lots of cops drive right on by. I would not do this except that the west side of 48th St is downright scary especially at night so I stay to the east side. I just have to be really careful when crossing parking lot entrances and cross streets.... No one (and I really do mean no one) ever looks right when approaching the road from a parking lot or cross street. If you expect that behavior and watch your surroundings, you will be fine.

  21. #21

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    Commuting is more dangerous than it appears!!

    I commuted to school when I first moved to furnace(phx). Five miles down dobson. Then I got a concussion. Don't know what happened(i.e. retrograde and antrograde amnesia), bike was relatively ok and my face wasn't. My wife's(icu nurse) resonse was "is it worth it to commute to school and risk getting killed so that you can get in your environmental statement"? I normally would have shrugged this question off but it brought two things to mind. One, the day before, I forgot my helmet(1st time) and my helmet took a big part of the blow. If this happened a day earlier I would have been toast. Two, the main thing I like about cycling(mtnMTNMTN) is that it gets me away from cars and pavement. Nobody in their suv cares about bikes and sustainability, they are living in a city that was founded on the mis allocation and over indulgence of cheap energy. Build fast, flat and far, we'll commute! So, why would I want to make a statement by riding my bike down carfister dobson road to make a statement. No, I'll make a statement when school is over(7/07) by relocating to a place where there was some freeking sustainable(reasonable) urban planning involved and where I don't have to ride my bike through arterial(go nowhere)car hell.
    If your still determined,
    I don't know if this helps, choosing a frontage road like price(frontage road of the 101 for ex.) has been much better than dobson because there are fewer businesses and cars pulling out and into your way.

    Good luck and here is a shot of why it doesn't pay to commute in a place with no pedestrian cooridors.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  22. #22
    more beers, lees gears.
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    so did you get hit my a car? no memory of it at all?

    How was the bike? Driver stop? did their insurance cover anything?

  23. #23

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    I don't have any recollection of before or after(post 1hr or so) ie retro(before)and antro(after)amnesia(cerebral syntac error ok). The picture displays the majority of the physical harm that I encountered. My bike seat got ripped and and bent up. My hndlbrs got jingused (messed up). Honestly don't know what happened beyond what I have told you. Maybe I swerved to avoid a car pulling in front of me? Really don't know. Got a good reality check. On the road it doesn't matter how good or safe of a bike rider you are and that little white line in the bike lane is hardly a containment barracade to keep biker and car seperated. In the woods you can count on the trees staying where they belong(with the exception of lightning strikes, hurricane force wind storms, flash floods and avalanches), not the same with cars in the bike lane.

  24. #24
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    sorry, double post.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB
    OK, I'm going to start commuting to work this week. I'll be on the roadie until I can get a cheap set of wheels for the commuter. I'd rather have the road gearing but the security of the mtb commuter....plus, I'd rather the commuter get stolen than the roadie...if that were to happen.

    So, anyone else bike commute to work? How do you like it? What's been your biggest problem? I'll have a ride of 14 miles and plan to chill in the mornings and hammer it home. Great training for the OP too!
    Wheels - what do you do to prevent wheel theft?

    My current commuter is an old mtb with solid axles (with nuts), so that's been enough to deter theft, but I need to replace my wheels soon, and I'm wondering if I need to go to the trouble of replacing QR axles with nutted axles? It seems like a pain to carry a cable lock long enough to secure both wheels, but I don't want to deal with the hassle of going to the bike to ride home and it's missing one or both wheels...

    I do the same as you plan to, cruise in to work with the least amount of sweating, ride harder on the way home if I feel like it (sometimes take a longer route too).

  26. #26
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    Risk

    Quote Originally Posted by brapbrap
    I don't have any recollection of before or after(post 1hr or so) ie retro(before)and antro(after)amnesia(cerebral syntac error ok). The picture displays the majority of the physical harm that I encountered. My bike seat got ripped and and bent up. My hndlbrs got jingused (messed up). Honestly don't know what happened beyond what I have told you. Maybe I swerved to avoid a car pulling in front of me? Really don't know. Got a good reality check. On the road it doesn't matter how good or safe of a bike rider you are and that little white line in the bike lane is hardly a containment barracade to keep biker and car seperated. In the woods you can count on the trees staying where they belong(with the exception of lightning strikes, hurricane force wind storms, flash floods and avalanches), not the same with cars in the bike lane.
    It's all in the amount of risk we're willing to take. Everyone has their own comfort level and reasons why they commute by bike or by car. I do it because I like to ride my bike and hate sitting in traffic. Sure, a good benefit is that there is one less car and one less road-raging jackass.

    You can pretty much replace "bike" with "car" and "rider" with "driver" in your post and have the same injuries, damage, etc.

  27. #27

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    Well there is a buzzword in the adventure education industry called "perceived risk" . That for me has changed. Esp. after seeing a friend in flagstaff become paralyzed by a car and another flag local getting seriously hurt. That kind of **** doesn't happen when I go on a big epic ride in the woods. When I am not surrounded by cars my "perceived risk" is a little different cause I know I am in charge of my own fate(at least to the extent of inducing paralysis through trauma). This is not the case when your on the road with cars(are coffins). They can swoop in and get ya. I am not willing to risk my ability to frolic in the woods as an able bodied human for a 5 mile commute down deathly dobson. Instead I'll take a "risk" and move somewhere else. Maybe somewhere that has urban pedestrian corridors that are safe and don't have flipping traffic lights and daytona 500 starting lines every mile. You can liberate yourself through bike riding in non threatening environments too. Have a safe holiday.

  28. #28

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    I commute round trip to work 6 miles a day (3-5 times per week), on a Trek 3700 (all stock). I have a front light and rear light I bought for $5 each from the “Deals Thread” that work great for the commute. They get you noticed and that’s what matters to me. I also have front and rear reflectors, wheel reflectors, and I wear a windbreaker with reflective stripe and a reflective belt, helmet, gloves, etc.

    One street I travel on has no bike lane, and no street lights, the other I ride on the sidewalk, and the last is up McDowell in the bike lane. I’ve almost gotten crushed once in the cross walk (my right of way) by some idiot half asleep at 6:30am while he’s making a right turn from the opposite intersection, with no clue to the world. Now when I approach a cross walk I make eye contact with the drivers at all the turning points for the intersection, and I stare down the driver who is about to make the right turn when the light changes and I go to cross.

    I like the commute, when I get to work I have a gym, showers, and locker room waiting for me, I feel good, and get a workout at the same time. Yes you have to look out for the other guy, but sometimes you never know what’s going to happen, you risk getting in your car and you risk getting on your bike, and some of us risk at our jobs, bottom line if your not willing to take the risk, don’t put yourself in the position. It’s not a bad thing as long as you feel safe; I’d rather have someone feel safe in a car then be paranoid riding their bike with traffic…

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Show Time
    One street I travel on has no bike lane, and no street lights, the other I ride on the sidewalk, and the last is up McDowell in the bike lane. I’ve almost gotten crushed once in the cross walk (my right of way) by some idiot half asleep at 6:30am while he’s making a right turn from the opposite intersection, with no clue to the world.
    Just to be clear, if you are riding your bike in the crosswalk, you have given-up right of way as it is illegal in most cities in the valley (but not all). So the burden is on you. Drivers don't anticipate bikes in the crosswalk so you must assume every car does not see you and will hit you.
    That said there are times when there is no better option. Just ride defensively.

  30. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by YuriB
    Just to be clear, if you are riding your bike in the crosswalk, you have given-up right of way as it is illegal in most cities in the valley (but not all). So the burden is on you. Drivers don't anticipate bikes in the crosswalk so you must assume every car does not see you and will hit you.
    That said there are times when there is no better option. Just ride defensively.
    We'll thats good to know, maybe he was aiming for me then. I don't think he would have noticed me on foot if I decided to run that morning, he was just making his left turn without a care in the world...

  31. #31
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    My commuter is my 1983 Nishiki. Singlespeed (44:16) with canti brakes and 35c tires. It'll cruise at about 22mph and can make the towers on the Summit Rd on SoMo. I've done a couple of centuries on it (Taylor House Century in Flagstaff and White Mountain Tour-all the way to NM... in the rain!, to name a few.) and am planning to do the Casa Grande century and quite possibly the STP.

    The fat tires take a lot of the road vibrations away, as do the Bontrager Buzzkill inserts and the triple wrapped wide drop bar.

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    Wow, interesting posts!

  33. #33

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    Wow, interesting posts!

  34. #34
    Something goes here...
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    So I did my first commute today from the new house. It's 14 miles one way and wouldn't ya know it, a woman in a Suburban was turning left and had to stop in the middle of the intersection to avoid hitting me. I made eye contact with her and everything. And of course, I had to swerve into a patch of gravel so I couldn't stop. If she wouldn't have stopped, I'd have been hit...not very hard as she was barely moving but hit nonetheless. And it would have been right on her grill so she'd have seen the whole thing. I had the right of way so I would have had a new ride...along with some broken bones I'm sure!

    Anyway, this won't deter me from continuing to commute...however, I'm really looking forward to fatter tires and disc brakes!
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder

    I find myself enjoying gravel more and more lately...

  35. #35
    more beers, lees gears.
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    Yeah, fatter tires will help. I work from home, so I really only commute to the post office daily and the bank every 2 or 3 days. I prefer my mountain bike. I can hop a curb, ride through some dirt, and react more quickly than on my roadie.

    I just air up my Specialized Fast track pros to 75psi and can still hold 18 - 22mph.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB
    So I did my first commute today from the new house. It's 14 miles one way and wouldn't ya know it, a woman in a Suburban was turning left and had to stop in the middle of the intersection to avoid hitting me. I made eye contact with her and everything. And of course, I had to swerve into a patch of gravel so I couldn't stop. If she wouldn't have stopped, I'd have been hit...not very hard as she was barely moving but hit nonetheless. And it would have been right on her grill so she'd have seen the whole thing. I had the right of way so I would have had a new ride...along with some broken bones I'm sure!

    Anyway, this won't deter me from continuing to commute...however, I'm really looking forward to fatter tires and disc brakes!
    Eye contact is big - I hate cars with dark-tinted front windows so you can't be sure if the driver even sees you. (not to mention cops can't see if there is a gun pointed at them)

  37. #37
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    I'm not working this weekend. If you want to borrow my commuter, you're more than welcome. It seems like everyone who tries it, builds up one.


    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB
    So I did my first commute today from the new house. It's 14 miles one way and wouldn't ya know it, a woman in a Suburban was turning left and had to stop in the middle of the intersection to avoid hitting me. I made eye contact with her and everything. And of course, I had to swerve into a patch of gravel so I couldn't stop. If she wouldn't have stopped, I'd have been hit...not very hard as she was barely moving but hit nonetheless. And it would have been right on her grill so she'd have seen the whole thing. I had the right of way so I would have had a new ride...along with some broken bones I'm sure!

    Anyway, this won't deter me from continuing to commute...however, I'm really looking forward to fatter tires and disc brakes!

  38. #38
    Something goes here...
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    I'm picking up a Nashbar frame to throw my extra parts on and my old set of disc brakes. Thanks but I'll be good in a few weeks. I just wish I wouldn't haev sold my 1992 Fisher Paragon full rigid that I rode on the STP twice! That was a great bike and the perfect commuter. Oh well, live and learn.

    You should hit Black Canyon with us Sunday!
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder

    I find myself enjoying gravel more and more lately...

  39. #39
    fear this
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    Although I don't live in Tucson anymore and I never commuted via bike to work there, I commute to work in Vancouver, BC. I live and work downtown, so the overall commute is short - a little over 1 mile. Vancouver has designed and/or modified existing ones to accomodate bike lanes, bike accessible crossing signals, and also allowed bikes to travel on buses, light rail, and commuter rail systems. Riding to work in downtown Vancouver is obviously riding through urban jungle - curb hopping is a skill you have to master quickly and since it rains consistently out here, bike control at high speeds in the wet is also paramount. I find that there's lots of neat little shorcuts through the city which make the ride fun, including stair drops and at least one jump. The cold never gets to you since you're pedaling and generating heat anyway, but when it snows and turns to ice, riding can be a real PITA. Mind you, snow in Vancouver is a rarity indeed. Only a hair more frequent than snow in Tucson. The biggest problem I've had is dodging pedestrians that are crossing the road at the wrong time and cars that simply fail to acknowledge your existence. As previously mentioned however, shoulder checking is a must and like my motorcycle instructor once told me, "Ride like you're invisible to the bastards!" I exclusively ride my Sugar since it accomodates fenders and is far more nimble than the Ollie.
    Norco Torrent FS
    Devinci Ollie
    Commencal Meta HT AM chromoly

  40. #40
    ravingbikefiend
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    Parking your car and cyclo-commuting is an excellent choice for so many reasons...it's healthful, reduces stress, and makes a much reduced environmental impact than does an automobile.

    In my old job I had a 5 km urban commute and was also able to use my commuter to handle all the travelling I had to do in my workday (30 km ++ ) while my new job keeps me in one place but has a 13 km trip that is 90% MUTS, trails, and singletrack.

    I think folks already covered all the essentials one needs to have an enjoyable commute and it just comes down to personal choice as to what one chooses to ride.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

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