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  1. #1
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    Close call with a Rattlesnake

    Went out for a ride this AM at McDowell and I headed out the Sport Loop. Just pass "The Burner" section, I was heading down to the bottom of one of the gullys when I see a rattlesnake stretched across the trail right in front of me. I was able to bunny hop over him and then stopped to go back and take a quick picture of him. As I approached him, his rattle was going full speed and he was in the striking position and he was super PISSED! He was sitting right on the side of the trail and I was concerned that he might strike at the next biker to come by. So, I decided to hang out to warn any riders until he moved away from the trail. I waited for about 10 mins and this guy was not going anywhere and was still rattling away and in the striking position right on the side of the trail. I tried moving out of his line of sight for a while to see if he would calm down and move away. After about 30 minutes of trying this, the snake was still not going away and still ready to strike. I decided to call the Park on my cell and see what they recommended that I do. I talked to Rand and he decide to drive out to the area and move the snake away from the trail. Just as Rand was getting to the area, a biker came over the hill towards the snake. I was able to stop the biker before the snake and it ended up being my friend and 24 hr of Fury teammate, Gianna. Small world!! Rand moved the snake away from the trail and informed us that the reason the snake was so aggressive was because it was a Mojave Rattlesnake and it is one of the most dangerous species of rattlesnakes around. Be careful out there!

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    Marty

  2. #2
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    I've seen quite a few Mohave's at McDowell. On Saturday my husband actually ran over a Mohave on the long loop...and on Sunday he was on Pemberton and almost ran another one as he blew by. He thinks it was the same one laying in wait to retaliate for Saturday's bump. They're green which makes them easy to identify.

    Glad no people or snakes were harmed!

  3. #3
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    Mojaves are not green CATO. They tint brown to slight grey depending on surroundings. They carry a bite filled with both neurotoxin (attacks central nervous system), as well as the hemotoxin (attacks blood cells). All other rattlesnakes in US have only Hemotoxin. Mojave rattlesnakes are quick to be identified by tail markings, when white bands are larger than black bands near rattle (as seen in picture). Heads are also smaller and more pointed than western diamondback but difficult to tell except by herpetologist.

  4. #4
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    Probably hadn't had that morning coffee yet. I'd be grumpy too
    Desert Sunset Calls/Upward, Pain, Perseverance/Welcome Solitude

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by YT
    Mojaves are not green CATO. They tint brown to slight grey depending on surroundings. They carry a bite filled with both neurotoxin (attacks central nervous system), as well as the hemotoxin (attacks blood cells). All other rattlesnakes in US have only Hemotoxin. Mojave rattlesnakes are quick to be identified by tail markings, when white bands are larger than black bands near rattle (as seen in picture). Heads are also smaller and more pointed than western diamondback but difficult to tell except by herpetologist.
    Wiki:
    "The color varies from shades of brown to pale green depending on the surroundings. The green hue found among Mojave rattlesnakes has led to them being known as "Mojave greens" in some areas."

    Looks green to me.

  6. #6
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    This guy did have a greenish tint, the white & black bands around tail and a very bad attitude.

    I have never seen a rattlesnake be as aggressive as this one.
    Marty

  7. #7
    YT
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    Yes they are commonly known as "Mojave greens" because of the color deception. Up close these snakes are not green, more to a pale yellow with crossing pattern of brown. It is also called green toxin, which is also incorrect.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by YT
    Yes they are commonly known as "Mojave greens" because of the color deception. Up close these snakes are not green, more to a pale yellow with crossing pattern of brown. It is also called green toxin, which is also incorrect.

    Don't care to look at a Mojave close up, so I'll stick with Green. Thx.

  9. #9
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    frickin mojave's- only snake i've had come at me. like chase me. i've captured a bunch of rattlesnakes and even had a few as pets, but not mojaves- they're so aggressive.

  10. #10
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    Umm...
    Move it yourself??
    damn...

    (glad no one was hurt - but damn, 30+mins?) sheesh)
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
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    Marty, there are some out there that don't like your "hey like everybody" attitude . You just came across one that didn't !

    Maybe if you gave him a beer he would ave liked you better, it works on me *cough* nokons *cough* .

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    Umm...
    Move it yourself??
    damn...

    (glad no one was hurt - but damn, 30+mins?) sheesh)
    Thanks, but I do not have any experience with handling rattlesnakes and did not feel this was the time to try and learn. One mistake and it could cost you a lot!

    I will wait the 30+ mins again next time.

    Brian - I could have swore that I dropped off some tasty beverages for you on that one. Are you going to be at the 24 hrs of Fury?
    Marty

  13. #13
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    So what happens if you actually get bit? How long do you have? Obviously you make a phone call to 911 but should you try to get out of the park? Sit tight? What if you don't have a phone with you?
    "Because I was profiling and it looked stolen.
    90% of everything in my neighborhood is stolen." - Me

  14. #14
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    Yikes. I don't know what I would do in that situation to get the snake to move. I probably would have tried standing back a few yards and throwing big rocks at it...but I don't know what a snake does when rocks start landing on it. Most animals will retreat.

    Thx...Doug

  15. #15
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    Mojaves are the nastiest and deadliest of rattlesnakes. They have been known to chase people. I saw a dead one at Starr Pass last year that was lime green, far greener than any I'd seen.
    Usually I'll use the bike as a weapon and bounce it between me and the trail to scare it off but with a Mojave it's doubtful it would move away. Have picked up rattlers with a long handled shovel when a landscaper to get it off clients properties but the bigger they are more they resist being moved. Often it would slide off the shovel so I'd smack the ground in front of it till it would retreat.
    agmtb

  16. #16
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    I've been told to squirt it with your water bottle. That usually scares them away.
    “Keep your blood clean, your body lean, and your mind sharp.”

    Henry Rollins

  17. #17
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    I made something mad in the bushes alongside the trail last night in the dark on 1A/PMP. Didn't stop to find out what it was. Kinda gave me the heebie jeebies for the rest of the ride but was glad he just gave me a warning.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcoplea
    Thanks, but I do not have any experience with handling rattlesnakes and did not feel this was the time to try and learn. One mistake and it could cost you a lot!

    I will wait the 30+ mins again next time.

    Brian - I could have swore that I dropped off some tasty beverages for you on that one. Are you going to be at the 24 hrs of Fury?

    Beverages? Yes you did . I might roll out there to hang out, not sure yet though.

  19. #19
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    I've seen a few this year, but one that stands out...

    was on Desert Classic about a month ago. Riding after work, it was still hot but the sun was behind the mountains. About a quarter mile past the watertank, right before the trail splits off right to go down secret, a rattler was in a creosote bush about two feet off the ground, right off the trail. And he was pissed off. I heard him before I saw him.

    I've never seen one up in a bush like that before. I wonder if he was going after a bird or something.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcoplea
    Thanks, but I do not have any experience with handling rattlesnakes and did not feel this was the time to try and learn....
    gotta learn sometime!
    master this skill and the ladies will swoon for you
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcoplea
    Went out for a ride this AM at McDowell and I headed out the Sport Loop. Just pass "The Burner" section, I was heading down to the bottom of one of the gullys when I see a rattlesnake stretched across the trail right in front of me. I was able to bunny hop over him and then stopped to go back and take a quick picture of him. As I approached him, his rattle was going full speed and he was in the striking position and he was super PISSED! He was sitting right on the side of the trail and I was concerned that he might strike at the next biker to come by. So, I decided to hang out to warn any riders until he moved away from the trail. I waited for about 10 mins and this guy was not going anywhere and was still rattling away and in the striking position right on the side of the trail. I tried moving out of his line of sight for a while to see if he would calm down and move away. After about 30 minutes of trying this, the snake was still not going away and still ready to strike. I decided to call the Park on my cell and see what they recommended that I do. I talked to Rand and he decide to drive out to the area and move the snake away from the trail. Just as Rand was getting to the area, a biker came over the hill towards the snake. I was able to stop the biker before the snake and it ended up being my friend and 24 hr of Fury teammate, Gianna. Small world!! Rand moved the snake away from the trail and informed us that the reason the snake was so aggressive was because it was a Mojave Rattlesnake and it is one of the most dangerous species of rattlesnakes around. Be careful out there!
    That's almost at the exact same point I saw my first rattler out there. It was during the Adrenalin race, and there was a big sucker coiled on the side of the trail, full rattle. I'm sure plenty of cyclists rode by him.

    My personal closest encounter was about 3-4 years ago out in PMP, during a night ride. Got a flat, and sat down on a rock bench to change it. I don't know his name (Mike?), but a rider who rides with his Jack Russell came upon us, and the dog started sniffing under where I was sitting. As soon as he did, I heard the rattle. I must have been sitting on the snake for 5 mins.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  22. #22
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    Good photos MCO. Yep, I have had similar close encounters on the MMP Long Loop. I have never run over one, but came close at Convict Corner back in July. Most aggressive snake I ever encountered was water moccasin (aka cottonmouth) back in Texas. They are so mean that red tail hawks don't even like going after them. True story, I once saw a red tail hawk swerve at the last minute to avoid grabbing a cottonmouth that was crawling across a mud flat. Amazing wild kingdom moment.

    Bob
    "Some people follow their dreams, others hunt them down and beat them mercilessly into submission." - Neil Kendall

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by hfy108
    So what happens if you actually get bit? How long do you have? Obviously you make a phone call to 911 but should you try to get out of the park? Sit tight? What if you don't have a phone with you?
    You want to keep the bite lower than your heart and seek medical attention. 30 minutes is the preferred time. However, moving quickly speeds up the flow of the venom so it's better if someone else can hike you out. Do not try to suck the poison out (old wives tale) and don't apply a tourniquet.

    You could also try lopping off the bitten limb with your multi-tool, but that is time-consuming and messy.

  24. #24
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    Anyone have a listing of the numbers to the different ranger stations. Might be a good idea to list them and get them in our phones.
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

  25. #25
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    so sit on your bike and have a buddy role you out?

  26. #26
    I am Walt
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    Quote Originally Posted by hfy108
    So what happens if you actually get bit? How long do you have? Obviously you make a phone call to 911 but should you try to get out of the park? Sit tight? What if you don't have a phone with you?
    Quote Originally Posted by crispy
    You want to keep the bite lower than your heart and seek medical attention. 30 minutes is the preferred time. However, moving quickly speeds up the flow of the venom so it's better if someone else can hike you out. Do not try to suck the poison out (old wives tale) and don't apply a tourniquet.
    If you get bit by a rattler on the trail (or anywhere), it is a very dangerous situation. Unlike other creatures whose bites hurt like hell, but have no lasting impact, a rattlesnake bite can kill, or permanently damage you, if you are not treated very quickly, and within 30-60 minutes sounds about right.

    I don't know all the specifics, but as crispy says, try to keep your heart rate down (yeah, right...you just got BIT by a RATTLESNAKE!), call for/get to help, and do NOT apply a tourniquet or try to suck out the venom. If you aren't near a trailhead and a vehicle, then call 911 and request a chopper. Seriously. You need HELP FAST.

    I have thought through what I would do, and it goes something like this:
    1. Scream like hell
    2. Kill the f-ing snake (Question: Should you keep/bring the dead snake so the medical people can see what bit you?)
    3. Scream some more
    4. Assess my location: Am I close enough to ride out and get to my car within 15 mins or so at an easy pace (to keep HR down), or not?
    5. Scream some more
    6. Call 911 (hopefully you have a signal...good luck if you have Sprint) and tell them what happened, and that you are riding out to a TH and need medical help to meet you there (you won't have time to drive to a hospital), or that you are too far away from any TH or road, and need a med-evac chopper to come get you (Note: I hope they bring the bike too)
    7. Scream some more
    8. Wait or start to pedal out slowly

    Hmmm...in retrospect, perhaps all that screaming wouldn't be good for the HR...but I'd feel better...

    But overall, you are seriously f-cked if bitten. It is a bad situation any way you slice it.

    Hey IBIKEAZ (Scott, who works on a med-evac chopper), ever evac any rattlesnake bite victims? What do you think?

    EDIT: Always, always, always ride with a phone. You just never know. Hfy108, if you don't have a phone with you, take off and make a run for the TH or car, and make sure you're carrying ID so they can identify your body...
    Last edited by waltaz; 10-01-2009 at 12:36 PM.

  27. #27
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    Really Walt? I thought your standard MO was to get mad, turn green, rip your clothes and then run off...

    "Nobody ever told me not to try" - Curious George Soundtrack by Jack Johnson

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noelg
    Really Walt? I thought your standard MO was to get mad, turn green, rip your clothes and then run off...

    Yes...EXCEPT for rattlesnake bites...then I scream...

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by barny7
    I've been told to squirt it with your water bottle. That usually scares them away.
    The flow from my hydration pack is pretty weak, snake would probably just get a drink.
    agmtb

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    gotta learn sometime!
    master this skill and the ladies will swoon for you
    right... i get a "talkin' to" everytime i pick one up from my lady. "why do you have to do that?! that's stupid and dangerous. do you have to always pick them up? i wish you would stop. its juvenile."

    whattdya know, i'm still picking them up. i'm such a bad boy.

  31. #31
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    I really didn't need to read this thread......

    I'm all freaked out now.

    I've lived in Arizona most of my life and RARELY see a snake. I go riding in Boulder, Colorado this past July and see one. I got to the top of this climb and get off of the bike to sit and catch my breath, next thing I know, I hear rattling 4 feet from me....scared the hell out of me. Suddenly, I wasn't so tired anymore.

    I hate snakes.

  32. #32
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    A friend of mine got tagged a few weeks ago my a Mohave while hiking. He was lucky to make it back to his car and have cell coverage. He spent a few days in the ICU and a few more in the hospital.
    He is also the only person I've ever know who has been bitten by a snake and he wasn't even drunk. As far as I know.

    His account:


    Gents - back at home and the recovery has been speedy thus far. I was barely capable of walking on monday, using crutches on tuesday and I am more or less free of crutches today. My leg is still twice the size that it should be and due to being able to put pressure on it, it is actually larger than the pics below. About 5 hrs after the bite, my stomach swelled out 6 inches, my balls were literally the size of a grapefruit (I have Trashy and Sadow as witness) and I could not move my leg - zero feeling in it for 5 days. When I could get up - or when I was forced to, I could not bend at the waste more than 15 degrees, so the bathroom was a chore, showers were not happening and I generally could not take care of myself. The swelling of stomach, side and back have subsided a bunch but bruising is still there. It is remarkable in my mind that a bite to the thigh would leave a bruise like that on my back. As severe a bite as this was, I am one lucky guy to still have my leg, much less my life. I am enrolled in a UofA anti-venom study - its purpose is to get FDA approval for a new anti-venom - which I probably received, but its a blind study. I went to see the head of the study today, talked shop for a while, they took more blood (I have had IVs and blood drawn constantly), I am in good shape as far as the blood work is concerned - they were actually really impressed with my blood work - so that is a great sign.





    This is just need to know information: Am i supposed to enjoy the irony or pity the sincerity?

  33. #33
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    Was riding Pima and Dynamite about 10 yrs ago, came around a blind corner fast, and there was one stretched out across the trail. Instinctively hit the brakes hard, locked up and went over the bars. Landed almost on top of him. That was the quickest I ever got up from an endo. Snake just slowly moved away. Was cool that AM, and I think he was sluggish. Know a guy who did the same thing a few years later, and ruptured his eye when he landed on a rock(face first). Since that encounter I've rolled over several, with no consequenses except pissing off the snake. Keep your eyes open, they will be out in force the next few weeks with the cooler weather.

  34. #34
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Quote Originally Posted by DocRock
    Keep your eyes open, they will be out in force the next few weeks with the cooler weather.
    Don't they go into hibernation soon also?
    Currently at Mayo Clinic being tested for a kidney transplant. Donors welcome.

  35. #35
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    Wow, Yuri! Sorry to hear about your friend and I wish him a speedy and full recovery. Do you know the story of how he got bit?

    DocRock; it was most likely a western diamondback that you encountered. It tends to take a lot to get them pissed off and they are more interested in just getting away from people.

    They do go in hibernation soon, but are out a lot right now trying to fatten up for their long hibernation.
    Marty

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noelg
    Really Walt? I thought your standard MO was to get mad, turn green, rip your clothes and then run off...
    hahaha, me thought da same thing!!
    "If God is your co-pilot you're in the wrong seat!" S Barrington

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    Yikes. I don't know what I would do in that situation to get the snake to move. I probably would have tried standing back a few yards and throwing big rocks at it...but I don't know what a snake does when rocks start landing on it. Most animals will retreat.
    Thx...Doug
    i tried that - with smaller rocks - at hawes one time. the stupid thing was coiled in the middle of the very narrow uH to saddleback T. the rocks and twigs made the ratler madder and madder but it wouldn't budge! i even tried pushing my bike from behind to where it almost touched it. no go! so with bike over shoulder i gingerly walked around it giving it a good 8-10 feet clearance.
    "If God is your co-pilot you're in the wrong seat!" S Barrington

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by YuriB
    A friend of mine got tagged a few weeks ago my a Mohave while hiking. He was lucky to make it back to his car and have cell coverage.
    Yuri - How far did he have to go to get back to his car? How long did it take him to get medical care, and how long before he got the anti-venom?

  39. #39
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    *covering my ears and going LA LA LA LA LA LA LA LA!*

    Denial is a beautiful thing.
    "People do not lack strength; they lack will" (Victor Hugo)

  40. #40
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    I see rattlers all of the time, usually 2-3 times a month. I ride 2-3 times a week for a couple hours before dusk year round. This year I saw the same snake in the same place two days in a row in the Phoenix Mountain Preserves. IMO the best thing to do if you see one on the trail is to bunny hop if you can but just keep riding. Don't hit the brakes. One time at Pima and Dynamite I surprised one on an uphill that was coiled behind a rock. I heard a loud THWAP and something hit my back wheel. I looked back and there was a five footer stretched out across the trail. THAT is why I don't like night riding. Every other stick and root looks like a snake. And the rest are snakes.

  41. #41
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    yep, they will be out in force. They are trying to fatten up for the long nap. There will be a lot of snakes out for awhile.If you ride in the desert very long, you will have hopefully just a close call. I fell off the bike next to one and it was striking at me, it missed and I rolled away kicking and screaming like a little girl. I went back home.
    "I tried to live always free and above board like you" Cool Hand Luke

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by SiO2
    I see rattlers all of the time, usually 2-3 times a month. I ride 2-3 times a week for a couple hours before dusk year round. This year I saw the same snake in the same place two days in a row in the Phoenix Mountain Preserves. IMO the best thing to do if you see one on the trail is to bunny hop if you can but just keep riding. Don't hit the brakes. One time at Pima and Dynamite I surprised one on an uphill that was coiled behind a rock. I heard a loud THWAP and something hit my back wheel. I looked back and there was a five footer stretched out across the trail. THAT is why I don't like night riding. Every other stick and root looks like a snake. And the rest are snakes.
    Great post, ha ha! Had more close encounters this year in NW AZ, than in the last 10 years I've lived in Arizona. Night trailrides scare the H out of me, I am very worried about another encounter with a rattlesnake.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcoplea
    Just as Rand was getting to the area, a biker came over the hill towards the snake. I was able to stop the biker before the snake and it ended up being my friend and 24 hr of Fury teammate, Gianna. Small world!!
    I met her a year ago on Lost Dog...what did she think about the snake?

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    I met her a year ago on Lost Dog...what did she think about the snake?
    Gianna was very thankful that I warned her before she got to the snake. Julie P. was also riding with Gianna and came down the trail shortly behind her. Julie stated that she usually just moved the snakes off the trail herself and she tought that I was a Wus for not just moving the snake off the trail myself. :-)
    Marty

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcoplea
    Gianna was very thankful that I warned her before she got to the snake. Julie P. was also riding with Gianna and came down the trail shortly behind her. Julie stated that she usually just moved the snakes off the trail herself and she tought that I was a Wus for not just moving the snake off the trail myself. :-)

    A live Wus Pimp is better than a dead Manly Pimp !

  46. #46
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    I talked myselft out of a solo night ride on Wednesday b/c I starting thinking too much about the snakes this time of year....now this thread will probably cancel any night ride aspirations for next week too.....
    Salvation Outdoor
    "Take it Outside...Again!!!"

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunsetrider
    ...I fell off the bike next to one and it was striking at me, it missed and I rolled away kicking and screaming like a little girl. I went back home.
    That's funny, think I'd likely do the exact same! Glad it missed you!

  48. #48
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    Please don't throw rocks at the snakes. You are riding through their habitat/territory. Come on people, we live in a freagin desert. Have to expect to see some of the native wildlife time to time. If you don't know how to move it , or don't feel comfortable doing so, then just keep peddling. If you do see someone while you're peddling, give em a heads up. Always carry a cell phone in case of ANY type of an emergency. Of course riding in groups will usually guarantee that you will make it back to the parking lot even if it's not in one piece. Have you ever seen one of those goofy looking road runner birds? They love to eat snakes, including the rattling kind.
    It's only skin, it'll grow back!!

    Save the drama for your mama!!!

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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPIDERS
    Please don't throw rocks at the snakes. You are riding through their habitat/territory. Come on people, we live in a freagin desert. Have to expect to see some of the native wildlife time to time. If you don't know how to move it , or don't feel comfortable doing so, then just keep peddling. If you do see someone while you're peddling, give em a heads up. Always carry a cell phone in case of ANY type of an emergency. Of course riding in groups will usually guarantee that you will make it back to the parking lot even if it's not in one piece. Have you ever seen one of those goofy looking road runner birds? They love to eat snakes, including the rattling kind.

    The problem is those Road Runners don't like to ride in the camelbak very well, and they tend to scratch and peck when you try to help them out with a free meal .

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by AzSpeedfreek
    The problem is those Road Runners don't like to ride in the camelbak very well, and they tend to scratch and peck when you try to help them out with a free meal .
    Actually if you raise em right, they can help your flow on the trails...
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    It's only skin, it'll grow back!!

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  51. #51
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    I have Rands phone number but do you have a phone number to call a road runner?
    Just a bald guy biking the blubber away

    Scott
    Gilbert, AZ

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPIDERS
    Please don't throw rocks at the snakes. You are riding through their habitat/territory. Come on people, we live in a freagin desert. Have to expect to see some of the native wildlife time to time. If you don't know how to move it , or don't feel comfortable doing so, then just keep peddling. If you do see someone while you're peddling, give em a heads up. Always carry a cell phone in case of ANY type of an emergency. Of course riding in groups will usually guarantee that you will make it back to the parking lot even if it's not in one piece. Have you ever seen one of those goofy looking road runner birds? They love to eat snakes, including the rattling kind.
    Yes it is their natural habitat but we ride mountain bikes in the habitat now and we are higher on the food chain and tend to be brighter than snakes. I do not condone hurting the snake but as far as throwing rocks at it to get it to move along I see no problem with that. When I read this that was the first thing I thought "why not go back 15*30 feet and start throwing rocks at the general area until the snake moves." I have to think it would move in short order if you were aggressive enough although others have stated the Mohave Rattler is more stubborn and aggressive.

    I hope I don't have this situation happen to me but if it does I will try to pummel it with rocks.

  53. #53
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    Another note, Some people feel that they need to kill every rattle snake they see. The Mohave rattlesnake is a protected species and therefore illegal to kill.
    Just a bald guy biking the blubber away

    Scott
    Gilbert, AZ

  54. #54
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    A few months ago I had a real close call while hiking South Mountain. I came up on it so fast that I didn't see it, and it struck out at me. It only missed me by a few inches, but at least it missed me. The suck thing was that he was right in the middle of a narrow section of trail with no way to bypass the area. I tried throwing/rolling rocks at it, and the effer just wouldn't move. After about 10 minutes I remembered a technique that Marty Stoufer showed on Wild America. I held my Camelbak above my head, and started to sway left & right - kind of like birds do when they are being 'menacing'. The effect was immediate - the snake literally took off for the nearest bush as fast as it could. Of course my wife was laughing at me the entire time because I looked like a moron

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by ruzz
    Yes it is their natural habitat but we ride mountain bikes in the habitat now and we are higher on the food chain and tend to be brighter than snakes. I do not condone hurting the snake but as far as throwing rocks at it to get it to move along I see no problem with that. When I read this that was the first thing I thought "why not go back 15*30 feet and start throwing rocks at the general area until the snake moves." I have to think it would move in short order if you were aggressive enough although others have stated the Mohave Rattler is more stubborn and aggressive.

    I hope I don't have this situation happen to me but if it does I will try to pummel it with rocks.
    My story was getting a little long winded, so I did not include every little detail from my encounter. But, I did attempt to toss rocks at the snake to try to get it to move away from the trail. First, I tossed 3 or 4 rocks right beside it and that just pissed him off all the more. Then, I tried rolling a few rocks into him (kinda like bowling for snakes) and that also just pissed him off all the more. My intent was only to encourage him to move and not harm the snake. I too believe that we should not harm wild animals in their environment just because we run across them. However, the movjave rattlesnake is a very dangerous species and is VERY aggressive. Even when the Park Ranger was moving it with the snake pole, the rattlesnake went very aggressively at the ranger and did not retreat at all.

    I do not encourage anyone to needlessly harm wildlife. But after my encounter, YuriB's story about his friend and doing a little research on the very aggressive and dangerous mojave rattlesnake, I do not condemn anyone that chooses to kill this particular snake.
    Marty

  56. #56
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    Marty Stoufer/Wild America = Best nature show EVER... I miss being a kid and watching those!

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by swarga
    Another note, Some people feel that they need to kill every rattle snake they see. The Mohave rattlesnake is a protected species and therefore illegal to kill.
    Where did you get that from?

    2. Mohave Rattlesnake.

    a. It is the second most common type. For every ten to fifteen Diamondbacks one Mohave is found.
    b. It is a very secretive and non-aggressive snake.
    c. Is the most venomous, with a neurotoxic venom "twenty times more venomous than the actual Western Diamondbacks."
    d. It is very green in color for a rattlesnake, an adaptation for sitting in trees or on cacti while hunting birds.

    Protected Rattlesnakes of Arizona

    There are 11 species and 7 sub species of rattlesnakes in Arizona. 5 of the 18 are protected by law.

    Rock Rattlesnake, Twinspot Rattlesnake, New Mexican Ridgenosed Rattlesnake, Ridgenosed Rattlesnake, and Desert Massasauga Rattlesnake are all protected.

    Is what I found.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by generic602
    A few months ago I had a real close call while hiking South Mountain. I came up on it so fast that I didn't see it, and it struck out at me. It only missed me by a few inches, but at least it missed me. The suck thing was that he was right in the middle of a narrow section of trail with no way to bypass the area. I tried throwing/rolling rocks at it, and the effer just wouldn't move. After about 10 minutes I remembered a technique that Marty Stoufer showed on Wild America. I held my Camelbak above my head, and started to sway left & right - kind of like birds do when they are being 'menacing'. The effect was immediate - the snake literally took off for the nearest bush as fast as it could. Of course my wife was laughing at me the entire time because I looked like a moron
    That was a very smart solution! That is exactly how roadrunners consume rattlesnakes. They bob back and forth, back and forth. The snake (if it does not retreat) becomes mezmerized by the movement. After several minutes of this movement, the roadrunner reaches around and grabs the rattler by the neck and gives it a firm shake a few times. The rattlesnake's neck, being very fragile, is easily broken. Then down the hatch it goes! It is very interesting to watch. Kudos for acting like big bird!
    It's only skin, it'll grow back!!

    Save the drama for your mama!!!

    Porkchop Sandwiches!

  59. #59
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    this is what i do when i run into a rattlesnake on the trail....

    go get it and pick it up

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