Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    127

    Anyone running the new XT wheelset?

    Thinking about purchasing Shimanos M775 XT wheelset for my ride, would be quite a weight savings over my Alex TD20s.

    Just curious if anyone is using them and how they like them? I ride mostly XC, t100, mcdowell, Flag, Sedona, etc. Nothing too crazy, the occasional (small) jump.

    The fact that they're tubeless ready is a plus too, and the price is right!

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    one more time
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    539
    I have the XT wheelset on my new rig - mine has the 15mm TA front wheel. Only ridden with them a few times but the feel great, plenty stiff and smooth running. Engagement in the rear feel fine, its not a chris king but it does the job well.

    Im running continental mountain king UST 2.4s - with a splash of Stans fluid. What a pleasure to fit the tires - inflated with a floor pump just like there was a tube in there!

    Here is the link to my post... http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=511353
    Bikes, beer and pizza.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hikerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,033
    Quote Originally Posted by sarcazmo
    Thinking about purchasing Shimanos M775 XT wheelset for my ride, would be quite a weight savings over my Alex TD20s.

    Just curious if anyone is using them and how they like them? I ride mostly XC, t100, mcdowell, Flag, Sedona, etc. Nothing too crazy, the occasional (small) jump.

    The fact that they're tubeless ready is a plus too, and the price is right!

    Thanks!
    I bought a pair at SMC.

    Took rear wheel in because it was badly out of true.

    Took rear wheel back to SMC because the hub was starting to freeze up. The mechanic there re-greased the hub and said everything was fine. (Like they didn't believe me -- the wheel was under warranty and they had a receipt, but were probably afraid that they would have to eat the cost. No problem, I'll never go back.)

    Broke a spoke just riding along on National. SMC closed for the day, so I went to Landis, who had spare spokes for this wheel. Big dollars for labor.

    A few months later, on a ride to the ruin (the western extension to the DC) the hub froze up solid. Just like having a fixed gear.

    Replaced the free hub myself ($50.00 ) and had Landis replace four spokes that got torn up when the freewheeling hub fed the chain into the space between the chain and the wheels. Cost of spokes -- around twenty five dollars. Cost of labor -- around twenty-five dollars. Got an opinion from their mechanic that wheels with J-Bend spokes are much easier to deal with and don't cost as much. His suggestion -- sell these suckers on e-Bay.

    Last weekend I noticed a few extremely loose spokes. Tuned the wheel myself with a pair of small crescent wrenches (non-standard spokes and the SMC didn't include the spoke wrenches that supposedly come with the wheel set, even after I came back to ask about these.)

    Am now waiting for specialty spoke wrenches from Jenson USA so that I can easily and quickly rebuild the re-tune the rear wheel myself without rubbing the anodizing off of the spoke nuts (like both the shops that worked on them did.)

    The wheels are great when they are working, but if you are big and strong get something else. (I'm not that big -- I weigh 190 pounds and spend most of my mountain bike time on relatively easy cross-country trails.)

    I'll carefully tune these wheels to even tension and then ride them wheels until they are dead. I don't think that will take too long.

    If you do buy the wheels, get yourself a new freehub and a 14mm allen wrench right away.

    Dave
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
    The Milagro Beanfield War

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    127
    I've read some similar reports to yours in the Shimano forum but they seemed few and far between.

    I've been doing some searching and for the price/performance ratio it seems like these would be hard to beat.

    Any other suggestions?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    137
    bring it in to a shop that knows. I had a customer with the same problem and I sent it in for warranty and he received a brand new wheel 4 days later. They did have a small batch that had some bearing race issues. I have had 4 sets all flawless. Strong and true

  6. #6
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    91
    I'm a Shimano fan and I think they would be a good bet unless you're really heavy in which you could buy something else.

  7. #7
    one more time
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    539
    One thing to note is that the QR and 15mm TA wheelsets have 23.3mm wide rims (M775 & M778), the 20mm TA version (M776) has the heavier and wider 26.4mm rims.
    Bikes, beer and pizza.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: StudioDino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    184
    I had mine for one year. Used them in the 2008 MBAA races until now and so far (knock on wood) no problems. I used the wheels for racing only and not training except for pre-ride one week before a race.
    www.StudioDino.com
    The Ride: 2013 Specialized Epic is epic / Roubaix

  9. #9
    I am Walt
    Reputation: waltaz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    5,415
    I've blown two XT's, and always dealt with loose spokes. I ride similar to you - what I'll call "aggressive desert XC." Also, I'm 185-190 lbs pre-gearing up.

    I would never use another XT hub.
    Ride more; post less...

  10. #10
    Fragile - must be Italian
    Reputation: dgangi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,308
    You'll find lots of people on this forum who have demolished an XT hub. I've personally witnessed 2 of them self destructing.

    Now I realize that Shimano XT hubs were redesigned for 2009...but in my mind I think it's still a little premature to call them "better" than the old design. We'll need another 6-12 months of time before there has been enough miles on them to see if they are built any stronger than their old hubs.

    I considered getting the 2009 Shimano XT wheelset for my Kona but decided to get a custom Hope/Stans wheelset instead. I'm a big fan of "easy to work on" and "built with standard, easy-to-find parts". Neither of these descriptions fit the Shimano (or Mavic) wheelsets.

    Thx...Doug

  11. #11
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    30,673
    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    I've blown two XT's
    The $35 freehub?

    I've blown my DT 340 once already, but with both of these products the rebuild is pretty easy. With shimano it's just unscrew and screw-in a new freehub. With DT it's more difficult (force wise), even though it doesn't require tools.

    So what wouldn't I blow up? Probaly nothing, I've blown up the shimano freehub about 3 times, but it's easy to replace and rediculous to think that I'm not going to kill it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  12. #12
    sprocket
    Reputation: yetisurly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    3,184
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    The $35 freehub?

    I've blown my DT 340 once already, but with both of these products the rebuild is pretty easy. With shimano it's just unscrew and screw-in a new freehub. With DT it's more difficult (force wise), even though it doesn't require tools.

    So what wouldn't I blow up? Probaly nothing, I've blown up the shimano freehub about 3 times, but it's easy to replace and rediculous to think that I'm not going to kill it.

    Agreed. stuff wears out. the freehub is super easy to replace and the Shimano hubs are very reliable when adjusted correctly.

  13. #13
    Fragile - must be Italian
    Reputation: dgangi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,308
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    The $35 freehub?
    The two XT hub failures I've seen in the past few months involved a catastrophic failure of the hub body itself (shell split apart). And one of those failures happened to Chongo Bob...a relatively lightweight dude.

    What hub are you using on your 29'er? Is that the DT-340 you broke? BTW - I hear the DT-340's are kinda wimpy. I had a DT-340 get loose on me on my last wheelset. Luckly I was able to get it to the bike shop before it failed.

    I've never had an XT hub so I can't personally comment on their durability. So far I've had GREAT luck with the Hope hubs as well as whatever hubs are on my Easton Havoc wheels (EASIEST hubs to service!).

    Thx...Doug

  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    30,673
    Quote Originally Posted by dgangi
    The two XT hub failures I've seen in the past few months involved a catastrophic failure of the hub body itself (shell split apart). And one of those failures happened to Chongo Bob...a relatively lightweight dude.

    What hub are you using on your 29'er? Is that the DT-340 you broke? BTW - I hear the DT-340's are kinda wimpy. I had a DT-340 get loose on me on my last wheelset. Luckly I was able to get it to the bike shop before it failed.

    I've never had an XT hub so I can't personally comment on their durability. So far I've had GREAT luck with the Hope hubs as well as whatever hubs are on my Easton Havoc wheels (EASIEST hubs to service!).

    Thx...Doug
    XT hubs on the 29er right now. I have thousands of miles on XTs, with no real problems. They are easy to maintain.

    I don't know what you mean by the 340 got "loose", it is true that it's essentially held together by the quick release, but the star-ratchet drive is very solid, simple, and hard to strip (but I can kill anything). The 340 is a great hub, beefier than the 240, but with the same type of mechanism. DT hubs use cartridge bearings, so if that's what you mean by "loose", if that happens you throw em out and get new ones pressed in. So it doesn't really do the same sort of "loose" thing as the shimano hubs do when the bearings aren't preloaded correctly. When the star-ratchet is worn it will just slip, and it's obvious.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hikerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,033
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    The $35 freehub?

    I've blown my DT 340 once already, but with both of these products the rebuild is pretty easy. With shimano it's just unscrew and screw-in a new freehub. With DT it's more difficult (force wise), even though it doesn't require tools.

    So what wouldn't I blow up? Probaly nothing, I've blown up the shimano freehub about 3 times, but it's easy to replace and rediculous to think that I'm not going to kill it.
    Um, no, actually the FIFTY dollar freehub. The design changed in 2008. The WH775 wheels don't use the good old reliable 525 hubs. The mechanism changed to accommodate the oversize axle and provide quicker engagement.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...ehub+Body.aspx

    Yes, the freehub is quite easy to replace. I should probably order another one, but I wonder if I'd be better off just saving my money for a new wheel. But maybe it just goes with the territory -- I killed a DT Swiss Onyx freehub body the year before last.

    Maybe Arizona just kills bike parts.
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
    The Milagro Beanfield War

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    137
    if you're gonna work on the new 775 yourself, you'd better run to grainger to get a 14mm allen wrench. They also changed the allen size

  17. #17
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    91
    I trust that the design will be better but as you say there aren't enough miles made with them to make a concrete judgement.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hikerdave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,033
    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave
    I bought a pair at SMC.

    Took rear wheel in because it was badly out of true.

    Took rear wheel back to SMC because the hub was starting to freeze up. The mechanic there re-greased the hub and said everything was fine. (Like they didn't believe me -- the wheel was under warranty and they had a receipt, but were probably afraid that they would have to eat the cost. No problem, I'll never go back.)

    Broke a spoke just riding along on National. SMC closed for the day, so I went to Landis, who had spare spokes for this wheel. Big dollars for labor.

    A few months later, on a ride to the ruin (the western extension to the DC) the hub froze up solid. Just like having a fixed gear.

    Replaced the free hub myself ($50.00 ) and had Landis replace four spokes that got torn up when the freewheeling hub fed the chain into the space between the chain and the wheels. Cost of spokes -- around twenty five dollars. Cost of labor -- around twenty-five dollars. Got an opinion from their mechanic that wheels with J-Bend spokes are much easier to deal with and don't cost as much. His suggestion -- sell these suckers on e-Bay.

    Last weekend I noticed a few extremely loose spokes. Tuned the wheel myself with a pair of small crescent wrenches (non-standard spokes and the SMC didn't include the spoke wrenches that supposedly come with the wheel set, even after I came back to ask about these.)

    Am now waiting for specialty spoke wrenches from Jenson USA so that I can easily and quickly rebuild the re-tune the rear wheel myself without rubbing the anodizing off of the spoke nuts (like both the shops that worked on them did.)

    The wheels are great when they are working, but if you are big and strong get something else. (I'm not that big -- I weigh 190 pounds and spend most of my mountain bike time on relatively easy cross-country trails.)

    I'll carefully tune these wheels to even tension and then ride them wheels until they are dead. I don't think that will take too long.

    If you do buy the wheels, get yourself a new freehub and a 14mm allen wrench right away.

    Dave
    Here's an update on the wheel set. I got my nipple wrenches from Shimano and went right to work (on the bike )

    I found lots of wheel hop and uneven tension in the rear wheel which I tuned out after about an hour. Then I went to work on resulting wobble, which I was able to eliminate after another hour. The wheels are very touchy, with extremely small changes ( less than an eighth of a turn ) making huge changes. At the same time, the spokes must be carefully held at the flats to prevent windup. I suspect that the mechanic who fixed my wheel didn't pay the required attention to detail and left a bit of windup in the spokes which subsequently caused the wheel to de-tension.

    The rear wheel held up well until this morning, when once again I broke a spoke Just Riding Along. (Through a flat sandy stretch of a wash leading to the Desert Classic.) Coincidentally, last night I had checked the wheels and found that they were still true.

    I suspect that I caused a latent problem in the wheel riding down National on my mid-week ride last week.

    So even with careful attention to detail, these wheels are still a problem.

    I'll probably bring them in to Curbside Cyclery for one last repair.

    No problems whatsoever with the replacement freehub, though. Looks like Shimano worked that one out.
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
    The Milagro Beanfield War

  19. #19
    It's a Sledgehammer.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    357
    I've never understood the group of people that will tolerate cup/cone hubs. Dirt just goes right in there, and you have to clean em out all the time. It'd be neat if they had a grease port. Cartridge hubs you just replace the bearing every 2 or 5 YEARS. silky smooooth. I'm running a Hadley this past year and it's good as new. But come to think of it, I take it apart (the freehub) and clean it about as often as a cup and cone.. hahah. My upcoming lightweight wheelset will be hope/355's...

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    231
    Other than hard to find/replace spokes, 24 spoke wheels are not the best idea for everyday riding in AZ. Sure they will feel super snappy and quick, and for race day they probably are great, but for a durable wheel that can handle the rocks of Phoenix I would just stick to a more traditional wheel. You can get quality hubs, rims, and DB spokes in a custom built wheel that will be just a little heavier, about the same or a little more $$, and a bazzilion times more durable than those XTs. This is especially so if you weigh more than 180#.

    I personally haven't used these wheels, so take this with a grain of salt. I have however ran low spoke XC wheels before, and destroyed them (broken hub flange, and taco'd rim) within a few months of riding mountain single-track around Salt Lake City that was nothing like the rocky terrain we have here.

    .G.
    Last edited by mountainflow; 06-25-2009 at 11:29 PM.
    "Doing the right thing" is like water. It's good for all living things,and flows without thinking about where it's going.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: berzerker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    350
    Quote Originally Posted by hikerdave
    Maybe Arizona just kills bike parts.

    Arizona doesn't kill bike parts, mountain bikers kill bike parts.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.