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  1. #1
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    27.5 or 29 in Arizona chunk?

    Hello. I've always rode 29 because of the rollover ability and ability to gain speed quickly going down, but I'm also small and have never felt in control of the big wheels. I keep wanting to switch to 27.5 but every time I'm in the chunk I feel thankful I'm on 29 wheels.

    For those with experience with both sizes in arizona, what's your opinion?

    This is for a one bike quiver, so I guess there's more to it than just chunk, but you get the point.

  2. #2
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    I went from 29 to 27.5 earlier this year and love it. I definitely feel more in control going down and have not lost anything on the climbs. I feel like I can accelerate quicker, which helps me get through chunk. I've had no problem hanging with my 29er buddies.

    Test a couple and see what you think...

  3. #3
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    There's no real answer. Every rider is going to give their opinion based on their preferences. I've had a bunch of nice 27.5 rigs and I didn't really care for any of them. I'm a 29er guy, but I'm tall, too.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  4. #4
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    I have one of each and although I don't live in AZ, I've ridden it enough to know what it is like.

    As others have said, only you will know what's best for you.

    Having most of my recent years being spent on a 29er, there was a short learning curve to get to know how my newish 27.5er would react compared to the 29er.

    The 29er does gobble up stuff better but not by a landslide. To me, this is negligible between the two. For me, it does accelerate a little fast from all angles.

    The 27.5er does react ever so slightly faster in maneuvering, though. But the biggest surprise was it's ability to turn noticeable sharper/tighter. Where I tend to roll very wide and out on the edge of a switchback aboard my 29er, I find that I can almost cut corners (while within the trail boundaries) on the 27.5er. To me, this is the only big difference between the two.

    They are both great bikes but I tend to see more guys owning the 29er version when a model is offered in both wheel sizes.

    To each, his own.
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  5. #5
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    The thing I initially struggled with when increasing my wheel size was "re-formatting" my approach to technical climbing. Because of the larger wheel size, I felt I had to trust the inertia of the larger wheel size and reduce my RPMs on the climb up....I switched to a taller gear than I had previously with the smaller wheel size. All in all, it took me a week or two to change my approach. I really do like the rollover ability of the larger wheel size, but every switchback I come into, part of me wishes for that smaller wheel.....

    I suppose it's all about tradeoffs and what you value more. I'm 5'7" with a 30" inseam on a small 29r right now with it being my one bike quiver....for now....always looking for the next one!




  6. #6
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    I switched to 27.5 about 4 months ago from a 29. I'm 5'9" and felt a similar lack of control on the 29. The 27.5 has been more fun and I'm a better rider on it. The downside is I do find it gets hung up on the AZ chunk more easily. I have compensated by riding with more speed, but still not as fluid as I like yet.

    It is also a bit of a challenge to keep up with friends who have 29ers on long grinds. That being said, its a keeper.
    The only trace I leave behind is tire marks.

  7. #7
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    I would say to not over analyze wheel size and just search for the perfect fit. Both sizes clearly work well, that's why they both sell well. I have an Enduro 29 and it is absolutely perfect for me.
    “Think of bicycles as rideable art that can just about save the world.”
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  8. #8
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    You struggle with this question, those on 26" wheels do not.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  9. #9
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    If you have well tuned full suspension does the extra 1. 5 inch really matter?
    Sounds like you want one of those 27.5 all mountain bikes the industry pushing now, Bronson etc.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalaficionado View Post
    If you have well tuned full suspension does the extra 1. 5 inch really matter?
    Sounds like you want one of those 27.5 all mountain bikes the industry pushing now, Bronson etc.
    If you have larger wheels, you might not need the inefficiencies associated with more suspension.
    Death from Below.

  11. #11
    My other ride is your mom
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    If you have larger wheels, you might not need the inefficiencies associated with more suspension.
    True...or if you have a really efficient suspension, the extra 1.5 does matter.




  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    If you have larger wheels, you might not need the inefficiencies associated with more suspension.
    But he also doesn't like 29 inch wheels, so 27.5 FS makes more sense for him.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maadjurguer View Post
    True...or if you have a really efficient suspension, the extra 1.5 does matter.
    This^^^. The 6" travel bike of today don't give up much in the climbing dept.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrwhlr View Post
    You struggle with this question, those on 26" wheels do not.
    well played
    Make Flagstaff RAD Again.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for all the responses. Yes I love the 29r rollover ability but I never feel in control of 29ers. I've had 4 in the past 2 years and its just not working out. A combo of being 5'6 and not being an advanced rider is an issue. So that's why I now want to move to 27.5.

    I just wanted to make sure people weren't regretting 27.5 getting caught in the AZ rocks.

    So yes I'm shopping for a 27.5 bike.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by legitposter View Post
    Thanks for all the responses. Yes I love the 29r rollover ability but I never feel in control of 29ers. I've had 4 in the past 2 years and its just not working out. A combo of being 5'6 and not being an advanced rider is an issue. So that's why I now want to move to 27.5.

    I just wanted to make sure people weren't regretting 27.5 getting caught in the AZ rocks.

    So yes I'm shopping for a 27.5 bike.
    Never owned a 27.5, but I did regret getting a All mountain 26er couple of years ago. didn't make the downhill that much smoother and it only made the climbs that much tougher... this in comparison to 29HT
    Last edited by metalaficionado; 11-23-2015 at 01:56 PM.

  17. #17
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    I personally definitely regretted the money I've spent on 27.5 bikes. But that's just me. At the OP's height, 27.5 makes a lot more sense for him/her.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  18. #18
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    Some guys have to put more effort into bike setup to be able to get the performance available. But you can still have fun with less.
    How about in between=27.5+ Like a Scott Genius 700 Plus, Stumpy 6Fattie or one of the hardtails.

  19. #19
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    I have a 27.5 nomad and a 29 SS HT. The 29 rolls over a bunch, but for chunk and any sort of speed descending I need some rear squish. The nomad simply just eats up the terrain. I used to have a 26 nomad and this new version is light years better. If I had to do it again, I would make the same choice 6" full squish 27.5

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalaficionado View Post
    Never owned a 27.5, but I did regret getting a All mountain 26er couple of years ago. didn't make the downhill that much smoother and it only made the climbs that much tougher... this in comparison to 29HT
    Gonna go out a limb and say if 26" all mtn was not smoother than a ht, than you were probably not doing something right.

  21. #21
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    I ride a 5" FS 27.5. It's my only bike. No regrets at all.

  22. #22
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    Riding the Dells a few weeks ago on my 29er I faced what I thought was a pretty significant limitation on my bike. During my trip, something happened to my shocks, I'm not sure if it was the temperature (which can't be the case, because it's not much different than our summer temp) or some other factor, but had a hell of a time trying to tune my suspension in AZ. In the chunky Dells, my air-suspension just didn't grip the rocks like my old Turner RFX with a coil shock. I think this made the 29er feel even more clunky and obtuse. Usually it rips on downhills due to the short stays and switchbacks are no problem, but the chunky stuff of the Dells combined with the air suspension was a bit frustrating and took a lot of extra work. Coil suspension in chunk makes a pretty big difference and the more chunky it is, the bigger the difference is. I'd like to think modern air shocks can overcome this, but definitely not the tune I had and it just didn't seem like it could be sensitive enough to get there (Monarch +, which seemed to work pretty damn well before I came to AZ).

    If you love chunk, if you REALLY love chunk and want to enjoy it rather than fight, get something that can be equipped with a coil shock.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Riding the Dells a few weeks ago on my 29er I faced what I thought was a pretty significant limitation on my bike. During my trip, something happened to my shocks, I'm not sure if it was the temperature (which can't be the case, because it's not much different than our summer temp) or some other factor, but had a hell of a time trying to tune my suspension in AZ. In the chunky Dells, my air-suspension just didn't grip the rocks like my old Turner RFX with a coil shock. I think this made the 29er feel even more clunky and obtuse. Usually it rips on downhills due to the short stays and switchbacks are no problem, but the chunky stuff of the Dells combined with the air suspension was a bit frustrating and took a lot of extra work. Coil suspension in chunk makes a pretty big difference and the more chunky it is, the bigger the difference is. I'd like to think modern air shocks can overcome this, but definitely not the tune I had and it just didn't seem like it could be sensitive enough to get there (Monarch +, which seemed to work pretty damn well before I came to AZ).

    If you love chunk, if you REALLY love chunk and want to enjoy it rather than fight, get something that can be equipped with a coil shock.
    Altitude?
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  24. #24
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    I'm 5'2" and from my experience the shorter riders will find 27.5 better suited for their size. To me it's kind of like WSD geometry for women. The smaller tire bike will generally fit better than the 29er. That said, I ride 29ers on all XC stuff and 27.5 on AM rides. I can climb much better on a 27.5. If I had to choose only one it would be 27.5. I'm lucky enough to own both.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Riding the Dells a few weeks ago on my 29er I faced what I thought was a pretty significant limitation on my bike. During my trip, something happened to my shocks, I'm not sure if it was the temperature (which can't be the case, because it's not much different than our summer temp) or some other factor, but had a hell of a time trying to tune my suspension in AZ. In the chunky Dells, my air-suspension just didn't grip the rocks like my old Turner RFX with a coil shock. I think this made the 29er feel even more clunky and obtuse. Usually it rips on downhills due to the short stays and switchbacks are no problem, but the chunky stuff of the Dells combined with the air suspension was a bit frustrating and took a lot of extra work. Coil suspension in chunk makes a pretty big difference and the more chunky it is, the bigger the difference is. I'd like to think modern air shocks can overcome this, but definitely not the tune I had and it just didn't seem like it could be sensitive enough to get there (Monarch +, which seemed to work pretty damn well before I came to AZ).

    If you love chunk, if you REALLY love chunk and want to enjoy it rather than fight, get something that can be equipped with a coil shock.
    Some of us admit to the aging process rather than blaming it on the bike or shock

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Riding the Dells a few weeks ago on my 29er I faced what I thought was a pretty significant limitation on my bike. During my trip, something happened to my shocks, I'm not sure if it was the temperature (which can't be the case, because it's not much different than our summer temp) or some other factor, but had a hell of a time trying to tune my suspension in AZ. In the chunky Dells, my air-suspension just didn't grip the rocks like my old Turner RFX with a coil shock. I think this made the 29er feel even more clunky and obtuse. Usually it rips on downhills due to the short stays and switchbacks are no problem, but the chunky stuff of the Dells combined with the air suspension was a bit frustrating and took a lot of extra work. Coil suspension in chunk makes a pretty big difference and the more chunky it is, the bigger the difference is. I'd like to think modern air shocks can overcome this, but definitely not the tune I had and it just didn't seem like it could be sensitive enough to get there (Monarch +, which seemed to work pretty damn well before I came to AZ).

    If you love chunk, if you REALLY love chunk and want to enjoy it rather than fight, get something that can be equipped with a coil shock.
    I went from a CTD to a DBInline this summer, and was shocked at the difference (pun intended). DBInline was much more coilesque, presumably due to a difference in the negative spring design. Then I blew up the DBInline, so there is that.

    Anyway, I think there are air options out there that are much better than they used to be. It's tough to find a non-DH bike with a leverage ratio that doesn't depend on the progression of an air can, but the latest crop of bikes with high volume OE air cans might be a candidate.

  27. #27
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    Jayem: Problem solved.

    IMG_0857 by dbozman1173, on Flickr
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  28. #28
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    People come around eventually......well, not the dirt roadies.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Jayem: Problem solved.
    X2. Can't wait to stick this on the RFX. Brown santa arrives today.
    27.5 or 29 in Arizona chunk?-elevensix.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by Sharp-End View Post
    I went from a CTD to a DBInline this summer, and was shocked at the difference (pun intended). DBInline was much more coilesque, presumably due to a difference in the negative spring design. Then I blew up the DBInline, so there is that.

    Anyway, I think there are air options out there that are much better than they used to be. It's tough to find a non-DH bike with a leverage ratio that doesn't depend on the progression of an air can, but the latest crop of bikes with high volume OE air cans might be a candidate.

    For all the hype the DBInline get's I found it have a rather harsh overall feel with restrictive high speed circuits. And needing a rebuild after 4 months. On a 29r no less. Pushed Monarch Plus is still the best air shock I've run.

    And your right about frame design. Most leverage rates are designed with air shocks in mind. The fact that Push couldn't get the ElevenSix to work with the flat curve of the Mojo HD3 speaks to that.

  30. #30
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    Outerbike: Moab, Utah

    this is the best way to find out what is right for you. test them all on real trail and make a great vacation out of it. I was once looking at a full suspension 650B so I went here and tried about all you could. Good thing I did because it would be collecting dust in the garage had I bought one, I didn't like any 650B's. Saved me a lot of cash and had a great time riding all sorts of bikes on trails I never been to.
    "Not drinking is the Single Speed World Championships version of doping" -Jacquie Phelan

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  31. #31
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    The shock pictured is an Ohlins TTX with a ti spring I'm running on my E29. Best shock I've personally used. That PUSH shock is getting great feedback, though.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  32. #32
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    I tried a 27.5 the other day and I had problems with it on slow technical climbing. It seemed ok on descending but overall I prefer 26. Maybe I'm stubborn and old but I'm just not buying the hype.

    Plus I'm a broke student so why bother?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
    I tried a 27.5 the other day and I had problems with it on slow technical climbing. It seemed ok on descending but overall I prefer 26. Maybe I'm stubborn and old but I'm just not buying the hype.

    Plus I'm a broke student so why bother?
    Spent a week in Colorado on 27.5, seems faster thru rocks, wanted to stay in the outside of turns. Not really into the weight increase, Def harder to accelerate and keep speed on rollers. No big deal I guess, just hate having new standards pushed on me.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by raisingarizona View Post
    I tried a 27.5 the other day and I had problems with it on slow technical climbing. It seemed ok on descending but overall I prefer 26. Maybe I'm stubborn and old but I'm just not buying the hype.

    Plus I'm a broke student so why bother?
    Agreed. I never had problems rolling through trails on my 26 inch bikes. I just can't accept that somehow 27.5 is that much better. I traded in my old 26 inch bike for a long travel 29er. It does pedal more efficiently, but I don't think it is the 29 inch wheels that make a difference. Suspension designs have just gotten better and better.
    Getting a dropper post is like getting a bidet. I didn't know I needed one until I get one and boy, does my ass thank me.

  35. #35
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    I've had the same dilemma recently. Been riding a hardtail 29er for the last year but wanted to upgrade. Decided to go with a 650b but at the risk of not moving through the chunk as smoothly. I went that way just because I felt my 29 wasn't quick enough in the turns and I never felt fully in control.

  36. #36
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    27.5 isn't any better than 26 really. What is better is the bike geometry that came along the same time wheel size change did. The bikes ride way better due to the geo, but people notice the wheel change more, so they associate that with the better performance.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by crushinit View Post
    I felt my 29 wasn't quick enough in the turns and I never felt fully in control.
    And you really think it's the wheels? Not the head angle, stem length, wheelbase, chainstays, BB height, handlebar width, reach, SA, etc.

  38. #38
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    Titanium 420 - Carver Bikes

    I bet you with CS set at 16.5 inches, 80 mm fork and 30 mm stem, this baby would turn on a dime

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by metalaficionado View Post
    And you really think it's the wheels? Not the head angle, stem length, wheelbase, chainstays, BB height, handlebar width, reach, SA, etc.
    Easy killer. I understand there's plenty of things I could change, I could change a lot and I'm realizing I'll never get the quickness in turns I'm looking for at the money I'd want to spend.

  40. #40
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    My Gawd, haven't you guys heard? 27.5 is better.
    life is... "All About Bikes"...

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hawg View Post
    My Gawd, haven't you guys heard? 27.5 is better.
    That's shoulder-mounted butthole talk.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  42. #42
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    For the most part, the RIDER is more important than the bike anyway. The best rider in our group is better than the rest of us in every phase of riding on his 27.5 Bronson. It was no different when he was on a Yeti 29er. I personally have went thru every phase of mountain bikes and currently have a hardtail 29er, a 27.5 with 155mm of rear end travel (with a 150mm Pike up front) and a 27.5 with 127mm of rear end travel and a 140mm Fox 34 up front.

    I live in SoCal but ride all over the Western US...we've been to Oregon, Durango, St George and Sedona in the last (6) months and I find myself riding the shorter travel 27.5 most often...including all week on our Sedona trip. The ONLY thing it gives up to the longer travel 27.5 bike is plowing thru the chunder at any speed. I personally don't miss the FS 29ers I've had (Tallboy and then the Tallboy LTc). My next bike will be a 27.5+ capable bike.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Jayem: Problem solved.
    Still soggy horst-link pedaling on steep stuff. I'm solving it a different way, and not all that bad for cost effectiveness compared to a $1100 shock and prolonging the cheap spec frame (pivots intended for about a season and not easy to replace).

    On the old 6pack/RFX, I ran everything from a RP3 to the Avalanche Chubby, including many air and coil shocks in between.

    Of course, the Chubby was awesome with firm low-speed damping that would still blow off great for chunky stuff and feel smoother the faster you went through chunk, but the constant was that the coil shocks had a lot more climbing traction in the chunk, much better for tech.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Still soggy horst-link pedaling on steep stuff. I'm solving it a different way, and not all that bad for cost effectiveness compared to a $1100 shock and prolonging the cheap spec frame (pivots intended for about a season and not easy to replace).

    On the old 6pack/RFX, I ran everything from a RP3 to the Avalanche Chubby, including many air and coil shocks in between.

    Of course, the Chubby was awesome with firm low-speed damping that would still blow off great for chunky stuff and feel smoother the faster you went through chunk, but the constant was that the coil shocks had a lot more climbing traction in the chunk, much better for tech.
    That's fascinating, pretty sure that dude is happy with his bike.
    Nice KOM, sorry about your penis.

  45. #45
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    I've got an extra 27.5 you can try out, it's a small Norco Range. Pm me if your interested in getting together

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