Yay!!! cracked rib....and armor review- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 48 of 48
  1. #1

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261

    Yay!!! cracked rib....and armor review

    had my worse crash on sunday, flip over head first of a drop, and basically pulled a body muscle....never had such a wonderful complete body soreness like this before, no area seemed to be spared lol. Anywayss after the codeine wore off i realised it hurt to breath this morning so went to the docs. Nothing outright broken (i get to maintain my never-broken anything status!), but i'm a bit weary of riding this weekend, or the next, if not just for the soreness. Anyways i got off lucky i guess.

    This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit

  2. #2
    I wanna talk to Samson!
    Reputation: konabiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,303
    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    had my worse crash on sunday, flip over head first of a drop, and basically pulled a body muscle....never had such a wonderful complete body soreness like this before, no area seemed to be spared lol. Anywayss after the codeine wore off i realised it hurt to breath this morning so went to the docs. Nothing outright broken (i get to maintain my never-broken anything status!), but i'm a bit weary of riding this weekend, or the next, if not just for the soreness. Anyways i got off lucky i guess.

    This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit
    sucks that you got hurt zedro. cracked ribs are no fun. earlier in the season i cracked 3 or 4 on the trail. armour is better than armour. i could have been saved a lot of pain if i would have had a flack jacket of some kind. probly would have helped my seperated shoulder too. get better.

    maybe you should start designing armour that works
    JackNugz

    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    no, but they are shinier....it's like the fututre, where everything is really really shiny.....but still really just the same ol'crap

  3. #3
    Pro Crastinator
    Reputation: .WestCoastHucker.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,738
    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    .................This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit
    that's why i just fall on my head........


  4. #4
    Cynical Bystander
    Reputation: COmtbiker12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,770
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    that's why i just fall on my head........
    Im not posting anything since Im such a whore.
    Tony
    is making a comeback.

    Turns out that five years of not mountain biking, really makes one strive to get back to it.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    337
    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    had my worse crash on sunday, flip over head first of a drop, and basically pulled a body muscle....never had such a wonderful complete body soreness like this before, no area seemed to be spared lol. Anywayss after the codeine wore off i realised it hurt to breath this morning so went to the docs. Nothing outright broken (i get to maintain my never-broken anything status!), but i'm a bit weary of riding this weekend, or the next, if not just for the soreness. Anyways i got off lucky i guess.

    This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit
    I would like to point this to you zedro, that the purpose of body armour is the stop further injury, I would like to see you with out your rock garden armour and see how you do. Then you would be ranting about I wish I had body armour. Yes I have body armour but it helps in some cases. If you want to wrap your self in buble WRAP all over your body and go downhilling then that's probably your best method of protection at least you get to bounce down the hill.

  6. #6
    eci
    Reputation: snowskilz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,707
    Quote Originally Posted by COmtbiker12
    Im not posting anything since Im such a whore.
    your such a post whore you posted on here to proclaim that your a post whore

  7. #7
    DOH!
    Reputation: SprungShoulders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    473
    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit
    Sorry to hear about the injury, Zedro. Have you seen the old Balfa / Casel Equi armor? A more total-coverage design...



  8. #8
    Pro Crastinator
    Reputation: .WestCoastHucker.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    10,738
    Quote Originally Posted by SprungShoulders
    Sorry to hear about the injury, Zedro. Have you seen the old Balfa / Casel Equi armor? A more total-coverage design..
    i lost a pint of sweat, just looking at that armour......


  9. #9

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    Quote Originally Posted by Max_winner1
    ...I would like to see you with out your rock garden armour and see how you do. Then you would be ranting about I wish I had body armour. .....
    brilliant argument, cus for sure i was saying i would be better off without it

    in case you didnt get my point, good armor is better than so-so armor (oh, and you might of noticed the word 'review' in the subject line.). Half the reason i use armor is not to prevent major trauma, but to be able to get up quickly and keep riding through the day without the 5 mins of wiggling on the ground in pain.

    My old armor is basically the same (if not identical) as the Balfa armor shown above, but its by V-Top and they are also discontinued. The padding is thin and soft-shelled on the inside but i was amazed at the chest protection it provided since it did disperse the force over a larger area (ie: lower pressure). I landed chest first on a big boulder once from a few feet up (thrown of a berm); it felt like i got sacked hard but to no consequence. In this crash, i actually fell on my head and back first, yet somehow still sustained a front side injury. I'm considering moving back to the V-Tops with the unfortunate heat penalty, but the elbow guards need some fixing.

    I was just commenting on the pad design, and how i think it isnt properly optimized, not that i would of been better off naked with a caved in chest cavity....

  10. #10
    DOH!
    Reputation: SprungShoulders's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    473
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    i lost a pint of sweat, just looking at that armour......
    LOL. Yes, it does look a wee bit warm. I like the concept, though. I wear Freefall Gear. I've never really had many complaints about it's protection, especially the shoulder coverage. But I recently had a good run-in with a tree, basically t-boned it sideways, between the chest and spinal plates. Nothing broke (on me), but man, I had a super nice purple bruise, and the impact did unpleasant things to my lat and serratus muscles, besides knocking the wind out of me completely. I really wished for better rib protection at that moment...

  11. #11
    Sin
    Sin is offline

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    271
    661 pressure suit bomb **** tested it out at keystone on the rock garden felt like I fell on a matress no **** for reals....

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: laotsu42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    374
    ouch ...rib injuries are the worst to heal ...i just had one from a street sign that was on the outside of the beam of a street light in the middle of the sidewalk...couldn't see it at all and i was going around 20 mph

    messed up both thumbs and went to the ER for that and i didn't realize i messed up my ribs untill i lay down on the couch and relaxed the next day...oooooooOOOOO **** it hurt ....
    couldn't breath couldn't laugh and then my roomate tried to tape it and that made it worse mostly because taping your rib cage has a bad affect on pectorals they stick out
    makes it look like clevage that was when my roommate started falling over pointing and laughing and when i looked down i discovered that laughing is the worst thing to do with a rib injury, untaped my rib cage and went back to the ER ...yuck ...twice in a row sucks ...and it took months until my ribs weren't soar and i still get a muscle cramp every now and then ...

    tough wreck, good to hear your allright ...

    hope it heals quick

    my roommate keeps telling me that he could make a carbon fiber suite with interlocking body panels . it sounds cool and he's one hell of an engineer. i have been wondering about the actual saftey of armour due to the lack of side protection and size of the plates on my 661 still haven't gotten to use it though ...*sigh* ...

    rest ...and try not to laugh too hard ...
    ______
    "thirty spokes converge upon a wheel but it is the hole in the center that enables it to be used"

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Scott@GO-RIDE.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,334
    That's true for just about any body protection. If you reach the limits of the design you will have bruising or injury. If you have ever been in a serious car accident you will find a large bruise from the seat belt. It's completely soft, but will still cause damage as you reach its design limits.
    Can't keep track anymore - Giant, Santa Cruz, Pivot, Yeti, Norco, Salsa, Intense - if it rolls on dirt I like it :thumbsup:

  14. #14

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    Quote Originally Posted by laotsu42
    rest ...and try not to laugh too hard ...
    yeah, my mom was being silly today and i couldnt stop laughing; begged her to stop being so kooky cus she's hurting her son....lol (ouch)...

  15. #15

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    895
    might as well wear full combat gear

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    164

    interesting

    Hey Zed, do you think you would have been more or less injured if you were wearing something like a 661 defender chest guard - you know, one of those hard plasic shells raised away from your body?

  17. #17

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    Quote Originally Posted by OGRipper
    Hey Zed, do you think you would have been more or less injured if you were wearing something like a 661 defender chest guard - you know, one of those hard plasic shells raised away from your body?
    i dunno, depends how it contacts the body i guess, but i dont think it would be ideal. Foam is really great at energy absorbtion, plastic is good at transmitting energy. So an outer plastic shell can transfer a small point impact area over a larger area to an underlying foam layer which can absorb a good deal of the energy. Over a large area, the body can take quite a deal of force as well.

    As for the combat armor, whats funny is the V-Top stuff is originally riot and combat gear that they marketed (and maybe slighlty altered) for mtb use for awhile.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    164
    Hmmm, guess we should all suit up like a hockey goalie, like the dude I saw I Northstar last weekend...

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,010
    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    had my worse crash on sunday, flip over head first of a drop, and basically pulled a body muscle....never had such a wonderful complete body soreness like this before, no area seemed to be spared lol. Anywayss after the codeine wore off i realised it hurt to breath this morning so went to the docs. Nothing outright broken (i get to maintain my never-broken anything status!), but i'm a bit weary of riding this weekend, or the next, if not just for the soreness. Anyways i got off lucky i guess.

    This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit
    if they told you that you "cracked a rib" - you LOOSE your never broken a bone status my friend...a cracked rib is broken - just not clean through...

    and those intercostal muscles hurt for a LONG time when you strain them...(I've broken two ribs in the front & two in the Vicodin (hydrocodone & Tylenol) is very helpful for the first few days - and mixes really well with Stone beers (but don't drive please)...

  20. #20

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    Quote Originally Posted by macrider
    if they told you that you "cracked a rib" - you LOOSE your never broken a bone status my friend...a cracked rib is broken - just not clean through...

    and those intercostal muscles hurt for a LONG time when you strain them...(I've broken two ribs in the front & two in the Vicodin (hydrocodone & Tylenol) is very helpful for the first few days - and mixes really well with Stone beers (but don't drive please)...
    ok ok, so i've never 'snapped' a bone then.....uhhg i cringe just thinking about it....

    i guess this wont clear up as fast as i thought it would .....now wheres my pills....

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,010
    well, at least there's that!

    at least 6 weeks would be my best guess - it takes longer as we get older..

    http://www.healthsquare.com/rx/vicodin.htm

  22. #22

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    174
    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    ok ok, so i've never 'snapped' a bone then.....uhhg i cringe just thinking about it....

    i guess this wont clear up as fast as i thought it would .....now wheres my pills....
    uhh... yer Canadian right? Drink a ****-load of maple syrup and call a moose in the morning!
    you will be fine tuff-guy- just put on a thick flannel next time,eh?
    heal quick brother!

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    337
    ZEDRO I want to some pics of you in action with your custome bike!

  24. #24
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059

    The heck with the body armor.

    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    had my worse crash on sunday, flip over head first of a drop, and basically pulled a body muscle....never had such a wonderful complete body soreness like this before, no area seemed to be spared lol. Anywayss after the codeine wore off i realised it hurt to breath this morning so went to the docs. Nothing outright broken (i get to maintain my never-broken anything status!), but i'm a bit weary of riding this weekend, or the next, if not just for the soreness. Anyways i got off lucky i guess.

    This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit
    I noticed in your post that you had a nice codeine treatment "before" you went to the doc. Now I've heard about that sweet Canadian pharmaceutical system up there. Can't you fix up an old American buddy with some of the illicit and cheap "good stuff"? Wink, wink, nod, nod? LOL! Well, I hope your ribs and muscles limber up. You young guys are made of rubber anyway...aren't you?

  25. #25
    Some Assembly Required
    Reputation: man w/ one hand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4,063

    All pads & armor does is minimize injury...

    it will not prevent/stop injury. I have yet to wreck & land on my shin and/or knee w/o @ least scratching it while wearin' pads. The initail impact IS dissapated and/or negated by the pads/armor causin' said armor/pads to rotate around your legs/arms/trunk, however, the subsequent thrashin', slidin' across th' ground/rocks/roots exposes said lges/arms/trunk to secondary impacts/scrapes/scratches. You'd have to pad up like the guys that wear those huge suits to let people beat on them while they practice self-defense, to keep from "getting hurt."

    I'm nursin' a seperated collarbone right now. Now there is an injury that needs some kind of pads/armor engineered to prevent from happenin'. As I understand it, collarbone is the most often broken bone there is among sports enthusiasts. Even if you can prevent impact from seperating a collarbone, hyper-flexation of the shoulder will still allow the shoulder to travel to the point of seperation from the collarbone.

    If we engineer a perfect suit of armor/pads, then what is point of it all??? To me, the fact that I have to be "on my game" because "I could die if I'm not," is part of what draws me to dh & freeride. Bikes/new bikes/new parts/new trails/etc....these are tools that allow us to ride. The ride...thats what it is about. Its easy to get caught up in all of the new shwag @ Interbike & on MTBR, but lets not forget what we go after....the ride, the drop, the huck, the jump, the trail. Bikes are our tools that enable us to do what we are addicted to.

    Get better Zedro, it happens to the best...sooner or later.

  26. #26

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC
    You young guys are made of rubber anyway...aren't you?
    apparently the effect wears down after 25....

  27. #27
    Lone Wolf
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    164

    ouch

    I hurt myself pretty good a month ago on a big jump. I thought I "cracked a rib " but I'm not sure if I did. The pain in my ribs was extreme for a couple days, and pretty bad for maybe two more weeks. Coughing or sneezing could bring tears to the eyes. Anyway, after that is when I decided to get some sort of chest protector. I looked at the MX style roost deflector, the plastic guard. Not overly impressed. It made alot of contact with my funky collarbone so I forgot that thing. I ended up getting a 661 assault suit. It really doesn't offer any protection in the spot that I hurt before but I guess its better than nothing.
    I think I'm all healed up so hopefully I won';t get hurt again. I'd like to hear if anyone finds a nice suit that offers good chest/rib protection.

  28. #28

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by .WestCoastHucker.
    i lost a pint of sweat, just looking at that armour......

    Heeee... I sweat like crazy in the thing when I standing still, but once you get rolling it actually breathes very well. Just stay away from those damn arms unless you have limbs as long as an ape

    No better impact protection, IMHO, but you pay for it.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    295
    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    This however further reinforces my belief the overly hard and thick yet small surface area of the RockGardn and its other generic siblings upper body armor breast plates arent the best type of protection. The thick plating will eliminate the point impact, but the stiff and small area of the pad puts too much pressure on the ribs. I can feel exactly where the pads were since both sides of my rib cage hurt in the exact same spot, although the left side is where its worse with the crack. Overall i'd say i'm not fond of the overall design, from pad design/location/absence to strap locations (or lack thereof). Unfortunatly, too many companies seem to be using the same overall generic setup despite noted differences in fit
    I was wearing a RockGardn Flak Jacket and slammed into a log bridge railing and bruised the side of my ribs, this has been about the 5th time I have bruised the side of my ribs while wearing a chest protector. I e-mailed RockGardn and suggested that they add a floating hard shell pad with good foam padding on the side of your ribs.
    Erik,
    Balle Racing
    www.balleracing.com

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    557
    Zedro,
    Just rest up and let it heal.. Be ready for some serious discomfort.. According to my friends who have been in your situation, ribs are the most painful thing to break/crack.

    As for the armor, even the best armor out won't prevent this type of thing if you hit hard enough. I was wearing a suit when I lacerated my kidney a few years back. The doctor said it still looked like I was hit with a baseball bat.

    Brian

  31. #31
    i should be working
    Reputation: rpl3000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    532

    get well

    anyway heres my two cents on the deal. i think you said you fell mostly on your back and should/neck right? if this isnt correct then null the following.

    you cracked a rib from the force of your lower body compressing into your upper body when you hit upside down or nearly upside down. i dont think your injury has anything to do with your body armor or lack of. its just the mechanics of your body folding with alot of force. i'm not in any way discounting the importance of wearing pads. the pads might have saved a shoulder, your ribs were probably didnt stand much chance. i'm 23 now and i cant take the falls like i could when i was 16. i think flexibility has alot to do with how bad you get hurt during some spills.

    get well soon.

  32. #32
    Some Assembly Required
    Reputation: man w/ one hand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4,063

    Right you are 3000

    Quote Originally Posted by rpl3000
    anyway heres my two cents on the deal. i think you said you fell mostly on your back and should/neck right? if this isnt correct then null the following.

    you cracked a rib from the force of your lower body compressing into your upper body when you hit upside down or nearly upside down. i dont think your injury has anything to do with your body armor or lack of. its just the mechanics of your body folding with alot of force. i'm not in any way discounting the importance of wearing pads. the pads might have saved a shoulder, your ribs were probably didnt stand much chance. i'm 23 now and i cant take the falls like i could when i was 16. i think flexibility has alot to do with how bad you get hurt during some spills.

    get well soon.
    The bodys limitations of how much it will fold, bend, flex, spread are a wonderfull thing to behold. We in the bikng community have found numerous ways, & continue to invent new ones each day, to exceed those limitations, much to the detrement of our bodies. Sounds funny to hear such older jargon coming from a "spring chicken". Flexibility does help to minimize injury.

  33. #33

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    140
    I think you have to take into account that these armour manufacturers and designers consider comfort and freedom of movement as a major part of their design. What good is armor if you cant ride with it on. It just may cause an accident because it is awkward to wear and doesn't allow free and natural movement. Yes, it would be great to have a full body kevlar suit that also allows you to dive 5000 ft. under the sea but can you imagine trying to negotiate a technical section with it on? I've never had a serious crash with my Flak Jacket but I think it (and others like it) offers the best protection while still allowing natural movement and breatheability. Just my $.02

  34. #34

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    14
    I cracked some ribs two weeks ago and I'm just glad it wasn't worse - one of the ribs was broken at an angle leaving two jagged edges to stab into my spleen. Armor won't protect you from everything. I wear a Dianese Safety Next jacket and the main reason I bought it was that it was light and cool - I knew I'd be more inclined to wear it all the time instead of leaving it in the truck when it was hot out. I'm sure somebody could design armor that will fend off a pick-mattock attack from every angle, but i doubt it would be comfortable enough to wear all the time. Same thing for helmets - just because you wear a DOT approved motorcycle helmet doesn't mean you're completely safe from head injuries.

    I've broken ribs before and it takes a LONG time to heal up to the point where you can ride without narcotics. I'd much rather break a collarbone or even an arm. I raced last weekend with the help of a rib belt and six Vicoden (felt like I was floating down the course), but now I don't plan on riding for real for a good 6-8 weeks. Don't want to end up like Rush Limbaugh, you know.

  35. #35

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    17

    Collar bone info

    Just some 411 for whoever cares. I'm sure that thwacking a collarbone on something hard would break the sucka, but think about the mechanics of that for a second... The fact is that most c-bone breaks in cycling are caused by trying to break your fall with an outstretched arm. The impact up your locked arm breaks your collarbone. C-bone separations are usually caused by brute force pulling your shoulder away from your neck, as in when landing on your shoulder and the side of your head at the same time. True. Ask any martial arts dude. Or a doctor. Some things no amount of armor will prevent.

    I've taken a bunch of falls (is that a comment on my skill?) in my rockgardn. I just got over the rows of "dot" bruises on my shoulder from the perforated foam. I'm a believer.

  36. #36
    Some Assembly Required
    Reputation: man w/ one hand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4,063
    Quote Originally Posted by Ridr
    Just some 411 for whoever cares. I'm sure that thwacking a collarbone on something hard would break the sucka, but think about the mechanics of that for a second... The fact is that most c-bone breaks in cycling are caused by trying to break your fall with an outstretched arm. The impact up your locked arm breaks your collarbone. C-bone separations are usually caused by brute force pulling your shoulder away from your neck, as in when landing on your shoulder and the side of your head at the same time. True. Ask any martial arts dude. Or a doctor. Some things no amount of armor will prevent.

    I've taken a bunch of falls (is that a comment on my skill?) in my rockgardn. I just got over the rows of "dot" bruises on my shoulder from the perforated foam. I'm a believer.
    Your exactly right. I'm a Shodan in the Shito-ryu disapline. One of the things I came to realize early on in my training was we are trying to make our opponents body do what it wasn't designed to do. Bend arms, limbs, bones contrary to the way they are mechanically inclined to move. Find the limitations of the body & exceed those limitations, of the other persons body of course. Biking tends to put us into positions very quickly that don't allow us the luxury of rolling or tumbling in a manner that will avoid injury, no matter the level of training. Goes w/the territory, be ready, it WILL happen.

  37. #37

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,257
    Zedro, sorry to hear about it.

    I use the RockGardn Flak Jacket. It has some limitations, but it's darned comfortable and has saved me from MANY more injuries than it has caused me discomfort.

    Weaknesses:

    - it's warm if you wear a jersey over top. if you have to wear it on your climb to the goods, don't put on your jersey until you head down, and don't zip it closed in front.

    - sizing is peculiar. I got a medium, I'm a 40 reg suit coat wearer, 16" x 34" dress shirt wearer. the armor is short in the torso front, leaving belly exposed... but long enough in the back with the armor plating over the spine and lower back. also, the velcro straps are insufficiently well-designed to give real adjustment. despite the tiny length of the armor, and my very average torso size, I couldn't get enough real adjustment out of the several velcro straps. the jacket is snug in some areas, sloppy in others. the excess on the hook-laden side of the straps will grab anything it nears, so RockGarden needs to do more homework on the adjustability. might be improved for 2004, don't know.

    Strengths:

    - I think the combination of comfort and protection is outstanding, and it's nowhere near as expensive as a Dainese Safety Jacket. But I haven't used any Dainese armour so I can't really compare fairly other than on price.

    - Washes easily in a tumble washer (front loader)

    ++++++++++++++++

    The 661 Pressure Suit looks almost identical. Don't know if the same company makes both and just lets 661 and RockGarden re-badge.

    Heal quickly!

  38. #38

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    man, i was expecting you to slam me hard there Gonzo

    it does wash nicely, now if only the guys i ride with would wash their stinky Dainese stuff....

    The RockGrden and the older 661 stuff are made from the same 'parts' (no doubt the same Taiwan catalogue), but seem to be 'body-fit' together differently (the 661 fit kinda oddly at the shoulders for some reason). The new 661 stuff looks very different though, with maybe only the spine plate in common with the previous stuff.

    the worst part about all this is i got the total shaft for work i just found out, so this has cost me 1500$ already.....that and i ripped my Transformers Deceptacon riding shirt

  39. #39

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    140
    I can definitely vouch for the Rockgardn Flak Jacket. Yesterday I was at Northstar and for some reason, I thought I was an "Expert". Karpiel ("expert" Course) quickly informed me that I was NOT!. Anyway, I endo'd and landed on a jagged boulder on my chest with full force and bounced down to the next boulder square on the top of my head. Well, I ripped a hole in my jersey just over the right chest area but never felt it. Incidently, my DOT helmet undoubtedly saved my melon by looking at the gouge on the top. Even though it was right below the lift, no one saw the awsome display of inadequate skill so I have no witnesses. I was the first person on the mountain yesterday. I'm sticking to advanced courses from now on. You guys can have the expert runs!!

  40. #40

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    69

    What know broken bones!

    You need to ride with me. I guarente all bones will snap. What you need are rib protectors. They are used for La Cross. They will fit right over your suit. They have a kidney belt and will protect both sides of ribs. Now if you want to step up the plate get a motorcycle chest protector and wear it over your suit. It may seem big and bulky and sweety but when you biff it in the rock garden y9ou will be laughing.............

    18 brokens bones hear. Going for the big 20.

    Bill Dog

  41. #41

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    69

    Bubble Rap!

    Hey thats a good idea. Better yet, how about that Grissly bear suit that they show on the discouvery channel. It wieghs like 175lbs. You could go off a cliff and let the black bears chew on you for a while and still get up.

    Bill Dog

  42. #42
    where's the kick stand?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    674
    do any of these top suits have collerbone pads?Irecently broke mine so naturally i want to protect it.I was looking at dainese safety jacket because of the spine protection.But the 661 are nice and alot cheaper.
    live to ride, ride to live

    R.I.P. Dimebag Darrell

  43. #43

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    Quote Originally Posted by Dog breath wastland racer
    Hey thats a good idea. Better yet, how about that Grissly bear suit that they show on the discouvery channel. It wieghs like 175lbs. You could go off a cliff and let the black bears chew on you for a while and still get up.

    Bill Dog
    how about an emergency inflato-suit, like car airbags?

  44. #44
    Some Assembly Required
    Reputation: man w/ one hand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    4,063

    Actually there was a group workin' on this...

    Quote Originally Posted by zedro
    how about an emergency inflato-suit, like car airbags?

    But what they found out was when the suit triggered the airbags, the airbags inflated & constricted the breathing & circulation. You can't forsee everything in the design phase of implementing an idea. I'm sure there is an answer for this problem, maybe just not feesable for actual production or mobility, good concept though. Wish I'd had one when I trashed my c-bone, contriction an' everything.

  45. #45

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    5,261
    i hope you werent taking me seriously...

  46. #46
    Tear it all out! SuperModerator
    Reputation: CraigH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    7,739
    There is a web page that shows a prototype airbag system for motorcycle riders. Basically the inflatable suit you mention.

  47. #47
    Tear it all out! SuperModerator
    Reputation: CraigH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    7,739
    Quote Originally Posted by macrider
    and those intercostal muscles hurt for a LONG time when you strain them...
    Watch out for back strain. Sometimes with cracked, broken or detatched ribs, you take pressure off the injury by leaning over a little. This messes up the muscles in your back, which give you a sore back.

    That is what happened when I cracked 3 ribs, and detatched them from the sternum.

    Going to the physio to have your intercostal muscles massages is a evil torture, but it did work to get rid of the knots in those muscles.

  48. #48
    Tear it all out! SuperModerator
    Reputation: CraigH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    7,739
    My brother has added lacross rib armour to his Dianese jacket to stop that kind of rib injury. I've also bought a set to add to my jacket, but I haven't gotten around to it yet. Sounds like I should...

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.