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Thread: Winter Shoes

  1. #1
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    Winter Shoes

    I have seen a few of the threads address winter cycling shoes, but what I am looking for are ideas about footwear for races that get cold (to -40 F) and last more than a day...
    I see some of these shoes and I gotta wonder if the rider has any toes left.

  2. #2
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    Flat pedals and what ever cold weather boot that works at below zero temps.

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    When I think of winter I think of cold/wet. In that case I definitely do not want to be riding platform pedals. I just wear the same shoes with neoprene covers. My feet stay warm and dry. I also wear the same light weight dry fit socks that I wear during the summer. My feet tend to sweat too much if I wear the thicker winter socks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flat Ark
    When I think of winter I think of cold/wet. In that case I definitely do not want to be riding platform pedals. I just wear the same shoes with neoprene covers. My feet stay warm and dry. I also wear the same light weight dry fit socks that I wear during the summer. My feet tend to sweat too much if I wear the thicker winter socks.
    He's talking about temps to -40 degrees, regular shoes with covers won't cut it. I use Lake winter shoes which do a good job, but even those don't hold up to -40 temperatures.

  5. #5
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    Lake winter shoes with insulated overboots?
    http://www.mountaingear.com/pages/pr...tem/101222/N/0
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnfiend
    Lake winter shoes with insulated overboots?
    http://www.mountaingear.com/pages/pr...tem/101222/N/0
    This is what I am trying this year. I have my Lake winter boots, an insulated size 15 liner (bought at fleet farm for $20), and then the overboots.

    I know Charlie F uses a liner inside his oversized Lake boots, but I already have Lake boots that fit.

    Lake boots + vapor barrier + wool socks works until about 0-10 deg F, but it's another ball game below that, especially since we are not talking just a couple of hours.

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    J-No, you are able to fit a liner INSIDE your boot? How thick is that liner?
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    Liner outside.

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    If the bottoms are not insulated, get some cheap closed cell foam and cut out a section that will fit inside the bottom of the overboot. Good luck. Luckily it gets down to about 40F here in SoCal so I don't have to worry about these issues.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

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    You might want to search the Alaska forum. There were a few long threads on this. Some guys were getting pretty creative.

  11. #11
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    my pearl izumi gtx barrier shoes have been great below zero for a few hours with wool socks and a neopreme outer as a reinforcement. that said they are only one size bigger than my normal shoes and for extreme temps/long term exposure, much bigger sizes are needed. my problem is i've got size 47 feet and most winter boots come in 48 on the big end. sidi and lake come 50 but most the time i don't need *that* much room as i'm not gonna be out that long. somewhere there's Mike Curiak's write up of his shoes/layering system that seems to be working great for him. it's really complicated but lots of good info. iirc he's a sz 44 normally and uses 48 or 50 lake boots.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkcustom
    I have seen a few of the threads address winter cycling shoes, but what I am looking for are ideas about footwear for races that get cold (to -40 F) and last more than a day...
    I see some of these shoes and I gotta wonder if the rider has any toes left.
    At -35 C my shimano winter boots work for about 1 hour then the cold starts to seep in...

    You would have to break the cleat to pedal connection to prevent that from occurring....it is pretty obvious where the cold spot is.

    We used double boots for XC skiing okay for a day around -35 C...

    They make some preety light mountaineering boots that are rated that cold.

  13. #13
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    Don't forget the vaseline.

  14. #14
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    I find wool sock to be a necessity. I have had good luck with booties and wool socks.
    We ride and never worry about the fall
    I guess that's just the cowboy in us all
    (Tim Mcgraw)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Morlahach
    Don't forget the vaseline.
    If you, logantri, and myself are going to share a room for TI V6 you better stop talking about vaseline.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J-No
    If you, logantri, and myself are going to share a room for TI V6 you better stop talking about vaseline.
    Good point.
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    Quote Originally Posted by markf
    my pearl izumi gtx barrier shoes have been great below zero for a few hours with wool socks and a neopreme outer as a reinforcement. that said they are only one size bigger than my normal shoes and for extreme temps/long term exposure, much bigger sizes are needed. my problem is i've got size 47 feet and most winter boots come in 48 on the big end. sidi and lake come 50 but most the time i don't need *that* much room as i'm not gonna be out that long. somewhere there's Mike Curiak's write up of his shoes/layering system that seems to be working great for him. it's really complicated but lots of good info. iirc he's a sz 44 normally and uses 48 or 50 lake boots.

    I just bought the same exact GTX barrier shoes from Pearl Izumi along with their new barrier booties. When you say below zero, is that deg F or Deg C?

    Thanks!

  18. #18
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    From the Alaska forum:

    Here

    and

    Here

    The second link has my favorite set up. I hate to start using adhesive on my Lakes because I like to use them by themselves.

  19. #19
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    What about these?

  20. #20
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    damn -40 riding that's gangsta!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by J-No
    What about these?
    Those look really bulky, and you would not be able to see your feet which would be creepy. The mountain hardware over boots look like they would not rub up too much on the crank arm (assuming you are using lakes and clipless). I have to get up to REI or some place the stocks this stuff here soon and check things out.
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  22. #22
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    I put one shoe combo together last night. I ordered these pedal extenders last winter and I had to use them. Lake boots + liners + overboots. It's pretty bulky. I used the velcro strap from my Niterider battery to cinch it down a bit and it seemed to help qithout being too constrictive. I'll try to get a pic later.

    Logantri, give me a ring sometime and you can stop by and check out the overboots.

  23. #23
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    Here's what I do.

    Not for everyone, not perfect, but definitely the best combo of compromises I've found yet. I can ride all day (all night too if needed) in them, day after day after day for a few weeks, down to about -50 or so. Beyond that I'm not all that worried about my feet...

    MC

  24. #24
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    Thanks for all the ideas. Truly one of the best aspects of a forum...brainstorming. I am in the process of making a pair from an old pair of Steger mukluks, Wintergreen pants, and touring shoes. Yes...just about as dorky as the DIY light people. But they should work and they are recycling a lot of great parts. And I get to use Barge cement. I will post the sons of b!#*#% in a few days. Thanks again.

    JK

    http://heckofthenorth.blogspot.com

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