Winter shoes for 20*F weather? So I'm not considering rain.- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 37 of 37
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22

    Winter shoes for 20*F weather? So I'm not considering rain.

    For me in CT, cold weather is mostly 20*F with occasional rides in the teens. When it gets into the teens, I don't mind putting in some chemical warmers. These don't have to be completely waterproof.


    Considering the Lake 303s and Shimano MW7s. It seems that 303s would do the trick, but my LBS deals with Shimano, so any comments on Shimano in the temperature range mentioned.

    Other brand suggestions are also welcomed.

    Thanks guys!

  2. #2
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Some "winter shoes" are nothing more than pretty much regular SPD shoes with neoprene cuffs. This is what the shimano shoes look like to me. I know I've handled some at the bike shop, but it's been a while.

    The biggest issue is the distance from your foot to the pedal cleat, the shorter the distance and less insulation, the worse the heat transfer. This is where most shoes fall flat for winter. The Lakes are decent, but IME more "cool weather" boots. My feet can cold soak after an hour or two around the freezing mark and using them below that takes some additional prep. It largely depends on how well your body circulates blood to your extremities, some people can ride in damn near summer gear in the middle of winter somehow. On the other hand, riding is miserable when your gear isn't cutting it, and it's so nice to be out riding for hours with warm hands and feet.

    The Lakes are nice and flexible, good water resistance IME, I would consider them more of a "cool weather" boot that I would ride down to around 30s-40s and just slightly below freezing for race-pace. With shoe covers and heaters (assuming the boots are big enough, just once size up is usually not quite enough IME, better to err on the side of being conservative) they will do quite a bit more, although below 0F it's usually better to break out the flat pedals and boots unless you really know what you are doing and have some good gear.

    The 45N wolfhammers are a little better at colder weather than the Lakes IME, a little more insulation, a lot stiffer boot though too.

    Another trick I've recently employed is to stick another insole on top of the stock one, boosting the insulation and distance to the metal cleat. Shoes must be bought large enough though.

    The problem with using spds in the winter is the pedal and cleat are great heat-sinks, your foot is close to this, your foot doesn't flex and force blood to the toes like during walking/running and even the front of the boot becomes a heat-sink IMO, constantly getting hit by sub-freezing air, making the toebox problematic.

    It's really difficult to say whether a boot will work for a specific person. I'd say make sure to get it big enough, thick socks require upsizing at least a size and THEN you want additional room to be able to wiggle and move your foot about. Based on my experience, I'd say don't even think about the Shimanos. The Lakes might cut it, it'd be close IME, but if that's as cold as you are going to ride you can probably do shoe covers, chem heaters, and some of the other tricks out there.

    I ride with my SPD pedals down to about -20F max, but I have various measures that I take to do that and specialized equipment (electric heaters). If there's going to be a sustained cold spell in the -Fs though, I'll switch the pedals for flats. If it's generally 20░F to zero most of the time, I just leave the SPDs on. Even here in Anchorage it's rare to get -F temps for more than a couple days, has only happened overnight a couple times so far.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    The biggest issue is the distance from your foot to the pedal cleat, the shorter the distance and less insulation, the worse the heat transfer. This is where most shoes fall flat for winter.
    .
    .
    .
    Another trick I've recently employed is to stick another insole on top of the stock one, boosting the insulation and distance to the metal cleat. Shoes must be bought large enough though.

    The problem with using spds in the winter is the pedal and cleat are great heat-sinks, your foot is close to this, your foot doesn't flex and force blood to the toes like during walking/running and even the front of the boot becomes a heat-sink IMO, constantly getting hit by sub-freezing air, making the toebox problematic.
    Do the extra insoles give you approximately another layer of thin sock protection?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    BTW, thank you for the synopsis.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    Jayem, if the padding underneath your feet is the biggest source of heat loss, have you considered cutting out a silicon baking matt for your insole. Silicon baking matts have very little heat conductivity.

  6. #6
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,773
    I live on Long Island so my winter temps are probably similar to yours. I have the Lake 303's and I really like them. I wear one pair of wicking socks in them and my feet are always warm. Here's the SLIGHT problem I have. When the temps are between 30 and 40, it's really too warm for the 303's. My only other shoes are regular Shimano shoes that I wear the rest of the year. I usually get by with the Shimanos and two pair of socks but sometimes, not really.
    I recently began looking at different shoes for the in between weather. Since I wear a size 50 I'm a little limited. I found Lake MX145 which looks really nice but no one has em around here and they're 256 dollars. I'd really like to see them before buying.
    Second, there's the Specialized Defroster. Looks like a decent shoe. I can get them locally for 200 bucks.
    I like turtles

  7. #7
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Quote Originally Posted by sowestport View Post
    Jayem, if the padding underneath your feet is the biggest source of heat loss, have you considered cutting out a silicon baking matt for your insole. Silicon baking matts have very little heat conductivity.
    Remember, I said it's probably the biggest, but not the only. I find there's very little real insulation between your toes and the outside of the toe-box, given that the shoe is traveling in the wind constantly. That means that the wind is going to be effective in cooling the toe-box by conduction. I find that layered empty spaces are great at providing insulation, but you don't get any here. Putting a shoe-cover on the outside of the shoe does help dramatically with this and makes it so the outermost layer of the shoe isn't being constantly hit by the wind.

    My 2nd insole contains the heating element for my hotronics heaters though, so no need to switch it Would be interesting to try. I know the 45N have the "aerogel", but it's so damn thin I have to think that a bit more silicone would be better.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Quote Originally Posted by sowestport View Post
    Do the extra insoles give you approximately another layer of thin sock protection?
    The problem with more sock is it doesn't necessarily give you insulation where you really need it, therefore it will contribute to your foot sweating. The sock is also more compressible, so the heat transfer is easier IME with thicker socks and thinner insoles. I was just "testing" this away from home in Oklahoma a couple weeks ago when the temps were in the 40s and 30s when I was night riding. I got some frozen-*** feet because I didn't bring my winter gear.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    @Jayem, the 45nrth Japanther review shows a very high tech footbed to address the cleat heat sink problem. I'm now seriously looking into these shoes since my LBS can get those:

    45NRTH Japanther Winter Boots Review | Singletracks Mountain Bike News

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    689
    CT here, and I have the Lake MXZ 303 and they are great! I've always got cold feet (I usually need shoe covers under 40-45 degrees) and these work for me in the low 20's with just a single medium thickness wool sock.
    I like bikes

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kevrider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    275
    i have mavic crossmax pro thermo boots, which work well for me into the 20s. i haven't had to test them in the teens lately. my fiancÚ has a pair of northwave winter boots, but i doubt she has been out below freezing, yet.
    In a world full of people, only some want to ride. Isn't that crazy?
    Seal/CRAZY/misquoted

  12. #12
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Being too warm is not nearly as much of a problem to me as being too cold. I've dumped a lot of money in methods and products that just didn't cut it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    Looks like my LBS can only get L Garneau or Shimano, so any comments of bulkiness and performance for this Garneau Klondike?

    https://garneau.com/ca/en/klondike

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by yzedf View Post
    CT here, and I have the Lake MXZ 303 and they are great! I've always got cold feet (I usually need shoe covers under 40-45 degrees) and these work for me in the low 20's with just a single medium thickness wool sock.
    That's very helpful. Thanks!

  15. #15
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Quote Originally Posted by sowestport View Post
    Looks like my LBS can only get L Garneau or Shimano, so any comments of bulkiness and performance for this Garneau Klondike?

    https://garneau.com/ca/en/klondike
    The klondike *seems* more substantial than the shimano, it would be my pick for the temperatures you indicated. I hate cold feet.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  16. #16
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    10,773
    DAMN!! Those Klondikes are silly money.
    I like turtles

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    261
    Why not flat pedals? Options open way up then, just buy normal winter boots.

    Also, a trick I used to do as a kid was to stick my foot in a plastic shopping bag before my winter boots. Helps with water, but more importantly on a bike, wind. Super cheap. Traps a bit of heat, but unfortunately also traps moisture and heat transfer is very fast. I'd try it out with just some wool socks.

  18. #18
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    27,634
    IMO, winter bike shoes are stupid money for short term use.

    I started using platform pedals so I could wear regular hiking boots. I've been extremely comfortable in regular hiking boots and good socks (different weights/layering depending on temps) down to about 0F. I haven't found a need for actual winter insulated boots in the temps I ride in yet.

    Turned out I liked riding with platform pedals, so I kept them for summer riding, too. I'll install clipless pedals for races, but for normal rides, nah.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    492
    Anybody give thought to neoprene booties? Do they still exist? I've also used neoprene for an insole.
    Gckless sounds like his thoughts are similar to mine. Good bike gear should be like a good mate. Cheap, not bad looking and works!
    "Your helmet cover may be made for bikers, but mine is a shower cap. And it's white with blue flowers, neener-neener-neener"

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    106
    Jayem's post was great. I have the Lake 303's. Below 30 degrees I need a meaty pair of wool sox or my toes are red after about an hour. They are heavy but are also good hiking boots. Got em on eBay for $280?

    Below 25F I use my 45NRTH Wolvhammers. I took them off a couple of years ago after three hours in sub 15F temps and my feet were sweating DAF, but super expensive ($348?).

    Above 38F I use the Specialized Defrosters and stay with them up to about 50F degrees. Great shoes and very light. List for $200.

    I like all these boots at different temps as above. My eight month a year shoes are Shimano, Spec and SIDI (race).
    Don't post, ride.

  21. #21
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Quote Originally Posted by thegock View Post
    Jayem's post was great. I have the Lake 303's. Below 30 degrees I need a meaty pair of wool sox or my toes are red after about an hour. They are heavy but are also good hiking boots. Got em on eBay for $280?

    Below 25F I use my 45NRTH Wolvhammers. I took them off a couple of years ago after three hours in sub 15F temps and my feet were sweating DAF, but super expensive ($348?).

    Above 38F I use the Specialized Defrosters and stay with them up to about 50F degrees. Great shoes and very light. List for $200.

    I like all these boots at different temps as above. My eight month a year shoes are Shimano, Spec and SIDI (race).
    Financially it's a hit, but then being able to go ride an time in any conditions with ease is highly worth it. Those times that you are "fighting" the conditions and just trying to survive are often not fun at all. It's hard to justify the cost sometimes, but IMO it's something I should have done years ago, even back in Arizona, where I used to do a few rides in the cold, once that was somewhere between +5 and -5 and the worst ride I ever did because my gear was so crappy.

    Last night at around -8░F. Riding in these temps with warm digits is somewhat mind-blowing to me after all I've experienced elswhere:Winter shoes for 20*F weather? So I'm not considering rain.-15697542_10154216453138951_2985127556417455903_n.jpg
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    131
    Quote Originally Posted by sowestport View Post
    Jayem, if the padding underneath your feet is the biggest source of heat loss, have you considered cutting out a silicon baking matt for your insole. Silicon baking matts have very little heat conductivity.
    I like your thinking outside the box, with alternative insole materials. Most of the r-value (insulation effectiveness) figures out there are for foamed versions of materials, not solid ones, but, from what I have seen, solid silicone rubber has about 1/2 the r-value of a silicone foam, for any given thickness. So in other words, the gas bubbles in the silicone foam are a more effective insulator than silicone itself. Many other foams are even better insulators than silicone foam, so there isn't a particular insulative magic to silicone itself. I think the reason is that it is so good for baking is that it is a good enough insulator, while having outstanding melt resistance far above other rubbery materials, so it can take the higher temperature exposure of a cooking application.

    So, ballparking it:
    Silicone r-value: Approx 1.2-1.3
    Silicone foam r-value: Approx 2.2-2.5
    Many other foam rubbers: 2.0-3.8

    As Jayem said, you need to take compressibility into account though, so if a foam is too soft it will just squish down to nothing under your body weight and lose much of its r-value.

    Interestingly, the Aerogel that 45Nrth uses in their insoles has an incredibly high r-value of over 10!, although that is theoretical and I am not sure how much they are actually using in their insoles and how much it is subject to compression. They are also big bucks, like somewhere around $80 for just insoles. Another guy here on MTBR was saying that the cheap aerogel insoles on Amazon were actually pretty decent.

    But yeah, if you have room in your shoe, there are a ton of foam rubber sheet sources online where you could pick up a lifetime supply for $10. You may even have some scrap laying around the house, like old mouse pads, or an old wetsuit.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    492
    like old mouse pads, or an old wetsuit.
    Wetsuit = neoprene. I've been reading about compressing the foam and losing R value. On a bike, there won't be as much compression as walking. I know I ain't gettin' offa no seat on potentially slick roads. Plus HOPEFULLY, your feet aren't in 2" of glop when on the bike (if they are, yer a better rider than I).

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by TheKaiser View Post
    I like your thinking outside the box, with alternative insole materials. Most of the r-value (insulation effectiveness) figures out there are for foamed versions of materials, not solid ones, but, from what I have seen, solid silicone rubber has about 1/2 the r-value of a silicone foam, for any given thickness. So in other words, the gas bubbles in the silicone foam are a more effective insulator than silicone itself. Many other foams are even better insulators than silicone foam, so there isn't a particular insulative magic to silicone itself. I think the reason is that it is so good for baking is that it is a good enough insulator, while having outstanding melt resistance far above other rubbery materials, so it can take the higher temperature exposure of a cooking application.

    So, ballparking it:
    Silicone r-value: Approx 1.2-1.3
    Silicone foam r-value: Approx 2.2-2.5
    Many other foam rubbers: 2.0-3.8

    As Jayem said, you need to take compressibility into account though, so if a foam is too soft it will just squish down to nothing under your body weight and lose much of its r-value.

    Interestingly, the Aerogel that 45Nrth uses in their insoles has an incredibly high r-value of over 10!, although that is theoretical and I am not sure how much they are actually using in their insoles and how much it is subject to compression. They are also big bucks, like somewhere around $80 for just insoles. Another guy here on MTBR was saying that the cheap aerogel insoles on Amazon were actually pretty decent.

    But yeah, if you have room in your shoe, there are a ton of foam rubber sheet sources online where you could pick up a lifetime supply for $10. You may even have some scrap laying around the house, like old mouse pads, or an old wetsuit.
    I like the R-value metric, but one observation makes me question the r-value of silicon, which is that the silicon can be used to hold pots and pans that have been baking in the oven in high temperatures. I hardly feel any heat transferred, so I was thinking that the cleat being a heat sink would definitely be addressed with silicon.

    I just ordered a pair of Shimano's with a bit of room to play with inserts. Thank you for your r-value perspective!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wilks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,371
    I'm in northern NJ so similar temps. I use diadora Polaris that I got on closeout for temps in the mid 30s to low 40s and have the Lake 303s for teens to mid 30s. I just use a good merino sock and I'm golden. I've tried shimano winter boots and found them to be crap. Can't remember the model though.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSAmerica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    359
    My feet get cold in my Northwave Arctic. I gave up and put Hotronic's S4 FootWarmers in. This weekend I rode for 4 hours in 14 Deg F with warm feet.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    that's cold and that's a serious setup

  28. #28
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Quote Originally Posted by RSAmerica View Post
    My feet get cold in my Northwave Arctic. I gave up and put Hotronic's S4 FootWarmers in. This weekend I rode for 4 hours in 14 Deg F with warm feet.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Put some snow gaiters over em, kind of tucks everything away and makes it so you can't snag anything.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  29. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSAmerica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    359
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Put some snow gaiters over em, kind of tucks everything away and makes it so you can't snag anything.
    I do ride with gaiters over the battery and wiring.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    First, thank you guys for all the feedback.

    My LBS only could get the Shimano mw7, size 43. I wear shimano 42 in both road and mtb, so there's a bit of room, which I take advantage on my last ride.

    1st time at 17*F for little over an hour, my toes were uncomfortably cold. I had summer weight socks on.

    2nd time at 30*F for 1hr 20min, my toes were cold and kind of uncomfortable.

    3rd time at 27*F for 1hr 20min, I put on ski socks, chemical warmers, and on one side, I put a 5mm thermal insole. My feet were comfortable on both sides and the side with thermal insole was noticeably warmer.

    So I will go with chemical warmers below freezing and will always wear thicker socks.

    Caught a cold, so more updates later.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    22
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Financially it's a hit, but then being able to go ride an time in any conditions with ease is highly worth it. Those times that you are "fighting" the conditions and just trying to survive are often not fun at all. It's hard to justify the cost sometimes, but IMO it's something I should have done years ago, even back in Arizona, where I used to do a few rides in the cold, once that was somewhere between +5 and -5 and the worst ride I ever did because my gear was so crappy.

    Last night at around -8░F. Riding in these temps with warm digits is somewhat mind-blowing to me after all I've experienced elswhere:Click image for larger version. 

Name:	15697542_10154216453138951_2985127556417455903_n.jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	204.9 KB 
ID:	1111918
    AWESOME night pic!

    BTW, I may have to go to wolvhammers

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    59
    Surplus military Mickey Mouse boots with flats.

    My feet get cold just looking out the window and these things kick butt.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,917
    Quote Originally Posted by ronhextall View Post
    My feet get cold just looking out the window and these things kick butt.
    Same here. Northwave Artics for >25F, but after that I use flats and a nice pair of Salomon winter boots. They also double as my snowshoeing boots.

  34. #34
    Live Free & Ride
    Reputation: NH Mtbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,510
    Thread resurrect...

    Has anyone tried or seen the Northwave Raptor shoes? I am still trying to determine the right size and how they will hold up in 20-35 deg temps. One size up from 45 or US 11 could make sense for thicker socks. Input appreciated.

    https://www.merlincycles.com/northwa...oe-105198.html
    17 Fuel EX 9.9 (in progress)
    19 FM 279 carbon gravel
    17 Stache 29+
    14 GT Zaskar 100 9r

    https://kettleheadbrewing.com/

  35. #35
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    32,658
    Quote Originally Posted by NH Mtbiker View Post
    Thread resurrect...

    Has anyone tried or seen the Northwave Raptor shoes? I am still trying to determine the right size and how they will hold up in 20-35 deg temps. One size up from 45 or US 11 could make sense for thicker socks. Input appreciated.

    https://www.merlincycles.com/northwa...oe-105198.html
    20 degrees? I hope your feet are like little self-sustaining stoves...Those don't look in any way sufficient for 20 degrees or even 35.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  36. #36
    Live Free & Ride
    Reputation: NH Mtbiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,510
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    20 degrees? I hope your feet are like little self-sustaining stoves...Those don't look in any way sufficient for 20 degrees or even 35.
    Yeah, I decided on something else. I normally just run flat pedals with insulated light-weight winter boots. Will do the same but would like the option to run clipless pedals on the gravel bike.
    Decided to go with an inexpensive shoe cover like these:
    https://www.amazon.com/Dovewill-Shoe...HT3GGAMRVCS1FA
    17 Fuel EX 9.9 (in progress)
    19 FM 279 carbon gravel
    17 Stache 29+
    14 GT Zaskar 100 9r

    https://kettleheadbrewing.com/

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sturge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    1,255
    Quote Originally Posted by NH Mtbiker View Post
    Yeah, I decided on something else. I normally just run flat pedals with insulated light-weight winter boots. Will do the same but would like the option to run clipless pedals on the gravel bike.
    Decided to go with an inexpensive shoe cover like these:
    https://www.amazon.com/Dovewill-Shoe...HT3GGAMRVCS1FA
    I'm in CT and have had good results using similar shoe cover arrangement as low as single digits for 2hr rides. I also slip a hand warmer between shoe and socks over the tops of my toes. The shoe covers act as a windbreaker and keep the heat of the hand warmer contained. This works for me with standard spd type riding shoes.

    I've always preferred being clipped in but occasionally I've swapped to flats allowing me to use warm/comfortable winter shoes with good results.
    12 Santa Cruz Heckler
    18 Kona Process 153 AL/DL (27.5)...:thumbsup:

Similar Threads

  1. Shoes for Hot weather
    By Gallego in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-01-2014, 02:16 PM
  2. dry shoes/feet in the rain?
    By XJaredX in forum Commuting
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 12-09-2013, 11:44 AM
  3. SPD compatible shoes for rain/wet weather use
    By Verttii in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-19-2013, 02:30 PM
  4. Does anyone here use helmet covers for cold weather/rain?
    By Muffinhead in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-09-2013, 09:44 AM
  5. Shoes for Cold wet weather
    By vinnyl26 in forum Apparel and Protection
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 10-24-2011, 06:37 PM

Members who have read this thread: 36

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.