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Thread: Winter Shoes

  1. #1
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    Winter Shoes

    Looking for some suggestions on winter shoes for new england mountain biking. Currently wear a 43.5 specialized comp shoe (think fake sidi). Tried warmer merino socks and booties but still a little to cold (numb toes). So I have been thinking about Lakes. Good news they are blowing out the MXZ300. Bad news 44 is the most common size on the planet. Good news they have a MXZ301 that I can get a pretty good deal on. Bad news you would think they would make a roomier toe box.

    1. Opinons on Lake winter shoes.

    2. Sizing suggestions I am a pretty solid 43 in all my other footwear. Thinking that a 44 if to tight I could get a shoe repair place to stretch out the toe box.

    3. Has anyone tried the 301's with the new Boa.

    Both myself and I toes thank you for your help.

  2. #2
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    Winter Shoes

    I had Sidi storms for two years and purchased a pair of the Lake MX300s on sale a few weeks ago. I like the Lakes much more than the Sidis. The Lakes have better sealing around the ankle and the leather seems more durable. I bought one size larger than my summer shoes. Not sure about stretching the toe box.

  3. #3
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    Just got off the phone

    Quote Originally Posted by CHSAD
    Looking for some suggestions on winter shoes for new england mountain biking. Currently wear a 43.5 specialized comp shoe (think fake sidi). Tried warmer merino socks and booties but still a little to cold (numb toes). So I have been thinking about Lakes. Good news they are blowing out the MXZ300. Bad news 44 is the most common size on the planet. Good news they have a MXZ301 that I can get a pretty good deal on. Bad news you would think they would make a roomier toe box.

    1. Opinons on Lake winter shoes.

    2. Sizing suggestions I am a pretty solid 43 in all my other footwear. Thinking that a 44 if to tight I could get a shoe repair place to stretch out the toe box.

    3. Has anyone tried the 301's with the new Boa.

    Both myself and I toes thank you for your help.
    with Lake regarding my year old MXZ300 shoes. When I first got them I truly loved them but I think the description of the quality is misleading. The stitching around the heel and toe is very poor, I just had them restitched and they still look like they will not last for another season. Because the stitching failed on the heel of both shoes there is now an identation that sticks out causing the heel to rub against my frame when pedaling. Not happy about the quality of these shoes. Even with them being restitched there is still the identation that sticks out on both shoes. Do not believe the hype about how well the MXZs are made. They look nice and are very comfortable but they won't last very long.

    I am a diabetic(we get cold feet and numbness real easily) and bought the MXZ300 for numerous reasons. I live in California and do not ride any trails that would cause these shoes the damage they show. I have a pair of Sidi hi tops(I forget the model) that have lasted for 6 years without any serious damage! But I bought the Sidis a size too small for winter socks, my mistake. That is why I went with the Lake MXZ300. I did buy the right size MXZ300 for winter socks- a size bigger than normal.

    The MXZ300 is more comfortable than the Sidi but the Sidi is made with much better quality, in my opinion.
    My beat box is bumpin' and my rhymes are fresh...
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  4. #4

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    Lake troubles

    The Lake shoes are the best for cold weather but mine also fell apart at the heel.Found a good shoe cobbler and he fixed them up with stronger stitching and glue,been good since.I had the Sidi but did not have enough insulation,I use them in the fall.Even with the Lakes my feet still get cold now and then.I put some toe warmers up front and never have a problem that way.Also went a full size bigger than my normal 45's.Wool socks and toe warmers the 46's are a good fit.

  5. #5
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    The Lake's are a great shoe for a SHORT TIME, but as these posts say, they'll fall apart! Its a shame. My friend and I both wore ours out in under a year, at which time they were sent back under warranty. Get this- the manual says something about having a good silicone glue on hand to fix the heel and toe!! Unbelievable, but I sh!t you not.

  6. #6
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    Easy answer

    There is no "secret" or "best" winter shoe. Find yourself a budget "recreational" mtb type shoe like the ones Cannondale makes. The toe box is roomier and the soles are thicker. Buy at least the next whole size up. Ducktape over the forefoot and toes. Put on a pair of thin socks. Then put a heavy pair of rag wool socks over the top. That should do it.

    If you still get cold feet... Get yourself some of those shaped, adhesive toe warmers and place them over the tops of the toes (not under). I find the best brand is "Heat Factory" brand. (www.heatfactory.com).For further protection I use a pair of gators to cover my ankle and lower legs. I find the gators much better than simply using a "hightop" type of shoe. They do a better job at protecting your lower legs and feet, they are lighter, and more versatile (I use mine for xc sking and snow shoeing).

    Trust me. This is not only probably the most effective way to go but also likely the cheapest. "Been there, done it."

    Mike
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  7. #7
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    Get a pair of shoes a size too big, wear thick socks and gortex oversocks



    and if wet, you can try a pair of booties overshoes to keep moisture and mud out of your shoes. Works for me. Gortex oversocks are the ultimate winter accessory. D.
    You be you. I'll be riding.

  8. #8
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    yeah

    I rode for years in old cross trainers in the winter but I was using toe-clips. The problem with Lakes is that narrow toe box. If they just widened it up slightly it would be great. For 200.00 a whack.............I like the idea of a cheap pair of mid-cut cannondales and some tape. I am going to brave the 30 degree temps today in my low cut specializeds with neoprene covers, merino wool socks and a plastic bag over my toes if I have to for wind.

  9. #9

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    Mxz301

    Quote Originally Posted by CHSAD
    Looking for some suggestions on winter shoes for new england mountain biking. Currently wear a 43.5 specialized comp shoe (think fake sidi). Tried warmer merino socks and booties but still a little to cold (numb toes). So I have been thinking about Lakes. Good news they are blowing out the MXZ300. Bad news 44 is the most common size on the planet. Good news they have a MXZ301 that I can get a pretty good deal on. Bad news you would think they would make a roomier toe box.

    1. Opinons on Lake winter shoes.

    2. Sizing suggestions I am a pretty solid 43 in all my other footwear. Thinking that a 44 if to tight I could get a shoe repair place to stretch out the toe box.

    3. Has anyone tried the 301's with the new Boa.

    Both myself and I toes thank you for your help.
    I've just got a new pair of the Lake, MXZ301. I hope they don't develope heel or toe trouble because I paid a pretty penny for them. I've used them about 7 times so far and They still look good, and twice is was in the rain. I commute to work everyday and got them because I'm tired of putting on shoe covers over my SIDI Dominators when it gets cold. I ride everyday 45 minutes to and from work so we will find out what they are made of. So far I like what I see.

    The coldest it's gotten is 20 degrees and I was out for an hour and my feet were plenty warm.

    As far as fit goes, I ride a 44.5 SIDI Dominator. I have a foot on the narrow side and the SIDIs were a good fit. I'd use the phrase "Fit Like A Glove". I got the size 45 in the lake for wool sock space for when it get below 0 degrees and such. With cycling socks on I'd have to say they are about a 1/2 size too big, but I can get Dr. Sholes heel cups to take up the space if need be, plus the toes box is a bit wider than I'd like, but with a wool sock they fit perfect.

    The BOA Lacing system
    http://www.boatechnology.com/
    The system works really well. The shoe tightens to the contour of your foot, and it's easily adjustable with the side wheel. It seems like with the SIDIs After about 10 minute I have to tigthen them up,and that's impossible with shoe covers. The lakes Also open up real wide so they can dry out.

    I have fallen archs so my ankle tends to get real close to the crank arm. In fact when I use shoe covers then do rub the crank arm so I have to use a set of pedals with KneeSavers
    http://www.bikescor.com/product/knee.htm

    Also I know that speedplay
    http://www.speedplay.com/index.cfm
    has an option for a longer length spindle. I think you have 1/8" and 1/4" extra length options.

    The Lake MXZ301s have about as much clearence as botties, so I have have to use my extension with them.

    Someone bought the 44s at my LBS before I could try them on but I'd imagine they would be too small, especially for the thick socks. I'll follow up on this in about a month. So far so good.

  10. #10
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    Gortex booties are nice if it's going to be wet...

    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan!
    Get a pair of shoes a size too big, wear thick socks and gortex oversocks



    and if wet, you can try a pair of booties overshoes to keep moisture and mud out of your shoes. Works for me. Gortex oversocks are the ultimate winter accessory. D.

    I've got that exact pair. They are expensive though.

    Mike

  11. #11

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    I just got the new mxz301's

    I just tested them in the deep snow trying to ride the snowmobile trails. The snow was too loose today so I ended up walking a lot. Not the best test but here's my results

    Where:

    I ordered a 44 in the Lake MXZ301 from www.bikeman.com for just under $200 and had them the next day.

    Fit:

    I ride a set of 43.5 Sidi Road shoes (Genius 3) and they fit perfect. I figured that I'd try 44 in the LAKE MXZ301. It was a wize choice as they fit great. The toe box is wiggle your toes friendly yet the width through the instep is tight enough to keep your foot in place while spinning hard in the pedals.

    Warmth:

    This is the reason you'd buy these boots, so how do I think they'll perform? So far they are perfect. Walking in deep snow and slush I found them warm. But the real test will be the cold dry nights when you are on the saddle for an hour and not walking. Walking had me hot trudging through the snow trying to find better riding under the pine forest.

    Features:

    BOA... Not sure about this on a MTB boot. It looks kind of easy to snap off as it sticks off the side of the boot. I'm sure a normal hit by a rock in that area will take the BOA and send it to plastic part hell. Also I like being able to hold the ankle end of my foot tighter than the instep/toe area. BOA adjust the whole foot the same. Not a big deal but I like tuning the fit with straps.

    Cleats... If you like them you'll be happy, as they give you a lifetime supply with the boots.

    Overall:

    If you find yourself riding a lot in the fall and winter, hate booties, dealing with charcoal heaters and cold wet feet like I do you'll love these boots. They are like narrow, light weight hiking boots with SPD plates on them. They are water resistant, comfortable, warm and not bulky. You'll be glad you spent money on something to help you ride longer rather than something else you were planning on buying that only has pose factor.

  12. #12
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    I just went through this too

    I am a solid 43 in the Specialized comp shoes I have, and wanted the 44s. I decided to go with the ANSWER kashmer (SP?) at $120 they are a great shoe, and I have no complaints. Don't go bigger in this shoe, as they are really big, and the toe box is rather roomy.

  13. #13

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    Boa System

    Quote Originally Posted by ducatirdr
    BOA... Not sure about this on a MTB boot. It looks kind of easy to snap off as it sticks off the side of the boot. I'm sure a normal hit by a rock in that area will take the BOA and send it to plastic part hell. Also I like being able to hold the ankle end of my foot tighter than the instep/toe area. BOA adjust the whole foot the same. Not a big deal but I like tuning the fit with straps.
    I went on a Cold, Snow ride a couple days ago. 15 degrees for about 90 minutes after a 8 to 10 inch snow. My feet stayed warm and dry. I do say when it was time to take them off the Boa System was packed with Ice and it took a little manipulation to get it to release. No big deal about a 20 second delay. I've hit the boa knob on a couple rock and so far so good. If you go to the Boa Site they sell spare parts
    http://www.boatechnology.com/boa.php?section=retailer
    I've never had them apart and I'm not sure how the work.

  14. #14
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    I go along with MJ's advice. I bought a pair of El Cheapo Nashbar hightops about 6 years ago. Bought them one size bigger than my street shoes and can comfortably wear 4 pairs of socks. I've ridden in sub-zero F weather many times and have only had minor cold feet on a few occasions. The shoes are as good as new, no duct tape needed. Gaitors provide better coverage with hightops also.

    Sure, you can spend big money on the Lakes, but I don't think you need to.

  15. #15
    Who pickin the banjo?
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    Errr...flat pedals and whatever hiking/winter boots keep your feet warm.
    "We ought never to look behind us with regret nor ahead with fear, but around us with awareness."

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by menachite
    Errr...flat pedals and whatever hiking/winter boots keep your feet warm.
    100% agreed. I am a cold weather sissy boy (living in NE Ohio, that ain't good) but I ride comfortably all winter. Good gloves, flat pedals and some toasty timberlands and Im all set.
    though hope is frail, it must prevail - Taj Weekes

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  17. #17
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    Keep your shoes

    I go in another direction because I don't like the heel slip that I got from Sidi's or Lakes.
    Neoprene over-booties. There are many makers of these, but I have held onto the
    Trek version for several seasons after shredding some others in a year.
    Advantages: $40, removable, keep your good fitting shoes, thick rubber soles can be trimmed for flawless cleat interface.
    Disadvantage: it gets sweaty in there. I've come back on 4 degree rides wondering if I hit a puddle and forgot.
    Wool underneath will keep sweaty feet warm.
    MCM # 57

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